Archive for the ‘Professional Development’ Category

Musicians’ Health and Wellbeing – an Interdisciplinary Approach

Tuesday, May 3rd, 2016

A one day research seminar funded by the British Psychological Society (Division of Health Psychology)

12th May 2016 | 9.30 am – 5 pm
Royal College of Music, London

The physical and psychological demands of the training and practice that musicians must achieve to perform to a high standard on their instruments can produce deleterious effects on health and wellbeing, arising mostly from musculoskeletal and anxiety-related causes. In an attempt to bridge the gap between musicians’ health, health psychology and sports psychology, this event brings together experts who will approach topics such as musculoskeletal issues, performance anxiety, stress management, health promotion, implementation research and behaviour change.

The event is free but advance booking is essential.

Find out more.

BIMM/SOMM Joint Winter Symposium

Thursday, October 1st, 2015

The British Institute of Musculoskeletal Medicine (BIMM) and the Society of Musculoskeletal Medicine (SOMM) is proud to announce a Combined Symposium: Challenging Joints: Management of laxity, instability and hypermobility, taking place in Birmingham on Saturday, the 14th of November 2015. A number of experts and highly reputed speakers will cover the medical, surgical, and therapeutic aspect of the condition. There will be a variety of interactive workshops providing an insight into the practical considerations of the condition. The day will also offer a great opportunity to network and exchange ideas and knowledge with other members of the professions.

For further information please take a look at the event page over at the BIMM website: Challenging Joints: Management of Laxity Instability and Hypermobility

Saturday 14th November 2015
Jury’s Inn, Birmingham City Centre

A great resource for anyone interested in musculoskeletal disorders, BIMM’s education programme of  short courses and workshops on various aspects of musculoskeletal medicine is ongoing. Forthcoming events include:

Soft Tissue Examination & Injection Roadshow: 4th November 2015

Chronic Pain Management: 21st – 23rd November 2015

Event Report: BVA Rock & Pop Day, September 2015

Wednesday, September 30th, 2015

BAPAM Clinician, Dr Shareen Chua, reports from the British Voice Association (BVA) Interactive Rock & Pop Day, London, 13th September 2015. 

A quiet Sunday morning on Chiswick High Street – one man on his morning run, a dog with a tennis ball in its mouth and a woman driving an empty double decker bus. Through the entrance of a pub, empty tables, a smiling bartender, but beyond its courtyard, a large chattering crowd was audible. Vocal coaches, singers, songwriters, voice specialist Speech and Language Therapists, instrumentalists, voice rehabilitation specialists, voice researchers, performance coaches and consultant laryngologists, amongst all present at this event organised by the BVA. Also in attendance from BAPAM were Dr Frances Carter, Dr Miranda Godfrey & I.

At the start of the programme, Canadian singer songwriter, Selena Evangeline  took to stage to demonstrate the range and variety of vocal effects available to a solo live performer, in her case using vocal audio equipment by TC-Helicon.

Kim Chandler (vocal coach & lecturer) got our vocal cords going by getting us to attempt various vocal onsets, characterising them and offering suggestions on alternative ways of achieving particular sounds and reducing glottal stops.

Hearing loss associated with onstage noise was thereafter explored by John Rubin (Consultant ENT Surgeon, Royal National Throat, Nose and Ear Hospital). He spoke about various sound levels encountered within the music industry, covering a variety of sound monitors and hearing protection.

Two singers were subsequently brought on stage. In a live setting, Dane Chalfin, current President of the BVA, used song interpretation and emotion to offer them solutions that improved their technique and performance.

Tom Harris (Consultant Otolaryngologist) & Sara Harris (Speech and Language Therapist), no strangers to the realms of vocal health, engaged the audience in their talk about vocal nodules, with Sara Harris sharing several strategies and exercises that might be helpful in such an instance.

Applying the Primal Sound Model to an instantly familiar Pharrell Williams number, Craig Lees got everyone on our feet creating various vocal sounds, forming a Pop Choral group thus concluding the day’s programme – on a high note!

Although the BVA holds their Interactive Rock & Pop Day every two years, their Voice Clinics Forum will take place on Friday, 23 October 2015 at St Thomas’ Hospital, London SE1. The October event will cover topics such as the role of Voice Clinics in the NHS, training in laryngology for ENT surgeons, training for singing teachers involved with Voice Clinics and a discussion of ongoing research & audit papers on the aspect of voice or voice care in the UK.

BAPAM and the BVA are actively exploring opportunities to collaborate on future projects. Suggestions are welcome!

August 2015 Newsletter

Thursday, August 6th, 2015

Our August 2015 Newsletter focuses on our education and training work.

Did you know our Trainer Network delivers workshops in health, injury prevention and performance enhancement throughout the performing arts community?

Are you a healthcare practitioner or doctor interested in training and professional development with a focus on helping performing arts professionals overcome health problems affecting their ability to work and perform?

Find out more in our current Newsletter:

British Association for Performing Arts Medicine Newsletter August 2015

To receive our Newsletters by email please sign up to our mailing list by entering your email address here and clicking send:

BVA Study Day – Management of the Young Voice

Wednesday, May 20th, 2015

Sunday, 5th July 2015
Baden Powell House, 65-67 Queen’s Gate, London SW7 5JS

AGM: 9.30am – 10.15am
Study Day: 10.30am – 4.45pm

This study day from the British Voice Association will explore the management, training and therapy of the young voice. It will incorporate identifying problems, handling the changing voice and will look at potential routes to therapy where necessary. It will address issues for both female and male adolescent singers as well as children and will extend into the realms of hearing and speech therapy.

Full information and booking:
http://www.britishvoiceassociation.org.uk/events.htm

Speakers Include:

Stuart Barr (chair of the panel) Conductor and Singing Coach
Lesley Cavalli Joint Head of Speech and Language Therapy Services Team Leader for SLT-ENT Related Services, Great Ormond Street Hospital
Nicola Gorb Highly Specialist Speech and Language Therapist ENT/Voice, Great Ormond Street Hospital
Ruth Hansford Author, BBC Noise Guides
Graham Welch Professor and Chair of Music Education at UCL Institute of Education
Jenevora Williams Singing Teacher
Emma Winscom Singer, Composer and Singing Teacher

 

The Good Musculoskeletal Doctor – Have Your Say

Wednesday, April 22nd, 2015

A deliberative conference organised by the British Institute of Musculoskeletal Medicine (BIMM)

View/download the full programme details here: Programme & Details Good MSK Doctor 2015

To register interest in attending the conference, or simply to contribute your observations or remarks, you can use this form, which should be returned to BIMM: Register Interest Good MSK Doctor 2015

Thursday 18th June 2015

The Royal Orthopaedic Hospital
Bristol Road
South Birmingham
B31 2AP.

Medical involvement in musculoskeletal services at the interface: do you provide patient care at grades from GPSI to clinical independence; manage or commission such services; lead clinical teams; are you training doctors for this role, or in such training?

If so, this conference is aimed at you.

Musculoskeletal services need medical input but it is by no means clear or agreed what that input should be. Currently, service design varies around the UK, so
experience with different models is available to inform progress. Obstacles to development come in many forms but lack of communication, consultation and consensus are major adverse factors that this conference will address.

The programme will draw contributions from all relevant medical specialists involved in provision of musculoskeletal services. Presentations will address the
roles, competences and training of the musculoskeletal doctors of the future, with contributions also from those affected by medical care in this area: physiotherapists, patients, purchasers, educators.

It is intended that an active audience will bring their experiences and expectations of the field to test ideas emerging from the panel debates. Outcomes from this process will be available to inform the work of the Musculoskeletal Clinical Networks on Workforce and Training established by ARMA under the auspices of NHSE.

When expressing interest in the conference, you will be asked what your particular field of interest and experience is: You may be invited, or you can offer, to give a specific input so that the platform presentations can cover the field geographically and by approach. All attending are encouraged to contribute from the floor at each stage.

Event Report: ASPAH 2014 Symposium

Friday, March 6th, 2015

Tommi Sliiden, osteopath and a graduate of UCL’s MSc in Performing Arts Medicine, attended the November 2014 Symposium of the Australian Society for Performing Arts Healthcare, to present research into breathing in musical theatre performers. We were pleased to help facilitate this through a BAPAM Research and Education Bursary.

Tommi’s report follows: 

ASPAH 2014 Symposium

Tommi Sliiden M.Sc PAM, B.Ost

The theme of this years ASPAH symposium was The complete performer: Turning evidence into practice, with the focus on research and knowledge that could immediately be integrated and translated into clinical, studio or organisational practice. Participants and speakers included performers, teachers, practitioners and researchers from Australia, Malaysia, Canada, and UK.

Opening

Dr Cliffton Chan and Dr Paul Duff welcomed all participants and officially thanked the indigenous Australians for allowing the borrowing of their land, upon which the University had been built. They were further delighted with the range of this years speakers and the increasing development of research into and practice of Performing Arts Medicine specifically – rather than just “adapted sports medicine”.

Keynote speech

The Central Nervous System as a limiting factor to performance and recovery from injury, by Victor Popov, one of Australia’s leading Sports Physiotherapists with a long experience of and interest in Performing Arts medicine. He pointed out the importance of considering the complex and non-linear role of the CNS in order to achieve successful training or treatments, rather than just focusing on mechanical repair and symptomatic relief.

The performance is an expression of skill that is in turn a highly refined motor pattern.  If proprioception is dysfunctional, the execution will be dysfunctional. Poorly co-ordinated contraction and muscle tone pattern easily leads to overuse injury. It is therefore important to appropriately engage CNS in training and treatment – sometimes musculoskeletal injury is related to CNS ‘overload’. By modulating the input to CNS, the output will be changed.

Presentation, 20 min

The Vocal athlete: An introduction to the Estill Method, by Gerald Marko, an Austrian born, Melbourne based singer, musician, lecturer, researcher and Certified Master Teacher of the Estill Method and Course Instructor with testing privileges (the highest of their teaching qualifications). His interest in Estill voice training grew early in his singing career, while performing in musicals in Europe, often expected to sing in a vast range of styles, and through his frustration of his own limited level of knowledge but more so, the lack of helpful coaching and teaching. Coaching rarely included clear, objective instructions with reference to various anatomical structures and muscular activity but often focused on achieving subjective feelings and sensations through, many times vague or nonsensical instructions and imagery that was difficult to interpret, such as the advice he once had been given: “Think yellow!”.

The Estill Method uses research based knowledge of anatomy and vocal physiology and focuses on the ability to safely produce various types of sounds and voice qualities by learning to control the specific structures in the vocal mechanism. It includes a series of exercises specifically designed to individually move any of the thirteen identified involved structures, is used to enable reproduction of any of the six arbitrary voice qualities (speech, falsetto, sob, twang, belting, opera) and variations of them.

Care is taken to develop kinaesthetic feedback and to recognise, locate and control the level of effort to enable safe work.

Though the so called “power, source, filter model” for voice production is used (airflow creating power; vibrating vocal folds as the source of sound waves; vocal tract (area from vocal folds to lips) as filter for further shaping and colouring of the tiny sound produced by vocal folds), more focus is put on the control of vocal folds and vocal tract and their interaction, with less focus on breathing.

The Estill Method puts more emphasis on the craft of control of vocal mechanism, rather than “artistry and performance magic”, and makes no subjective judgments such what voice is “pretty” etc. The method is used to help to reproduce any required sound safely and thus useful for any style of music, and can be useful for both singing and voice therapy.

This short presentation acted as an introduction to the afternoon workshop.

Free papers, 10 min each

(I chose to attend the first four)

The relationship between dancer perceptions of dance floor properties, dance floor force reduction and in situ vertical deformation, by Dr Luke Hopper at the Western Australian Academy of Performing Arts, a Sports scientist specialising in clinical biomechanics including 3D motion capture. This study included comparisons of 15 dancers’ perception of how “sprung” four different floor samples were, compared to the vertical deformation carefully measured by specialised cameras. Their study showed that the dancers, as a group, demonstrated the ability to differentiate small variations in floor mechanical properties (0.5-1.5 mm), something that could be used as an assessment method of dance floors, rather than expensive testing equipment. However; an individual dancer’s perception would on its own not provide a statistically relevant accurate representation.

Comments from the dancers also included that some floors could be perceived as “too soft” and working on a harder floor could be seen, by them, as “safer”, as they would know what to expect, and could better rely on their own skilled dance technique to adapt.

Feeling the sound: Finger proprioception in violin pedagogy, by Dr Marina Robinson, a violinist and lecturer in violin at the Sydney Conservatorium of Music, with added personal experience within this field from having to rehabilitate and retrain following an earlier, serious injury. Her ongoing studies in this field investigate how proprioceptive training and cross-disciplinary learning can enhance violin pedagogy. Testing 24 elite violinists’ proprioceptive acuity showed that there were no overall differences between either hand for their chosen specific tests, indicating that, in spite of the difference in tasks, there are significant proprioceptive demands for both left and right hands. She also talked about how proprioception responds to specific training, is correlated with performance acuity and improves with increased age and experience.

Behind ten equally strong fingers, by Dr Therese Milanovic, a Brisbane based pianist and educator with 11 years experience of learning and teaching the Taubman Approach. She gave insight into causes behind the experience of weak fingers, and the importance of considering the synchronisation between fingers, hand, arm, and even the posture of the rest of the body. She talked about how she uses demonstrations, video examples and step-by-step checklists, to address problems rather than, as often happens in teaching, merely pointing out what not to do, or using independent exercises and monotonous drills in repetitive patterns.

The benefits of ergonomically scaled piano keyboard for smaller handed pianists: Leveling the playing field, by Erica Booker, a Sydney pianist and Suzuki piano teacher trainer, presented her ongoing research in muscular effort and functional load (and the risk of performance injuries). So far, ten pianists, aged up to 14 years, have had their forearm flexor and extensor muscles tested using electromyography whilst playing on a ergonomically scaled piano keyboard (5.5 inch octave) and again on regular full sized model (6.5 inch octave).

The current piano keyboard was standardised in the 1880s, based on what suited male virtuosos at the time, such as Liszt, and research has shown that a small hand span is a risk factor for injuries and that it is affecting females, with often smaller hands than men, disproportionately.

A case of facial peripheral neuropathy in a flautist, by David Peterson, physiotherapist for, among others, Sydney Symphony Orchestra. David discussed a recent case study of a single flautist and the specific patient-centered management approach and outcome.

Health promotion in a sample of elite tertiary student-musicians, by Michael Ingle, a Sydney physiotherapist and trombonist. A study that evaluated the effectiveness of a web-based health promotion course (Sound Performers), in a group of elite musicians at the Australian National Academy of Music.

Findings from the Student Musician Health Survey at Universiti Pendidikan Sultan Idris, Malaysia, by Dr Dr Karen Lonsdale, a music graduate with a doctorate involving research in injury prevention and management of flautists. The results of their online, self-reporting survey that attracted 98 full-time undergraduates and post graduates, were consistent with previous studies on musicians health; 29% were currently suffering from playing-related pain, 47% had experienced it at some time, and 57% felt they had not received enough information or advice on playing-related health during their current studies.

Playing-related pain in bowed string students: Preliminary results, by Judith Robitaille, a violinist and Occupational therapist in Québec. Judith presented results from their prospective cohort study of 152 young string students at three different summer camps.  Using questionnaires distributed few week before the camp and again one week into the camp, they inquired about playing habits, playing-related pain and its impact, and found that playing time had increased from 16 hours/week before the camp, to 33 hours/week during the camp, and found the prevalence of playing related musculoskeletal pain being as high as 96%.

Paper Streams, 25 min

Actors health and wellbeing in Australia: Further analysis of 2013 Actors Survey, by Prof Ian Maxwell, Dr Marianna Szab and Dr Mark Seton, all from University of Sydney. Presentation of results from the Equity (Australia) on-line survey 2013, with 782 respondents, that had gathered information of actors’ professional experiences including training, and income from both acting and non-acting sources as well as aspects of health and wellbeing using validated instruments measuring depression, anxiety, eating disorders, alcohol and drug use.

Elite Australian singer – Career stories, by Kathleen Connell, Sydney-based vocal coach, researcher and singer.  Using questionnaires and interviews of a cross section of singers with active careers between 1985-2005 and using established career theoretical concepts from other fields of work, she had investigated singers’ career maintenance and planning, especially in the latter stages of a career with their transition into other areas and potential changes to identity. Further study looked at how entrepreneurial methods, and the identification of a variety of capabilities, can help plan and sustain a career as well as a transition into other fields or professions.

An evaluation of the breathing strategies and maximum phonation time in musical theatre performer during controlled performance tasks, by Tommi Sliiden. The first research of it’s kind, testing 20 professional West End musical performers’ ability to sing long, sustained notes and how that ability is affected by the increased heart rate and effort of dancing; measuring changes to breathing pattern and heart rates whilst repeating (at a performance-like intensity) a chosen 3 minute extract from a musical number taken from their respective show in three different ways: singing only (standing still); dancing only (in silence); and combined, simultaneous singing and dancing (as in show).

Results showed that maximum phonation time was on average reduced to a third, and heart rate nearly doubled, immediately after fully singing and dancing the number. Lung volume per breath remained the same during dancing only, as during singing only (only breathing rate was increased – to the double). Singing restricted the spontaneous breathing used during dancing only, resulting in a reduction of air usage per minute (by 16%) when combining the two.

A questionnaire showed that only 45% of our performers had felt able to combine these two tasks, to their full potential, by opening night.

Workshops, 1h 40 min each

(I chose to attend the last one)

Posture, balance, symmetry and flow, with Victor Popov. With reference to his earlier speech, he elaborated on practical techniques for improvement of the Central Nervous System parameters of posture, balance symmetry and flow, functional posture training, awareness exercises, pain management and how ‘flow’ can be taught to enhance both expression and rehabilitation.

Optimising music performance: a systematic approach to dynamic postural analysis, with Dr Bronwen Ackermann, physiotherapist, researcher and educator. By using a template previously tested and clinically applied successfully to the Australian Youth Orchestra, a framework was provided to evaluate the posture of musicians with their instruments, in a more static position as well as during performance.

Introduction to muscular voice training – Pushing breath is what’s hurting you, with Gerald Marko. Following the presentation earlier in the day, Gerald demonstrated with great enthusiasm and knowledge the different voice qualities used within the Estill Method (speech, falsetto, sob, twang, belting, opera). He used his own impressive vocal skills to illustrate the various sounds and how they can be varied with subtle, controlled changes to various structures and muscles involved in voice production. Video laryngoscopic images of the larynx and vocal folds highlighted some differences seen when producing different voice qualities. We had a demonstration of Voiceprint™ software, a real-time spectral analysis program that records, analyses, and plays back the voice, giving audiovisual feedback about pitch and voice quality, used to enhance the learning and rehabilitation process.

He further explained the basic mechanics of breathing, the involvement of both active and more passive structures – including muscular control and elastic rib recoil, and how the different voice qualities naturally utilise different amounts of air and produce different levels of loudness, pointing out that production of loud volume is not necessarily a result of increased air volume or pressure, and furthermore, how excessive use of abdominal and other respiratory muscles to increase pressure can even be damaging to the larynx, depending on what voice quality and larynx position is used.

Breathing, especially when no sound production is used, often comes naturally, involving various automatic processes, and the Estill method focuses more on the ability to control the larynx and vocal tract, rather than breath control, something that is often emphasised rather more within other types of vocal training. Gerald used the analogue of sailing to explain – breath does indeed provides the power of voice production, like the wind does for sailing, but it is the ability to control the boat and sails to successfully and safely adapt to the wind that is important, not trying to change the wind – “Thus, it’s called sailing – not winding ”.

Closing

Dr Cliffton Chan and Dr Paul Duff thanked all participants and speakers for a successful and interesting day, and presented ASPAHs Career Development Award as well as the award for the winning contribution to this years online competition to create a YouTube clip promoting this year’s symposium!

Post-Symposium

The Symposium was highly inspiring, with a lot of varied speakers within different fields and interesting participants from different backgrounds to discuss the topics and other work related matters; comparing similarities and differences.

During the week that followed the symposium, I had the opportunity to get in contact with some of the other participants and speakers, including Dr Cliffton Chan, 2014 Symposium Chair, and his colleague, the Principal Physiotherapist at Potts Point Physiotherapy, David Peterson, who invited me to the Sydney Opera House to learn more about treating members of the Australian Opera and Ballet Orchestra.

As a final treat, I managed to get a ticket for the Sydney Symphony Orchestra’s concert, “Symphonic Firsts”, performing Brahms’ Piano Concerto No.1 and Mahler’s Symphony No.1 in the magnificent main hall of the Opera House, with the final piece performed by over 120 musicians in the orchestra! A spectacular evening finished off outside on the terrace overlooking the Harbour Bridge, enjoying a glass of Australian wine in the balmy summer evening.

BAPAM Training Day, Sunday May 17, Cambridge

Thursday, March 5th, 2015

Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge
9.30 – 4.30 

Turning an expert eye on the health impact of touring, ENT/reflux and specific issues around piano playing, our programme includes:

Travel health for performers – presentation by Dr Charlie Easmon.

Pianists’ performance issues – presentations by:  Dr Hara Trouli, BAPAM Musculoskeletal physician; Sarah Upjohn, BAPAM and Purcell School physiotherapist. Demonstrations by pianists and keyboard students.

Gastric reflux and the voice – ENT Consultant, Mrs Jan Panesar, and speech therapist speakers to be confirmed.

Lunch is included in the ticket price.

Cancellations prior to 3 May will be fully refunded.

Booking is now open here: http://bapamtraining2015a.eventbrite.co.uk

If you’re not already a Friend of BAPAM, please consider becoming one. Friends have the opportunity to book Early Bird tickets to BAPAM events, with considerable savings on the usual price (Early Bird bookings are now closed for this event). Please note, if you’re already in ‘Price Band A’, you won’t save more by becoming a Friend, but your support will help us deliver our services and keep the performing arts in good health.

This event is part of our regular series of training days for health professionals, researchers, practitioners and others engaged in performing arts healthcare, welfare and education.

We are grateful to Anglia Ruskin University Music Department for providing a free venue for this event and for supporting us as members of the BAPAM Student Advocate Scheme.

Collaborative Working : BVA Study Day

Monday, December 1st, 2014

Collaborative Working - flyer

 

Sunday, 25th January, 2015. Baden Powell House, Queen’s Gate, London. SW7 5JS

This study day, organised by the British Voice Association, looks at the value of collaborative working between professions. It is suitable for all those working in the field of voice.

Working Psychologically with Voice (10am – 1pm)
Peter Butcher B.A.(Hons), M.Psychol: Clinical Psychologist – Specialist in CBT
Annie Elias, MRCSLT: Speech and Language Therapist – Specialist in Voice

This session explores the value of collaborative working between clinical psychology and speech and language therapy in helping to understand and free the voice from underlying psychological stresses. The session will include:

  • Cognitive Behaviour Therapy – a brief summary
  • Psychogenic Voice Disorder – what it means
  • The value of CBT in Voice Therapy
  • A model for joint working
  • Practical tips, case study and role play illustration of using CBT to help treat voice disorders, including with singers.

Whose Body Is It Anyway?

Sally Burgess, ARCM, FRCM, Mezzo, Teacher, Mentor, Director.
Fiona Bryan GGSM.Dip RAM.MSTAT, Musician, Alexander Teacher, Arranger, Artist

Sally Burgess (Singing Teacher) and Fiona Bryan (Alexander Teacher) began working together by chance 4 years ago. Although from very different backgrounds they discovered a common interest underpinning their teaching techniques – the importance and potential of mind-body awareness.

They decided to explore this more deeply via a series of workshops for singers combining their respective areas of expertise and were subsequently asked by “Live Music Now” to work with groups of wind and string players.

They are delighted to have this opportunity to share their experiences with you. They will describe in detail their collaborative teaching methods and put them into action with the aid of some (brave) singing volunteers.

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Recovering Voices: The Transition from ‘injured’ to ‘well’

Wednesday, May 28th, 2014

British Voice Association AGM Study Day July 6th 2014

This study day will address what is meant by vocal injury, and how this affects professional voice users physically, professionally and emotionally. Leading representatives from the fields of Laryngology, Speech and Language Therapy, Singing Teaching/Voice Coaching and Performance Psychology will talk about their different roles in the rehabilitation process, how they determine and measure ‘injury’ and ‘recovery’ and how they communicate and work with clients to achieve a successful outcome.

Recovering Voices is suitable for Speech Therapists, Spoken Voice Teachers, Singing Teachers, Laryngologists and any others who work with developing or rehabilitating voices. It is also suitable for those who wish to have a deeper understanding of issues relating to voice recovery.

Speakers include:
Tori Burnay, (Voice Specialist Speech and Language Therapist, London)
Declan Costello, (Consultant Otolaryngologist, Birmingham)
Phoebe Eley, (Student and Performer, Birmingham)
Gillyanne Kayes, (Singing Teacher, Author and Researcher, Presteigne and London)
Karen O’Connor, (Performance Coach, Birmingham)

This day will also include the British Voice Association Annual General Meeting and the presentation of research papers from the selected finalists competing for the Van Lawrence Prize. The Prize will be awarded at the end of the day.

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Application forms can be completed & sent back to us at administrator@britishvoiceassociation.org.uk

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Please note: this event is not organised by BAPAM and we receive no income from it.