Archive for the ‘MSc/Diploma in Performing Arts Medicine’ Category

BAPAM Journal Relaunch

Monday, June 24th, 2013

After nearly eight years, we are happy to announce the re-introduction of The Journal of The British Association for Performing Arts Medicine, covering a broad spectrum of topics related to clinical research, education and healthy practice within performing arts medicine.

The new Journal is a free online publication. You can download it in pdf format here: The BAPAM Journal Issue 1 June 2013. We recommend right-clicking and saving the file to your computer.

We encourage our readers to assist us by contributing articles, letters and email responses. Our contact details and further information can be found on the contents page of the Journal. We know that there are many of you working in, studying or fascinated by this specialism, and we hope to open a new channel of communication.

The State of Play 2013 – Musical Instrument Day

Thursday, February 14th, 2013

Saturday 23rd March

10:00-17:00
(Registration from 09:30)
Saturday 23rd March

The Old Refectory, Wilkins Building, Main Quadrangle, University College London WC1E 6BT

A study day for performers, healthcare practitioners, music teachers, manufacturers and modifiers of musical instruments

Enhancing performance and facilitating healthier practice

Bespoke instrument modifications and manufacturing technology

Investigating tools for musicians’ rehabilitation from injury

Configuring the musical interface for healthy performance

Musical instrument ergonomics 

Sessions focusing on brass, strings and guitar

Full Day £75 Half Day £40

BAPAM Practitioner £65

Students £50

To reserve your place please email admin@bapam.org.uk and we’ll send you a booking form. 

More information: State of Play Instrument Day Programme

Photo: MFHiatt

Performing Arts Medicine MSc Research

Tuesday, October 16th, 2012

Performing Arts Medicine MSc research student, Michael Durtnall, is undertaking a project to evaluate a safe ultrasound and laser system for measuring the impact of playing activity on bone health.

If you are over 18 and have been involved in music training from a young age, the project requires attending a 10 minute appointment involving leg measurements. Appointments will take place on Saturday 27th October 2012 from  9.30 am to 5.30 pm at BAPAM in London.

If you would like to participate, please contact Michael by emailing ines@sayerclinics.com or call 020 7937 8978.

Project supervised by Research Fellow, Ian MacDonald.

Note: This project is part of an MSc research thesis at UCL (University College London), has official ethics approval and is covered by UCL’s data protection protocol. The research is not being conducted by BAPAM.

Musical Instrument Appeal

Monday, September 24th, 2012

Photo: Paul J S

BAPAM needs new (old) toys! We’re putting out a request for donations of unwanted musical instruments – of any kind (though we don’t have room for a Wurlitzer) – Brass, Woodwind, Strings, Percussion. Even parts of instruments and broken instruments:

Unwanted
Old
Broken
Stringless
Chin rest without the instrument
Without mouthpieces
Damaged pads

We help musicians with medical problems caused by or affecting their playing. Our doctors need to see how musicians’ bodies work with their instruments, honing our expertise in instrument ergonomics, and our understanding of their composition and construction.

BAPAM has a key role in training medical practitioners through the Performing Arts Medicine MSc qualification at University College London.  Getting to grips with these occasionally obscure implements is an integral part of the MSc learning experience. We need Performing Arts Medicine specialists to know their autoharp from their euphonium.

Photo: Kaensu

So can you help us? Do you have old, unloved musical instruments taking up space in your life? Email Ian.Macdonald@bapam.org.uk and we’ll gratefully give them a new home.

Violinists and Viola Players Research

Thursday, May 10th, 2012

Violinists and viola players – would you like to find out more about how to optimise your playing?

Photo: Mel B.

Postgraduate student and violinist, Dr Alison Loram, is looking for student, professional and amateur violinists and viola players for her study.

The study, in collaboration with University College London and Manchester Metropolitan University, aims to understand more about the neuromuscular aspects of playing the violin/viola, and the effects that these may have upon musculoskeletal and other playing-related problems.

Alison believes that violinists and viola players taking part will benefit from the insights gained: “You will have the opportunity to see how your neck and shoulder muscles are involved in holding and playing your instrument, the bodily movements you make, and how these may be optimised to enhance your playing and reduce/prevent muscular tension”.

The study is open to any student, professional or experienced amateur (regardless of whether or not you have playing-related problems), and will involve attending one individual 2-hour session during May, July/August or September.  The confidential session (to be held at Manchester Metropolitan University in Manchester City Centre near to the Royal Northern College of Music), will involve standing and playing your instrument for very short periods whilst your muscular activity and movements are recorded and analysed using ultrasound scanning and movement analysis equipment.  No preparation is required.

Participation is voluntary and you can leave the research at any time. If you agree to participate in the study, you will be given a detailed information sheet and a consent form.

For further details or to sign up for the study, please contact Dr Alison Loram directly by emailing alison@loram8.freeserve.co.uk

Please share this article amongst any family, friends or colleagues you think may be interested in participating.

Note: This research project is not being conducted by BAPAM. The project has official ethics approval from UCL (University College of London) and is covered by UCL’s data protection protocol.

Pianists Research

Wednesday, April 25th, 2012

Pianists, are you interested in taking part in research into arm tension and other painful conditions? 

Medical doctor and pianist, Dr Hara Trouli, is looking for advanced students and professional pianists to take part in this project. Dr Trouli explains:

I am a medical doctor and a pianist, currently also a student of the first Masters Degree on Performing Arts Medicine at University College London that was developed by BAPAM (British Association of Performing Arts Medicine) in collaboration with the Royal College of Music and Trinity Laban.  I am conducting research on pianists’ arm tension and other painful conditions under the supervision of Professor Howard Bird who is a UK specialist in performers’ health.

We need to see advanced students or professional pianists who have suffered at some point a medical or painful condition (either diagnosed or not) of the upper limb or the cervical spine (hands, wrist, arms or neck) and analyse their piano playing through a triple method of video/ MIDI/ Electromyography.

The idea is to see whether these conditions show signs on the graphs of muscle tension in the arms and neck (electromyography), velocity, force and articulation of piano playing (MIDI) and on postural images of the hand and arm (video). We are aiming to bridge the technical pianistic accomplishment with the clinical history and to measure parameters that would be reproducible and available to both the pianists and the doctors for evaluation. We are also trying to see whether these parameters can be used in monitoring the progress of the pianist during recovery from a painful condition or an injury, and to also enable the pianist to use this method as biofeedback when they re-train.

The assessment of each pianist lasts 2 hours, it takes place in a studio in North London and travel expenses are covered up to £10.00.   Full information and consent sheets will be given to you before your assessment. We would need to see you in April or May and appointments can be made for any weekday or the weekends. We will also be pleased to share the results of your assessment with you and send you a full report of the recorded images. All information that we will receive from you is kept strictly confidential.

Please contact Dr Trouli directly if you’d like to get involved: haratrouli@googlemail.com  

Photo by David Denicolò

BAPAM Newsletter April 2012

Thursday, April 12th, 2012

Our April 2012 Newsletter is now available to download in pdf format here:

BAPAM Newsletter April 2012

 

Guitarists Research

Tuesday, February 21st, 2012

Guitarists, are you interested in taking part in research into guitar support tools and the curvature of your spine while playing?

Postgraduate UCL student, Efthalia Paleokastriti, is looking for classical and acoustic guitarists for her study.

Efthalia believes that guitarists taking part will benefit from the insights gained: “You will have the opportunity to test your guitar playing using different support tools and you may decide which is better for you. Moreover, you may be more informed about the “right” posture of the body while holding the guitar and about ergonomic playing”.

Efthalia explains the project and how you can get involved:

Dear Guitarist,

I am investigating functional scoliosis in guitarists using different guitar support tools.

This involves a temporary change of spinal curvature caused by a provocative factor – in this case, playing the guitar.

I am looking for guitarists to participate in the research project. Specifically, classical or acoustic guitarists (who use a footstool or ergo play guitar support equipment) and who are professionals or experienced guitar players (3 years or more).

The research includes:

  1. answering an anonymous questionnaire (questions about guitar playing habits/pain occurrence/use of guitar support tools).
  2. arrangement of a meeting in which we will take photos of your back while you hold the guitar and use guitar tools.

Participating in this research will be beneficial for you because you will learn more about ergonomic playing and you will try different guitar support equipment.

Participation is voluntary and you can leave the research at any time. If you agree to participate in the study, you will be given a detailed information sheet and a consent form. If you have any queries about our project do not hesitate to contact me.

We are looking forward to hearing from you.

Please read the Information Sheet which includes a detailed description of the project.

And please complete and return the Anonymous Questionnaire – you can answer it even if you decide not to participate in the measurement part of the research.

Contact details: EFTHALIA PALAIOKASTRITI. Email: thaliapaleo@gmail.com

Note: This research project is not being conducted by BAPAM. The project has official ethics approval from UCL (University College of London) and is covered by UCL’s  data protection protocol.

BAPAM Newsletter February 2012

Wednesday, February 1st, 2012

Our current Newsletter is available to download in pdf format here:

BAPAM Newsletter February 2012

 

BAPAM November Training Day Programme

Tuesday, November 15th, 2011

Our November 19th Training Event focusses on Long Term Health Issues Affecting Performing Artists with presentations covering:

Sensory Motor Release (GP/Physio)

Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation of Disabled, Elderly and Multi-talented Performers (Rheumatologist)

Chronic Pain (Rheumatologist)

Ageing and Performance Q&A with Gabrielle Hamilton (actor), Fergus Early (dancer) and Catherine Butler Smith (musician)

Plus, performing arts medicine practitioners can learn from and with professional musicians in two practical sessions with violinist (and Alexander Technique teacher), Ron Colyer, and clarinettist, Andrew Roberts.

Click here to download the programme

Please note this event is now fully booked.

Attendees should come to the main reception of:

Franklin-Wilkins Building
Stamford Street
London
SE1 9NH

Venue information: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/about/campuses/waterloo.html