BAPAM Training Day – Mental Health Perspectives Session 1: Anxiety

January 20th, 2017

London, National Council For Voluntary Organisations
Saturday, 20 May 2017
09:30 - 17:00

Performing arts mental health has recently been the welcome focus of much attention in the media and throughout the industry, and with increasing numbers of mental health professionals joining our Directory of Practitioners, we’re planning a series of events sharing informed perspectives in this area. We’re starting this programme with our May 20 Training Day focusing on Anxiety. Registration is now open.

BAPAM Training Days are aimed at healthcare practitioners and are a platform for sharing professional expertise and good practice, supporting a network of performing arts medicine professionals. They are also of particular relevance to people working in arts education, employment, welfare, and support. All are welcome but for performers and other groups wishing to learn and share practical skills for healthy, optimal performance, we’ll also be building on our programme of workshop-based sessions though 2017. We’ll keep you up to date on future events.

BAPAM Registered Practitioners who wish to attend should note that they now qualify for the lower ‘BAPAM Authorised’ price bracket.

Our programme includes presentations on:

Diagnosis & Management of Anxiety Disorders

Techniques for anxiety management in performers

Performance Anxiety: research and practice using the Performance Simulator at the Centre for Performance Science, Royal College of Music

Perfectionism: the good, the bad and how CBT can help

Performers’ experiences: interviews and Q and A with performers

Arts Minds Project – Research Findings

Speaker details, full information and tickets available now on the event page - Book Your Place Now

‘Composed’ – a Film about Performance Anxiety, Exclusive London Screening

March 15th, 2017

Composed invites you into the world of professional classical music, for an exploration of the many causes of and solutions for performance anxiety.  This feature documentary brings together dozens of professionals from prestigious orchestras, symphonies, and music schools to discuss their personal journeys, and consider how best to achieve excellence in the face of enormous pressure. Composed finally confirms what so many of us have always secretly wondered – no, it’s not just you who has experienced the physical and mental agonies of performance anxiety, and yes, there are many ways to overcome the symptoms and deliver peak auditions and performances.

A special preview screening, followed by a Q&A with director, John Beder, will be held at the 1901 Arts Club, Waterloo, London, on Tuesday 2nd May. Doors open at 6pm and the film will be screened at 7pm.

Book tickets here.

 

 

Frances Wilson is Fundraising for BAPAM

March 14th, 2017

Frances Wilson PhotoWe are very grateful to Frances Wilson, aka music blogger The Cross-Eyed Pianist who, as well as organising Graham Fitch’s sold out performance of the Goldberg Variations in aid of BAPAM, has now set up a fundraising page on Just Giving to help support our work. Here’s why Frances is supporting us:

I and a number of other musician friends and colleagues have benefitted greatly from the expert, specialist services and support offered by BAPAM, including access to physiotherapists and hand specialists, workshops and training days examining issues such as posture, exercise and coping with performance anxiety, and free leaflets and helpsheets via their website.

Please help BAPAM continue its important work supporting musicians and performers by making a donation.

Thank you.

BAPAM make a real difference to musicians and all performers who are overcoming work-related health problems. We enable arts professionals to make informed decisions, access effective care and get back to performing as quickly as possible.

You can make a donation here.

BAPAM Clinic in Glasgow to Close from March 2017

March 10th, 2017

Our Glasgow clinician, Dr Faith Gardner, who has been helping performers in Scotland at free BAPAM clinics since 2004, will be retiring later this month. We are very grateful to Faith for her expertise and the support she’s given us during this time, and we wish her all the best for the future.

BAPAM is in the midst of a review of our funding and national services provision. We are unable to recruit a replacement for Dr Gardner or make plans for our clinics beyond 2017 until discussions with key stakeholders have been completed, hopefully later this year. Our Glasgow clinic will therefore close from 14th March.

BAPAM clinics provide free, performing arts-specific medical advice, enabling people to make informed decisions and facilitating effective ongoing care. Dr Gardner worked with us in developing a network of colleagues in Scotland, and building relationships with local institutions including educators, orchestras, unions and employers, as well as individual performers. The clinic has been held for many years at Scottish Opera’s Technical Centre and we are grateful for their essential support. If in future we are able to re-open a clinic in Scotland, we hope to work collaboratively and build on our experience to develop an effective, sustainable service, accessible to all performing arts professionals and students.

Information about performing arts health support services and advice is available from the BAPAM team and website.

ISM Trust Publish Performance Anxiety Guidance for Music Teachers

March 10th, 2017

The ISM Trust, the sister charity of the Incorporated Society of Musicians, has published Performance Anxiety – a practical guide for music teachers, a ground-breaking publication designed to provide music teachers with a comprehensive guide to the identification and management of performance anxiety over three key time periods: long-term strategies, the week leading up for a performance, and 24 hours leading up to, throughout and after a performance.

Full information and free download here.

Musician’s Focal Dystonia Presentation by MSc students in Performing Arts Medicine

March 3rd, 2017

Wednesday 22/03/17 6pm
Royal London Hospital for Integrated Medicine
Please confirm attendance with Nicholas.Straiton@uclh.nhs.uk

Research Published into Ballet Dancers’ Experiences of Injury and Osteopathy

February 24th, 2017

Osteopath, Toby Pollard-Smith, has published his research into Professional ballet dancers’ experience of injury and osteopathic treatment in the UK  in the January 2017 issue of the Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies. BAPAM helped recruit participants for the project, which Toby undertook while training to be an osteopath.

Toby’s previous career as a professional ballet dancer contributed to his interest and expertise in treating dance injuries, and we were recently pleased to welcome him to our Directory of Practitioners. Toby, who is also a keen trumpet player, treats dancers, musicians and other performing artists in Ascot and Marlow. Find Toby Pollard-Smith on the BAPAM Directory.

Research: Vocal Health Awareness in Singing Students and Teachers

February 16th, 2017

Dr Anneliese Sayes is a medical doctor and researcher at the Royal College of Music who is investigating the current knowledge levels of vocal anatomy, physiology and pathology in singing students (within the conservatoire and university systems) and singing teachers.

She is inviting participants to fill in a questionnaire (that should take around 10-15 minutes to complete). There is a separate questionnaire for students and teachers. Full information about the study, which has research ethics approval from Conservatoires UK, is also provided. The survey can be accessed online via the following links:

Vocal Awareness questionnaire for student singers

Vocal Awareness questionnaire for singing teachers

Survey: Musical ergonomics in professional UK orchestras

February 9th, 2017

Are you a musician working in a professional UK-based orchestra? Could you help us support research into performer healthcare by completing a short anonymous survey on musical ergonomics?

If so, please read the information below before you complete the survey. The survey should take no more than 5 minutes.

Subject: A survey of musicians’ knowledge, access to and use of musical ergonomics in professional UK orchestras.

Hello my name is Teresa Airley, and I would like to invite musicians’ aged 18 years or over, working in professional UK-based orchestras, to participate in a voluntary and anonymous survey on musical ergonomics.  I am undertaking an MSc in performing arts medicine at University College London, and I am interested in learning what motivates musicians to use ergonomic aids.

What are ergonomics? Ergonomics are aids that support musicians within their working environment.  These can be instrument specific adaptations to help reduce playing discomfort, or improve playing posture.  For example chin or thumb rests, or straps to support instrument weight and maintain good posture.  Or, advice on healthy practice such as posture, warm-ups, stretches, and regular breaks.  Environmental ergonomics include appropriate seating, lighting, and hearing protection within performing venues.

Why is this study being done?  Musicians are at risk of developing playing-related injuries.  Education on healthy practice and use of ergonomic aids can help to reduce, or prevent injuries.  My survey explores what motivates musicians to use ergonomic aids, and how knowledge of musical ergonomics is acquired, and what benefits or barriers there are to using ergonomics at work.

Consent: Completing the survey implies consent to participate in this research study, and as participation is anonymous it will not be possible to withdraw your data once you have completed your questionnaire.

How and what data will be collected, and where will it be stored? This survey is anonymous and all information you provide is confidential.   No individuals will be identified in any reports arising from this research.  The survey is available via Opinio and all data gathered is held securely within University College London data centres.  This project has been approved by the UCL Research Ethics Committee.

Contact information: If you would like more information regarding the study please email me direct at teresa.airley.15@ucl.ac.uk Please visit the British Association for Performing Arts Medicine (BAPAM) website at www.bapam.org.uk for further information on specialist health support available to performing artists.  Free specialist medical advice is available from BAPAM.  For enquiries telephone: 020 7404 8444 or email: info@bapam.org.uk

Access the survey here

Thank you for your time.

Solo Pop Singers: How do you feel about your wellbeing in the music industry?

February 1st, 2017

 

Professional singers invited to take part in new research project at the Royal College of Music

Are you a professional solo singer in popular music genres including pop, rock, dance, jazz, blues and folk?

Would you like to help develop our understanding of health and wellbeing experiences in the music industry, and inform future support networks?

Lucinda Heyman, a Performance Science researcher at the Royal College of Music, is looking for professional solo singers, signed to a record label or making a living from singing, to be interviewed for a new project. You don’t need to have experienced a health problem to take part. The research covers positive as well as challenging experiences. You may feel that your work in music has positive effects on your health, for instance.

If you are interested in taking part you can contact Lucinda directly by emailing lucinda.heyman@rcm.ac.uk

She will explain the project and provide you with a detailed participant information sheet.

Any information you provide will remain confidential. The project has Research Ethics Committee approval from Conservatoires UK.

Induction Day: An Introduction to Performer Health and BAPAM’s Work

January 20th, 2017

London, National Council For Voluntary Organisations
Saturday 22 April

10:00 - 16:00

BAPAM is a specialist medical charity providing performing arts focused clinical advice, free information resources, education and training expertise, supporting research in the field, and working with a growing network of healthcare professionals through our Directory of Practitioners. Our Induction Days provide an informal introduction to this work and are a great opportunity to find out more about BAPAM, network with colleagues and  share insights into performer health issues and support.

Presentations include talks from BAPAM team members, doctors and therapists working in BAPAM clinics, and performing arts professionals who have experienced problems and benefited from our help.

Attendance is free for healthcare practitioners who are joining our clinical team or have been accepted as members of our Directory of Practitioners. We also welcome (for a small fee) other participants including educators, industry members, researchers and performers. Paying attendees who go on to join our Directory or clinical team will have their fee refunded.

Advance booking is essential.

Book your place now.