Archive for the ‘Talks and lectures’ Category

Report: Australian Society of Performing Arts Health Conference 2019

Monday, February 10th, 2020

BAPAM Director, Claire Cordeaux

It was a great privilege to be invited to Sydney to speak at the Australian Society of Performing Arts Health (ASPAH) conference at the end of 2019, and inspiring to hear about the great practice happening in Australia. The conference Lasting the Distance: a Lifetime in the Performing Arts considered physical and psychological approaches to support career longevity. Dr. Sue Mayes, the Australian Ballet’s principal physiotherapist and keynote speaker outlined how their approach to healthcare had minimised injuries over the years, measured by insurance claims – a compelling argument for the value of investing in performance health.

There were some really interesting presentations on dance, from child education to foot adaptation of wearable technology and athlete management systems used by athletes, and developing a career in health after dance. On mental health, identification and intervention in eating disorders and management of music performance anxiety were explored, and Ben Steel, former Home and Away star, movingly discussed his documentary on depression in the performing arts. I presented on our experience of Developing Evidence-Based Policy and Practice in Psychosocial Health in the Performing Arts.

There is a thriving performing arts medicine community in Australia and we were honoured to be part of the discussions, and look forward to a continued relationship. ASPAH has produced a great set of healthcare guides which they have kindly allowed us to share with you: Download ASPAH Healthcare Guides

A major event in Occupational Health

Tuesday, March 19th, 2019

Are you a freelance performer, regularly working on short contracts and short-term engagements? BAPAM in collaboration with the Occupational Medicine Department of the Royal Society of Medicine is organising an event looking at Occupational health in the performing arts. The industry is commonly termed the original gig economy as a huge proportion of the workforce are composed of freelance performers. There is also unfortunately a high number likely to become injured or have other health problems as a result of their work.

In traditional settings occupational health teams keep people well at work – physically and mentally. But when it comes to the gig economy the healthcare support for a performer may not be as certain.

Amongst other things this event on 27th March 2019 will be looking at the health and work needs of the self-employed, especially those working in this gig economy. As well as the current needs and experiences of performers when they are faced with ill health and also performance-related injury and how they can be treated back in to work.

Click here to book on to the event which promises to be a very useful day for all performers and clinicians working with performers.

  • Interested in finding out more about occupational health and performing arts, there is a collection of resources on the subject on the Society of Occupational Medicine website.

 

Occupational Health in the Performing Arts Industry: The Original Gig Economy

Tuesday, February 5th, 2019

 

Wednesday 27th March 
Royal Society of Medicine
London

 

Registration for this event is now open.

Training arts professionals in healthy practice skills is vital, but we believe that healthy individuals also require systematic support from the industry that is built on their work. 

The majority of workers in the performing arts are freelancers and all are likely to, at some point in their career, experience an injury or have other health problems as a result of their work. The particular needs of those in this industry translate to other areas of the national workforce where, with the expansion of the ‘gig-economy’, traditional occupational health provision increasingly may not reach. 

The Occupational Medicine Section of the Royal Society of Medicine and the British Association for Performing Arts Medicine have therefore come together to run a one day educational meeting that will be of interest to a wide range of people with an interest in health and work.

Talks and panels feature leading arts industry and occupational health experts, academics and clinicians, and include consideration of the economic case for investing in health, health promotion, injury prevention and rehabilitation for self-employed workers, key and emerging occupational health issues in the arts sector.

Contributors include:

Professor Aaron Williamon, Royal College of Music, Centre for Performance Science

Zeb Soanes, BBC Radio 4 presenter

Jane Dyball, CEO of Music Publishers Association Group, winner of Music Week Women in Music Award for Outstanding Contribution

Professor Emma Redding, Head of Dance Science, Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music and Dance

Colin Thomas, Chief Medical Officer, BBC

Colonel John Etherington, Director of Defence Rehabilitation and Consultant in Rheumatology and Rehabilitation, Defence Medical Rehabilitation Centre

More information and registration

BAPAM Performance Environment Day

Tuesday, November 6th, 2018

What would an ideal performance environment look like? Is such a thing even possible when we work in such widely different spaces? How do our environments affect our health, our creativity, our social relationships? What can healthcare professionals, technicians, artists, support organisations and communities do to both support performing arts wellbeing and facilitate excellence in artistic practice?

Our Performance Environment Day explores these topics, from a healthcare perspective and including the experiences of other professionals including artists, technicians, educators and people working in arts support roles, some with additional needs due to illness, injury, difference or disability

You can now read the full programme.

The event takes place at Resource for London on November 17, 9.30 – 17.00.

Tickets are available here.

 


Presentations and Discussion

The Performance Environment: Challenges in the Performing Arts Industry
Sophie Lane, Specialist Performing Arts and Sport Physiotherapist

Saving Your Ears for the Music!
Gladys Akinseye and Jordon Thompson, Clinical Audiologists and Hearing Therapists

Preparing for Challenging Performance Careers
Arran Peck, Athletic Development and Conditioning Coach, National Centre for Circus Arts

Cognitive Function of Adult Amateur Pianists
Dr Marie McKavanagh, GP, MSc Performing Arts Medicine Shipley Rudge Award Winner

Anxiety and Psychological Support for Theatre Productions and Artists
Dr Anna Colton, Chartered Clinical Psychologist

Panel Discussion/Q&A

Do our performance environments facilitate or obstruct artistic practice? How can the ways in which we design, manage, use and share space be a positive factor in healthy practice? Collective support in creative communities, accessibility and participation.

Kris Halpin, Musician/Producer
Robin Townley, CEO Association of British Theatre Technicians
Lisa Tregale, Head of BSO Participate, Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra
Siân Willett, Co-creator of Wellbeing for the Arts

Dan Hayhurst, BAPAM Information Coordinator (Chair)

Listen to the experts on World Mental Health Day 2018

Wednesday, October 10th, 2018

At BAPAM we work with mental health specialists who have the knowledge and experience to help performing arts clients.

On 17th November, Clinical Psychologist Dr Anna Colton will be speaking at our training day about the Performance Environment, covering anxiety, how it affects performance, and how she works with adults and children in West End shows. You can listen to Anna discussing the challenges that arise for workers in this industry, her background and her wider work as a psychologist in our interview below, and you can book tickets for our Performance Environment Training Day here.

 

Music promoter Skiddle chairs mental health panel

Friday, October 5th, 2018

BAPAM Director Claire Cordeaux was invited to be part of a panel at an event organised by music event promoter Skiddle. The panel discussion was titled mental health in the music industry and was organised off the back of a survey the promoter had conducted amongst professionals within the industry, looking at their mental health at work.

Other panelists included Christine Brown from Help Musicians UK and psychotherapist and former music producer and DJ Matt Cantor along with some other music promoters.

The survey found mental health problems were a big issue amongst this demographic. According to the survey 82 per cent of those working in the industry said they suffered stress, 67 per cent suffered from anxiety and 40 per cent from depression.

65 per cent of the promoters frequently felt an intense and an unmanageable level or pressure and almost 50 per cent said the music work often led to a constant level of anxiety and sadness.

Speaking on the panel Claire Cordeaux said, “Promoters don’t get the visibility that other groups get even though the survey shows that they experience similar sorts of issues. So the results aren’t that surprising as they are probably not getting the same sort of access to support that other parts of the industry are getting.”

Here’s the full discussion:

OPACA Study Day: Osteopathic Approach to the “Singing Voice”

Monday, September 4th, 2017

The Osteopathic Performing Arts Care Association (OPACA) present their second study day in Manchester on Sunday 15 October, focusing on Voice, and led by osteopath, singer and teacher, Ashley Staffiord.

To book online please visit: www.opaca.co.uk

OPACA aims to foster a uniquely Osteopathic perspective of treating performing artists, to encourage new ideas and offer mutual support. New members are welcome.

“A practical and experiential workshop for osteopaths with a special interest in the power of the voice. This full day’s programme will include practical work with bodybreath-voice relationship: exploration of the diaphragms and the relationship between primary and thoracic respiration and the many influences upon the functionality of the voice from head to toe. It will include a review of the anatomy and neurology of the vocal apparatus and demonstrations with singers. Participants will leave with a clear view of how to approach the voice of the patient osteopathically and with minimum trauma in the interventions”.

International Conference on Performing Arts Medicine (ICPAM) 2018

Wednesday, July 26th, 2017

BAPAM is pleased to be taking part in the forthcoming ICPAM Conference, which will be held 29 – 31 March 2018 in the Hague. Initiated by the Hague Medical Centre and Dutch Performing Arts Medicine Association, the conference brings an international perspective to both music and dance medicine. Collaborators include ASPAH, BAPAM, CeiMArs, CND,  DGfMM, DHF, IADMS, Médecine des Arts, ÖGfMM, PAMA, NIDMS, SMM, tamed and UNISA.

Intending to share state of the art medical scientific knowledge on the topics of dance, music, voice, hearing and mind, the organisers now welcome abstracts for oral presentations as well as poster presentations.

Abstract deadline extended t0 December 1st, 2017 23:59 CET

You can find out more and submit an abstract for ICPAM 2018 here.

Registration for the conference will open soon.

Osteopathic Performing Arts Care Association Study Day

Wednesday, March 29th, 2017

The Osteopathic Performing Arts Care Association (OPACA) are a group of osteopaths who have a special interest in the care of performers. Members include BAPAM registered osteopaths Michael Mehta, Karolin Krell, Nikki Ellis, David Propert, Alison Judah, Toby Pollard-Smith and Lazarus Nono.

Presented by dancer and choreographer, Russel Maliphant, and Osteopath, Andrew ferguson, the first OPACA Symposium and study day, The Dancer’s Body: Integrity and Fluidity, will be held on Saturday May 6th at the General Osteopathic Council in London.

Find out more here.

Musician’s Focal Dystonia Presentation by MSc students in Performing Arts Medicine

Friday, March 3rd, 2017

Wednesday 22/03/17 6pm
Royal London Hospital for Integrated Medicine
Please confirm attendance with Nicholas.Straiton@uclh.nhs.uk