Archive for the ‘Research’ Category

Research: The Wellbeing of Musicians Across the Lifespan

Thursday, October 5th, 2017

Musicians sometimes spend a lot of time looking at what is wrong, which can give more energy to challenges and create a downward spiral. Positive psychology is influenced by the idea that in spending more time focusing on what’s right, we allow ourselves to consider what it looks like to do well, which can in turn lead to a more positive physical/mental/emotional outworking.

Marie El-Khazen is a researcher inviting musicians aged 60+ to take part in interviews which will help develop knowledge and understanding of musicians’ perception of wellbeing as a performer, throughout a lifelong professional career.

If you’d like to help with this study you need to be aged 60+, having earned the majority of your full time income from employment as a performing musician. Interviews lasting 60 – 90 minutes will be conducted face to face, or via Skype, and will be recorded (on a dictaphone). Participants will remain anonymous. To take part or to find out more, please contact Marie directly by emailing U1620023@uel.ac.uk. You can also find here a detailed participant invitation letter.

This research has been approved by the School of Psychology Research Ethics Committee, and follows the standard of research ethics set by the British Psychological Society.

International Symposium in Performance Science, Reykjavik

Thursday, September 28th, 2017

The MSc in Performing Arts Medicine and BAPAM were well represented this month at the International Symposium in Performance Science (ISPS) in Reykjavik, Iceland, with research papers by Dr Trish Halliwell, Dr Philippa Whebble, Dr Farrah Jawad, Dr Hara Trouli, osteopath Tommi Sliiden and physiotherapists Kari Arnason, Lindsay Wallace and Krzystoff Dabrowski. Projects on flautists’ injuries, breathing relaxation for singers, vitamin D levels in dancers, health issues of popular musicians, lung function when singing and dancing, muscle injuries in string players, footwear and dancers’ injuries, and palmaris longus in pianists were received with great interest by the conference delegates. It is important to see such a group on the international arena of Performing Arts Medicine and we hope this will encourage more researchers to bring their work to this level. Congratulations to all involved!

Research: A Survey of Musicians’ Perceived Readiness for the Profession

Thursday, August 31st, 2017

Are you an adult musician who graduated from conservatoire 5 years ago or less? If so, researcher, Ellis Pecen would be interested to hear your opinions in a short anonymous online survey about how prepared you feel for the profession. You will be asked to rate yourself on several skills and how important you find them.

Ellis, a graduate from the Royal College of Music and currently a PhD candidate at the University of Central Lancashire, is researching recent music graduates’ perceived readiness for the profession.

The survey should take about 10 minutes to complete.  It has been approved by the UClan Research Ethics Committee for Business, Arts, Humanities, and Social Science (BAHSS).

Click here to complete the anonymous survey

If you have any further questions about the research, feel free to contact Ellis by email: epecen@uclan.ac.uk

Thank you for considering participating in this research.

Health Education in the Arts Survey

Thursday, May 25th, 2017

Researcher, Lisa Brachfeld, from the MSc Performing Arts Medicine programme at University College London, invites musicians, dancers, actors, and singers who are professionals or students/teachers at accredited conservatoires to participate in a new study of health education in the performing arts. The aim is to prove that performers could benefit from more health and injury prevention education. Learning about attitudes towards this subject will help to improve the effectiveness of education curriculums.

Take the survey here

Alison Loram Muscle Function Research Published

Friday, March 24th, 2017

Alison Loram is a BAPAM-registered Alexander Technique teacher with expertise in the technique’s application to performance and practice, and ergonomics of instrumental playing/singing. She is a graduate of UCL’s Performing Arts Medicine MSc, violinist and research scientist. Her current research work investigates muscle function and motor control, and strategies of changing habits associated with chronic pain, injury and performance limitation.

The first of the papers directly associated with this research has recently been published, and is open-access. You can read the paper here:

Proactive selective inhibition targeted at the neck muscles: this proximal constraint facilitates learning and regulates global control.

Other articles explaining and verifying the techniques used in the experiments and analysis have also been published. For example, the use of ultrasound imaging to determine the change in neck muscle activity was completely novel and so the method had to be set out, explained and the analyses processes, not just of the data but of the images themselves, had to be documented, peer-reviewed and published.

The technical paper Real-Time Ultrasound Segmentation, Analysis and Visualisation of Deep Cervical Muscle Structure is also open access.

Research Published into Ballet Dancers’ Experiences of Injury and Osteopathy

Friday, February 24th, 2017

Osteopath, Toby Pollard-Smith, has published his research into Professional ballet dancers’ experience of injury and osteopathic treatment in the UK  in the January 2017 issue of the Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies. BAPAM helped recruit participants for the project, which Toby undertook while training to be an osteopath.

Toby’s previous career as a professional ballet dancer contributed to his interest and expertise in treating dance injuries, and we were recently pleased to welcome him to our Directory of Practitioners. Toby, who is also a keen trumpet player, treats dancers, musicians and other performing artists in Ascot and Marlow. Find Toby Pollard-Smith on the BAPAM Directory.

Research: Vocal Health Awareness in Singing Students and Teachers

Thursday, February 16th, 2017

Dr Anneliese Sayes is a medical doctor and researcher at the Royal College of Music who is investigating the current knowledge levels of vocal anatomy, physiology and pathology in singing students (within the conservatoire and university systems) and singing teachers.

She is inviting participants to fill in a questionnaire (that should take around 10-15 minutes to complete). There is a separate questionnaire for students and teachers. Full information about the study, which has research ethics approval from Conservatoires UK, is also provided. The survey can be accessed online via the following links:

Vocal Awareness questionnaire for student singers

Vocal Awareness questionnaire for singing teachers

Survey: Musical ergonomics in professional UK orchestras

Thursday, February 9th, 2017

Are you a musician working in a professional UK-based orchestra? Could you help us support research into performer healthcare by completing a short anonymous survey on musical ergonomics?

If so, please read the information below before you complete the survey. The survey should take no more than 5 minutes.

Subject: A survey of musicians’ knowledge, access to and use of musical ergonomics in professional UK orchestras.

Hello my name is Teresa Airley, and I would like to invite musicians’ aged 18 years or over, working in professional UK-based orchestras, to participate in a voluntary and anonymous survey on musical ergonomics.  I am undertaking an MSc in performing arts medicine at University College London, and I am interested in learning what motivates musicians to use ergonomic aids.

What are ergonomics? Ergonomics are aids that support musicians within their working environment.  These can be instrument specific adaptations to help reduce playing discomfort, or improve playing posture.  For example chin or thumb rests, or straps to support instrument weight and maintain good posture.  Or, advice on healthy practice such as posture, warm-ups, stretches, and regular breaks.  Environmental ergonomics include appropriate seating, lighting, and hearing protection within performing venues.

Why is this study being done?  Musicians are at risk of developing playing-related injuries.  Education on healthy practice and use of ergonomic aids can help to reduce, or prevent injuries.  My survey explores what motivates musicians to use ergonomic aids, and how knowledge of musical ergonomics is acquired, and what benefits or barriers there are to using ergonomics at work.

Consent: Completing the survey implies consent to participate in this research study, and as participation is anonymous it will not be possible to withdraw your data once you have completed your questionnaire.

How and what data will be collected, and where will it be stored? This survey is anonymous and all information you provide is confidential.   No individuals will be identified in any reports arising from this research.  The survey is available via Opinio and all data gathered is held securely within University College London data centres.  This project has been approved by the UCL Research Ethics Committee.

Contact information: If you would like more information regarding the study please email me direct at teresa.airley.15@ucl.ac.uk Please visit the British Association for Performing Arts Medicine (BAPAM) website at www.bapam.org.uk for further information on specialist health support available to performing artists.  Free specialist medical advice is available from BAPAM.  For enquiries telephone: 020 7404 8444 or email: info@bapam.org.uk

Access the survey here

Thank you for your time.

Solo Pop Singers: How do you feel about your wellbeing in the music industry?

Wednesday, February 1st, 2017

 

Professional singers invited to take part in new research project at the Royal College of Music

Are you a professional solo singer in popular music genres including pop, rock, dance, jazz, blues and folk?

Would you like to help develop our understanding of health and wellbeing experiences in the music industry, and inform future support networks?

Lucinda Heyman, a Performance Science researcher at the Royal College of Music, is looking for professional solo singers, signed to a record label or making a living from singing, to be interviewed for a new project. You don’t need to have experienced a health problem to take part. The research covers positive as well as challenging experiences. You may feel that your work in music has positive effects on your health, for instance.

If you are interested in taking part you can contact Lucinda directly by emailing lucinda.heyman@rcm.ac.uk

She will explain the project and provide you with a detailed participant information sheet.

Any information you provide will remain confidential. The project has Research Ethics Committee approval from Conservatoires UK.

Dancers Study

Wednesday, November 23rd, 2016

A new international study explores the relationship between physical activity, including dancing, other risk factors (such as diet), and health.

The National Institute of Dance Medicine and Science and the Centre for Sport, Exercise and Osteoarthritis are investigating the long-term effect of these factors and their relation to the risk of disease, including osteoarthritis.

The team are asking participants to complete an online questionnaire, which is anonymous. Taking part is entirely voluntary and if you wish to do so, you are free to withdraw at any time. If you agree to continue you will be asked to complete two more questionnaires which will enable the researchers to get an understanding of how much physical activity/dancing you do and the effects on your overall health, including your lower body joints

The deadline for participation is the 31st of March 2017.

An optional prize draw is available for those who wish to enter.

The link to access the survey is: https://nottingham.onlinesurveys.ac.uk/dance