Archive for the ‘Professional Development’ Category

Understanding Hypermobility – a CPD day from Healthy Performers

Monday, October 14th, 2013

Osteopath and Performing Arts Medicine MSc lecturer, Jennie Morton, has organised this one-day CPD course for health practitioners & those involved in the care of performing artists.

Sunday November 3rd 2013
10.00am – 5.00pm
The Club Room
PARK CRESCENT CONFERENCE CENTRE,
229, Great Portland Street. London, W1W 5PN

Jennie and guest speaker, Professor Howard Bird (Rheumatologist, BAPAM clinician in Leeds) will cover topics including:

The spectrum of hypermobility syndromes – aetiology & medical management
Screening & practical measurement/ assessment tools
Hypermobility in performing arts & sports – advantages & disadvantages
Practical demonstrations & case studies of hypermobile subjects
Practical manual treatment techniques for the hypermobile patient

7 Hours CPD
Course Fee £120 (Students £95)

For further info or to request a booking form, please email info@healthyperformers.com

Note: this event is not organised by BAPAM

One Day Conference on Creative Arts and Mental Health

Monday, September 2nd, 2013

BAPAM psychologist, Dr Carol Chapman, and CEO, Deborah Charnock will be attending this forthcoming conference on the intersections between Creative Arts and Mental Health, organised by Mental Healthcare studies in the Wolfson Institute of Preventive Medicine, part of Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry:

http://www.mental-health-studies.org.uk/index.php/events

Work in these fields currently takes place within single disciplines (such as Art Therapy, Music Therapy and Applied Theatre); the main objective of the conference is to bring these and related disciplines together to explore a variety of issues common to both subjects, including: the relationship between creativity and mental health; the arts as a means of changing perceptions and provoking discussion around mental health issues; art as therapy, recovery and resilience; the arts and the representation of mental health in the public sphere.

Event Report: Maximising Performance: Artistry, Implementation and Empowerment

Tuesday, August 27th, 2013

Physiotherapist and BAPAM registered practitioner, Sarah Upjohn, attended the 2013 PAMA symposium with support from BAPAM through our Research and Education Bursary Fund. Here’s Sarah’s report on the event:

Maximising Performance: Artistry, Implementation and Empowerment

Performing Arts Medicine Annual Symposium

July 20th – 23rd   2013

 Snowmass, near Aspen,

Colorado. USA

I am the physiotherapist at The Purcell School for Young Musicians, and have been on the BAPAM Directory of practitioners since October 2008.

I am also a Doctoral student at the University of Cambridge, where I am a member of their first ever cohort of Education Doctorate students.  The Education Doctorate is a five year part-time course designed for mature professionals who are seeking to address, explore, or more deeply understand a situation at their place of work.  I am now 40% of the way through and am seeking to address the incidence of preventable playing related injuries seen in elite young musicians at The Purcell School, through a health promotion and injury prevention programme, including more  ‘tailored’ physical activity.

Every year the Performing Arts Medicine Association holds an Annual Symposium in Snowmass, near Aspen, in Colorado. This year the conference information showed that a significant emphasis was being placed on topics such as

  • Maximising performance
  • Performance physiology
  • Performance Wellness Programmes
  • Athletes and the Arts

I very much wanted to attend, as it seemed so closely aligned to the topic of my EdD, but was utterly unable to afford the airfare, registration fee and accommodation costs. At the end of April I approached BAPAM and asked if they would be able to offer financial help to enable me to attend this high profile and highly relevant conference.  I am extremely grateful to BAPAM and its decision to fund my airfare from London to Aspen.

The conference was wonderful and exceeded my expectations. I arrived late on the evening of 18th July, and had allowed Friday 19th to recover from the journey.  The conference began at 8.30 on Saturday morning and was programed non-stop, with sessions and workshops for three and a half days.  I soon met two friendly faces in the shape of BAPAM colleagues Jennie Morton and Mike Shipley.

Highlights:

For two years I have been reading widely and deeply on the topic of playing related injuries in instrumental musicians as my review of the relevant literature has informed and shaped my research question. One of the most immediately wonderful aspects of the conference was that so many active researchers in Performing Arts Medicine were there, either presenting, or  contributing as delegates. I was able to listen to, meet, and network with so many people whose work I have been reading, that I had an enormous sense of ‘standing on the shoulders of giants’. Three of my particular heroes, William Dawson, Kris Chesky and Ralph Manchester were there: as authors of the ‘Health Promotion in Schools of Music Project’, the work of these men has been absolutely instrumental in the development of my role as physiotherapist at The Purcell School. It was really fabulous to put faces (and voices) to names.

The topics covered were diverse, from sessions about noise induced hearing loss to a beautiful demonstration of physiological changes that occur to heart rate during performance.   But there was a definite move towards performance wellness, and towards using established science from the field of athletics training and exercise physiology within performing arts medicine. As a physiotherapist these two aspects particularly resonate with my thinking.

On Tuesday 23rd July, the conference finished by 11.30 a.m and I wasn’t leaving for the airport until 2.30pm. So I bought a sandwich and a chair lift ticket and rode to the very top of the Elk Camp chair lift. Hugely appreciating the views, Tuesdays lunch was eaten at an altitude of 11,325 feet  (about 11,286 feet higher than lunch in Cambridge on Wednesday).

I came away brimming with ideas that I hope to implement at Purcell, such as

  • Increasing cardio-respiratory fitness levels as a means of reducing levels of performance anxiety.
  • Introducing imagery and visualisation techniques to help reduce performance anxiety and also to introduce ‘off instrument’ practise techniques.
  • Increasing aerobic  fitness capacity to reduce incidence of injury

Most importantly meeting like-minded, committed, caring professionals was inspiring, energising and affirming.  I am looking forward to the start of the 3rd year of the EdD and am ready to continue finding creative ways to address the issue of preventable injuries occurring in young musicians.

Huge thanks to BAPAM for enabling me to attend this world class event. I hope to have work of my own to present there within in the next 2 or 3 years.

Seeking Health Professionals to Work with Performing Artists

Monday, May 20th, 2013

Making Music, the UK’s number one organisation for voluntary music, have just published an article about our search for health professionals to  provide medical advice on performance related injuries or illness to performing artists.

 

Read the full article here

 

A brief summary of what BAPAM offers health professionals:

Specialist clinical experience and professional development

Performing Arts Medicine training and education

Fostering networks of like-minded and committed peers

Supporting research into this fascinating specialism through our Research and Education Bursary Fund and our wealth of experience working in the field since 1984

Membership of the BAPAM Directory of Performing Arts Medicine Practitioners and Specialists

AMABO Scheme – the Association of Medical Advisers to British Orchestras

If you’d like to find out more about working with BAPAM please contact Interim Chief Executive, Deborah Charnock, on 020 7404 5888 or via email.

Occupational Voice Symposium 2013

Tuesday, April 2nd, 2013

The Voice at Work – Optimization & Management

The third Occupational Voice Symposium takes place on 23rd & 24th April 2013 at University College London. National and international speakers will present on topics including:

Remote Monitoring and Tracking of Vocal Load
Ambulatory Monitoring of Voice: Past and Future
Long Term Voice Use Based on the VoxLog Database
The app – OperaVOX™

Challenges and Treatment Outcomes of Occupational Voice Disorders
EU Legislation Update and Current Challenges
Laryngeal Manual Therapy
Workshop in the Resonance Tube Method in Voice Therapy

Telehealth and Behavioural Interventions for Vocal Health
The Cleveland Clinic Approach
Self-Managing Occupational Dysphonia
How to Change Behavior
Solution Focused Approach to Voice Therapy

Etiology, Impact and Intervention in Occupational Voice Disorders
Medicolegal Evaluation of Physical Impairment Due to Occupational Dysphonia
Genetic and Environmental Effects in Dysphonia
Semi-Occlusion Exercises

Please note, this event is not organised by BAPAM

Further information and registration please visit the OVS website here: http://bit.ly/103bYZk 

The Perils of Percussion Playing | Alcohol and the Performing Arts

Friday, March 22nd, 2013

A British Association for Performing Arts Medicine Training Event: 

Saturday 18th May 2013
Main University Building, Cardiff University, Park Place, Cardiff, CF10 3AT 

 

Hand problems in musicians with an emphasis on percussionists
Practical percussion demonstration
Ergonomics
Assessment & treatment advice
Dystonia update
Alcohol and the performing arts

Click here for the full programme.

£80 – Full Day
£50 – Students

To book your place or for more information please return this registration form by post or email the Office and Clinics Manager, Clare Hicks, via clare@bapam.org.uk

BAPAM Training Days provide in-depth explorations of key areas of Performing Arts Medicine and unique insights into aspects of performers’ health and wellbeing. We present performers’ perspectives as well as the expertise of experienced medical practitioners.

Our events are also a great opportunity for all those interested in and engaged with Performing Arts Medicine to meet and network.

For those of you who are GPs, BAPAM training days should qualify for CPD credits under the RCGP CPD credits scheme (please check this with them directly).

PAMA First International Performing Arts Medicine Conference Survey

Tuesday, February 19th, 2013

Are YOU interested in ICPAM16, the 1st. International Conference on Performing Arts Medicine 2016?

The International Liaison Committee of PAMA are asking all Performing Arts Medicine practitioners and those involved or interested in the specialism to fill in their survey at www.pam-wiki.org. For the first time in 2016, and maybe followed in 2020 and 2024, there is the possibility of a WORLD conference outside Aspen, Colorado (USA) and this survey is your chance to contribute to its planning.

The International Liaison Committee of PAMA aims to:

Foster communication between Performing Arts Medicine communities internationally

Facilitate the process of health promotion within the performing arts community
Provide information on international PAM resources for performing artists and health professionals

Encourage international collaboration on PAM research and educational initiatives

Musicians Health Day

Tuesday, November 13th, 2012

Honorary Lecturers for the MSc in Performing Arts Medicine, Jennie Morton and Ian MacDonald, have organised this practical day for educators and health professionals involved in the care of musicians, to be held at UCL on 15th December 2012 (please note: this is an independent training event and is not organised by BAPAM).

Musicians Health Day 2012

Saturday 15th December 2012

10:00am – 5.00pm

University College London

Wilkins Haldane Room, Gower Street, London. WC1E 6BT

The day will include:

A comprehensive overview of orchestral instruments

Common injuries in musicians

Practical assessment of the instrumental musician

Instrument ergonomics and adaptations

Healthy practise advice

7 hours CPD

Course Fee: £95 (Students £75)

Course Tutors:

Jennie Morton BSc (Hons) Osteopathy

UCL Honorary Lecturer for the MSc in Performing Arts Medicine

Osteopath & Lecturer for The British Association for Performing Arts Medicine

Ian MacDonald MSc (Vocal Pathology); Dip RCM; ARCM; ALCM

UCL Course Tutor and Honorary Lecturer for MSc in Performing Arts Medicine

Voice Pathologist and Rehabilitation Specialist for The British Association for Performing Arts Medicine

Guest Lecturer Royal Academy of Music and Royal College of Music in Health Promotion & Professional Development

For further info or to request a booking form, please email jennie@jenniemorton.co.uk

Performing Arts Medicine Videos: PAMI Conference

Wednesday, October 24th, 2012

Here is a great archive of all the talks from the recent Performing Arts Medicine Conference in Galway, organised by PAMI. The first such event to be held in Ireland, the day featured BAPAM clinicians, Dr Mike Shipley and Dr Juliet Bressan; Osteopath and Performing Arts Medicine MSc lecturer, Jennie Morton; Vocal health adviser and PAM MSc Director, Ian MacDonald  and many more leading Performing Arts Medicine experts. A fantastic resource for all those interested in this fascinating medical specialism.

Hitting the Right Medical Notes – An article about the PAMI Conference by June Shannon for the Irish Times.

You can see all of the videos here

PAMA Symposium 2012 Report – International Research and the Future of Performing Arts Medicine

Tuesday, August 28th, 2012

Ian MacDonald (Development Director for the BAPAM/UCL Performing Arts Medicine MSc) reports from the 2012 Performing Arts Medicine Association Symposium, Aspen, Colorado, July 26-29 2012:

Arriving in Aspen for the first time the eye is struck by the immense scale of the mountains and the lush greens of the tree canopies upon them. The small but beautiful town nestles amongst this splendour providing the perfect example of wilderness chic. Further up the winding highway is the tiny ski village of Snowmass, built in the 1960s as a way of accessing the incredible skiing potential of Burnt Mountain, Elk Ridge, Brush Creek and other such evocative excursions. The grandeur of the The Viceroy Hotel, the home of the PAMA conference for the past few years, sits in a prominent position at the heart of this well planned town.

This year PAMA reached the grand old age of 30 and its focus was on ‘International Research’ and ‘The Future of Performing Arts Medicine’, two subjects at the core of recent  BAPAM initiatives. Therefore, our new Diploma/MSc and our inter-collegiate research planning meant we had something good and relevant to share. As it turned out I was the last person of the conference to speak…….it goes without saying that all that had come before was a hard act to follow, but the presentation was favourably received and an invitation made to return next year to continue the conversation about R&D of Performing Arts Medicine.

There were representations from all over the map with Australia, America and Canada representing the majority of speakers. However, our own Dr Juliet Bressan from Dublin and Patrice Berque from Glasgow gave inspiring presentations on dystonia and the developments in both clinical practice and rehabilitation research. The highlight was the appearance of the founder of PAMA, Dr Alice Brandfonbrenner (pictured). She gave an inspiring and thought-provoking talk about the State of the Performing Arts Medicine Nation, receiving a standing ovation. She elicited questions such as, “What have we become?”; “Where are we going?”; “How do we develop scientifically without losing the artistry?”; “What are all these measurements of performers for?”…

Chatter in the coffee breaks was fast and furious and extremely stimulating. There was also some incredible musicianship and hospitality organised by Dr Kathleen Riley and her executive team – including violinist Cho-Liang Lin (pictured) performing astonishing Kreisler upon a multi-million dollar 1715 “Titian” Stradivarius and a remote (live but not in the room we were in) performance by Frederick Chiu of Prokofiev’s fiendish Toccata in D minor opus 11. There were also performances from many of the presenting practitioners, including a masterful rendition of “Poisoning Pigeons in the Park” by your very own Jennie Morton and Ian MacDonald.

The huge passion from all, in attempting to understand the difficult paradigms that face research into such areas as hearing loss (Dr Kris Chesky and Dr Amyn M. Alain University of North Texas) and dystonia was consistent, as was the concern that we don’t lose the artist amongst the statistics and the data (Regina Campbell, Boston). There seemed to be agreement that although there is still much to measure and access, in actual fact many research protocols are well established and providing very useful and helpful information (Prof. Dr. Christoff Zalpour, Osnabruech, Germany). This was coupled with a sense from the younger members of the conference that International Projects (Dr Christine Guptill, Ontario, Canada) needed to be expanded to include them,  because future direction and opportunities within the field were not totally clear. So more to do here. Interesting presentations about psychology and mindfulness (Gail Berenson, Ohio University; Vanessa Cornett-Murtada, Minneapolis) also figured prominently sparking off keen debate.

So to the future……

The future we all hope lies in our cooperation. The Australian team (ASPAH) were very proactive this year and the we were inspired by drive of one of the world’s champions of PAM, Dr Bronwen Ackermann, setting up (in the last few weeks) the International Liaison Committee (the ILC of PAMA) to facilitate this needed global cooperation and shared thinking on a number of the current burning issues.  Hopes for an International PAM Conference once every 4 years and increased presence using social media are also high on this initial agenda.

All eyes are on us here in London as we proceed with year two of the Performing Arts Medicine MSc and all fingers are busy emailing across the time-lines to secure the development and education of the next generation of experts within the field. Watch this space.