Archive for the ‘BAPAM’ Category

A major event in Occupational Health

Tuesday, March 19th, 2019

Are you a freelance performer, regularly working on short contracts and short-term engagements? BAPAM in collaboration with the Occupational Medicine Department of the Royal Society of Medicine is organising an event looking at Occupational health in the performing arts. The industry is commonly termed the original gig economy as a huge proportion of the workforce are composed of freelance performers. There is also unfortunately a high number likely to become injured or have other health problems as a result of their work.

In traditional settings occupational health teams keep people well at work – physically and mentally. But when it comes to the gig economy the healthcare support for a performer may not be as certain.

Amongst other things this event on 27th March 2019 will be looking at the health and work needs of the self-employed, especially those working in this gig economy. As well as the current needs and experiences of performers when they are faced with ill health and also performance-related injury and how they can be treated back in to work.

Click here to book on to the event which promises to be a very useful day for all performers and clinicians working with performers.

  • Interested in finding out more about occupational health and performing arts, there is a collection of resources on the subject on the Society of Occupational Medicine website.

 

Surge in demand for backstage therapists due to pressures of social media

Thursday, September 13th, 2018

The pressures of performing in today’s social media culture means more and more therapists are working backstage to support performers in need according to an article in the Sunday Telegraph.

BAPAM registered psychotherapist Helen Brice who is featured in the article, says she is getting more requests for her services due to the fear of a blunder going viral within moments.

She says the emergency sessions which she gets called out for involve calming exercises to reduce a performer’s anxiety. According to her other factors affecting performers at the moment includes a demand to tour frequently, falling incomes and the need to stand out in a hugely competitive industry.

Helen has worked for more than twenty years in the music business in the areas of performance, production, publishing, artist management and classical music. She says over the last couple years people have started to become aware that the mistakes they make may be spotted and commented about on online within seconds. This possibility is becoming the source of more anxiety and is adding to the pressure to always say the right thing and avoid any thing that may be deemed inappropriate.

Her work backstage involves supporting clients with breathing exercises, using low energy techniques or more dynamic work depending on what the client needs the most at that time. The kinds of people Helen has helped includes musicians on the orchestral circuit as well as pop and classical artists and more recently, grime artists.