Archive for the ‘Musicians’ Category

Training Event for Music Teachers – Promoting Health and Well-Being in Music Lessons

Wednesday, December 11th, 2013

10.00 – 17.00, Sunday 19th January 2014
Royal Northern College of Music

 

Naomi Norton, BAPAM Student Advocate Scheme Manager and PhD student at the Royal Northern College of Music, would like to invite you to attend a training event to be held at the RNCM on Sunday 19th January 2014.

This event is open to all musicians and other interested parties, although sessions will focus on the music lesson environment and therefore are likely to be most relevant to instrumental and vocal teachers (all ages, instruments and genres).

Attendance at the event costs only £28, with a further £3 discount available to any individuals who have participated in Naomi’s previous research study (available here).

Registration for the event will open at 9.30am and sessions will run from 10.00 – 16.00 on Sunday 19th January 2014; optional focus group discussions will take place following the event from 16.15 – 17.00

To book your place please contact Naomi Norton by email naomi.norton@student.rncm.ac.uk

More information is available via the RNCM Box Office.

The day aims to provide practical information regarding how to avoid or manage performance-related problems and how to pass this information on to instrumental/vocal pupils.

Sessions:

Performance-related problems Drusilla Redman
Health support Deborah Charnock
String Specialist Christine Harrison
Performance Anxiety Carol Chapman
Psycho-Physical Re-Education Alison Loram
Vocal Specialist Ian MacDonald
Wind and Brass Specialist Andrew Roberts
Performance Coaching Karen O’Connor
Focus group sessions Volunteer delegates and speakers

See RNCM Box Office page for speaker biographies

Event Sponsors: The British Association for Performing Arts Medicine, Ton Kooiman, Mundo Music Gear, The Pegmate

PLEASE NOTE: This event has been organised by Naomi as part of her research therefore all sessions will be recorded and attendees will be treated as research participants and required to sign a consent form at registration on the day; all data collected at the event will be kept confidential and published anonymously. The research elements of the day have received approval from the RNCM Research Ethics Committee.

Event Report: Performers in their Environment Training Day

Thursday, November 28th, 2013

Our November 2013 event brought together actors and musicians with professionals working in performing arts healthcare, education and support and welfare, for a stimulating investigation into the work, lifestyle and health realities of the industry.

Professor of Performance Science, Aaron Williamon, discussed musicians’ hearing and the tricky issue of noise regulations for workers for whom noise is their product.

Philip Turner, Senior Stage Manager of the English National Opera, shared valuable expertise and insights into the considerations of caring for performers, crew, and audience, and in supervising the work environment, both at the ENO in London, and on touring productions. Osteopath, Jennie Morton, presented on workplace hazards, drawing from her work as a performer (dance/theatre/singing).

Former professional oboist turned pioneering Performance Coach, Karen O’Connor, was joined by a singer and a double bassist to discuss novel applications of sport psychology for managing performance anxiety and developing mental toughness.

We also heard from professional performers about the ups and downs of their careers. Jungle Drummer, Chris Polglase, talked us through his career, from leaving music school in frustration at course requirements that he learn endless indie rock parts, to turning a hobby into a sustained professional career playing 180bpm drum & bass beats, alongside turntablists and musicians from a diverse spectrum of styles. Chris talked about the pressures of extensive touring, playing 5am gigs at clubs and festivals, studio sessions, and gradually learning self confidence and how to care for yourself.

Bringing a fascinating day to a close, David Sulkin, Chief Executive of the Musicians Benevolent Fund, interviewed two actors at very different stages of their careers – covering the stresses (physical, emotional and financial) and rewards of the profession.

We’d like to thank all the speakers, performers and attendees.  All agreed that first hand discussion with performing arts professionals proved especially valuable in providing perspective for those who seek to help care for their health and welfare. Thanks also to the Musicians’ Union for so generously providing the venue.

More information about our Training Days can be found here: BAPAM Training Days.

Research: How Musicians Experience Forms of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT)

Tuesday, October 22nd, 2013

Call for Participants: 

 

Ellis Pecen is a Masters student in Performance Science at the Royal College of Music, interested in exploring how musicians experience forms of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT). To do this, a short anonymous online survey has been developed that should take about 15-20 minutes to complete. In this survey you will be asked anonymous questions about your musical background and your experiences with CBT. The research has received ethical approval from the Conservatoires UK Research Ethics Committee.

Who can take part?

The recruitment criteria for taking part are:

1. That you are a musician (or former musician) with experiences with CBT. You can be a student, professional or a musician who plays as part of a hobby, regardless of age or experience.

2. That you are undergoing or have undergone CBT treatment. There are many approaches to CBT and many forms of delivery (e.g. private/group counselling, computerized CBT, CBT via self-help methods etc.). All forms are valid for the purposes of this research, yet in order to ensure a consistent definition of CBT we are interested in interventions that adhere to the following characteristics:

i. CBT is based on the theory that our thoughts determine our feelings and behaviour and that, therefore, changing the way we think allows us to change the way we feel and behave.

ii. CBT is problem-focused and goal-oriented. The emphasis is on the ‘now’ and the future rather than the past.

iii. CBT requires active participation from clients in the form of homework assignments designed to apply the acquired skills from the sessions to real-life situations.

iv. Clients are educated about their symptoms and are made aware of strategies to enable positive change

How do I take part?

If you feel that you meet the above criteria and would like to complete the anonymous survey, please follow this link: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/GHVPSZX

If you have any further questions about the research, feel free to contact Ellis at ellis.pecen@rcm.ac.uk

Thank you for taking the time to read through this information and considering participating in the research. You help is most appreciated!

 

Musicians’ Union Wellbeing Week

Monday, July 22nd, 2013

The Musicians’ Union, with input from BAPAM and the Musicians Benevolent Fund, hold a Wellbeing Week for their members in August.

Wellbeing sessions take place in London and Birmingham, and for those unable to attend corporeally, there is also the option to join in via Skype transmission.

Sessions will cover healthy practice, posture, stress, life-coaching, yoga, and more.

This is a fantastic opportunity to benefit from the experience and wisdom of a range of professionals who work with musicians enabling them to have healthier and happier lifestyles.

 

Click here for all the information.

 

Research into Musicians’ Approaches to Musical Practice

Wednesday, June 19th, 2013

Emese Hruska, a PhD researcher at the University of Roehampton, is recruiting London based musicians to help her look at musicians’ attitudes and experiences towards their musical practice.

This current project is part of her PhD research, and it involves interviewing  musicians regarding their experiences and views about their musicianship , their musical and individual identity. Interviews will take about 1 hour, and can be arranged at a suitable location chosen by the participating musician to express his/her thoughts and feelings freely. Participants must be based in London.

Emese’s long term goal is that the findings will contribute to developments in preventing and/or managing problems related to music performance anxiety and perfectionism in musicians. On completion of the project, Emese intends to equip musicians with adaptable empowerment strategies for strength, persistence, positivity, autonomy etc.

If you are interested in taking part, please contact Emese directly by email: hruskae@roehampton.ac.uk

This project has been approved by the Research Ethics Committee at the University of Roehampton.

The results of the project will be shared with BAPAM, and we’ll report back at a future date.

 

Health, Injury and Prevention Workshop for Musicians

Monday, June 10th, 2013

Kathy Whitehouse, cellist and cello teacher with a special interest in posture and injury prevention, has organised this interactive workshop for musicians covering common playing related injuries; particularly the hand, shoulder and back; how they may be prevented and treated.

Guest speaker: Mr Ian Winspur

Mr Ian Winspur is a Consultant Plastic and Hand Surgeon, who has focused his interests and specialisation in Hand Surgery and the management of complex hand problems. He has a specialist interest in the musician’s hand and has helped many professional musicians to maintain comfortable performance and continued careers in the face of hand conditions or post-trauma. Mr Winspur is co-author of The Musician’s Hand with BAPAM’s Dr Christopher Wynn Parry.

Dr Simon Shaw: GP, specialist registrar in rehabilitation medicine, dancer and movement practitioner

Dr James Inklebarger: Tutor in Osteopathy and Specialist in Exercise and Sports Medicine

Kathy Whitehouse, LLCM: Cellist, Cello teacher with a special interest in posture and injury prevention

June 22nd 2013, 2 – 5 pm

London College of Osteopathic Medicine
8 / 10 Boston Place
London
NW1 6QH

Cost £35

Musicians, please take your instrument

Booking: 0207 262 1128

Bookings limited to 15 places

Please note this event is not organised by BAPAM

 

Event Report – State of Play 2013

Monday, April 8th, 2013

Event organiser, Ian MacDonald, reports on the State of Play – A study day for performers, healthcare practitioners, music teachers, manufacturers and modifiers of musical instruments,  23rd March 2013. 

This mini-conference was inspired by all the wonderful inventions, additions and props created by passionate musicians, teachers and practitioners to assist their performing. Though for some, the process of amending and/or adjusting ‘the musical interface’ (the instrument) is second nature – better facilitating them to do what they love – it strikes me that it is still generally considered a black art.

Where adapting the traditional instrument dimensions in a bespoke manner really comes into its own, is in helping youngsters play instruments without injury and in helping musicians recover from injury and accident. There is also amazing work being done with disabled children and adults at places like www.joyofsound.net, creating guitars that have special vibrating panels for deaf people, cellos that are fixed and angled to make wheelchair approach possible, two-way zithers that have double docking space for two wheelchair users to sit at it etc.

Playing aids, props, straps, rests etc are of course of interest to clinicians and practitioners working with performers but often either practitioners don’t know specific items exist, or have seen products on the web but are not sure how they work in practice or indeed if they actually work safely as empirical evidence supporting the marketing claims is difficult to find.

State of Play delegates were a mixture of professional performers, conservatoire teachers, students, lecturers, researchers, healthcare professionals, musicians and a dancer. A number had suffered some form of nerve compression problem in the past so had a vested interest in the presenting subject. Across the board, feedback about the day was positive with particular pleasure from all in seeing a right-handed trumpet being taken apart by Dave Woodhead then reassembled for a left-handed player with cable ties in about 5 minutes; perfectly playable with no need for any new bits to be made. Dave explained to us that there is no limit to adjustments you can make to brass instruments. Materials can be changed for look, weight or to avoid allergic reaction. Crooks (U-shaped bits of the tubing) and the direction of tubing can be shaped and amended to suit hand size, arm length, neck length or to assist getting back to playing again post-trauma….in fact there is now a small plastic trombone on the market that is light and easier to control even if you are a small person of 6 or 7. And it sounds okay too!

Marcus Reynolds presented his invention, Stratos, demonstrating it with a nifty trombone solo. He has worked on the Stratos for many years, since a serious accident left him injured. The device is used to facilitate better lip, jaw and head posture for trombonist (and for all other brass instrumentalists) as well as to provide structural and stabilising support. It was great news to hear that he is now getting commissions from all over the country to reward him for the dedicated years, time, money and sheer genius of creation.

The afternoon gave us the duet of Nicole Wilson and Helena Wood, violinists with ENO Orchestra. All the delegates agreed that these two musicians could go on the road with a fantastic presentation covering their experience in the working environment, ergonomics, musicianship, technical expertise, knowledge of the great variety of available equipment (e.g. chin and neck rests, seating) and their extremely funny way of communicating all these ideas.

Guitar tutor, Paul Sogaard rounded off the day, expertly reviewing the different posture issues faced by the three main designs of guitar, acoustic, electric and bass. As a long time member of the BAPAM Directory of Performing Arts Medicine Practitioners, he focused on many of the ergonomic problems tackled by musicians, demonstrating the various adjustments to the guitar interface and discussing the eternal questions of what additional tools and equipment (if any) to use… Again, research into the long term health benefits of using foot stool, neck straps or ergoplay support is sparse.

Student Research Projects

The day also included representatives from the first year of the MSc in Performing Arts Medicine with presentations from Efthalia Palaiokastriti, Physiotherapist and guitarist (Investigating functional scoliosis in guitarists using different guitar support tools), Isabel Artigues Cano, Physiotherapist and flautist (Evaluating hypermobility of finger joints in flautists) and Dr Hara Trouli’s (Performance measures in pianists with clinical sympomatology in the upper limbs: a cross-sectional study using EMG, digital pianos recordings and video postural analysis).

Jacqueline du Pré Concert – 5 March

Tuesday, February 26th, 2013

A special evening in aid of the Musicians Benevolent Fund at Wigmore Hall

The Jacqueline du Pré concerts are held annually to perpetuate the memory of Jacqueline du Pré, one of the greatest cellists of her generation, who died of multiple sclerosis at the age of 42. Since 1996 these concerts have raised money for different musical and medical charities. This year the concert is held in aid of the Musicians Benevolent Fund.

The funds raised will be dedicated to the Fund’s Jacqueline du Pré Special Fund which supports musicians with a serious disability. The Fund currently helps more than thirty musicians with MS, other degenerative diseases or spinal cord injuries.

Book tickets here

Taubman Approach Symposium

Tuesday, February 5th, 2013

The Golandsky Institute present a symposium on the Taubman Approach, an instrumental playing technique that many musicians find useful in preventing playing related injuries and in overcoming problems if they do occur. The symposium will cover the application of the technique to both piano and violin.

The Symposium takes place at St John’s College, Cambridge, March 23rd and 24th 2013.

Further information and booking

 

Event: Concert by Cellist who Overcame Shoulder Injury

Tuesday, February 5th, 2013

Cellist, Corinne Morris, who struggled with a debilitating shoulder injury for over 5 years, will be recording a CD of Britten and Poulenc works with the highly regarded BBC radio editor and producer Jeremy Hayes. This recording is being made possible by donations from fans and institutions and Corinne is presenting a fund-raising concert this coming Sunday 10 February in a beautiful house in Barnes. The concert/presentation of the project will be at 3pm and refreshments will be served after the event.

If you’d like to attend please email: corinne@corinnemorris.com.