Job Vacancy: Part-time Administration Assistant

August 4th, 2017

We are recruiting a part-time Administration Assistant to work in our busy London office and clinic. Initially the contract will be for three months, with the possibility of a permanent position being offered at the end of this time.

The job description can be read and downloaded here.

To apply please email info@bapam.org.uk with your CV and a covering letter addressed to Clare Jackson, BAPAM Office and Clinics Manager.

If you prefer to post your application our address is:

BAPAM, 31 Southampton Row, London WC1B 5HJ

The closing date for applications is Friday 18th August and interviews will take place the following Thursday 24th August.

International Conference on Performing Arts Medicine (ICPAM) 2018

July 26th, 2017

BAPAM is pleased to be taking part in the forthcoming ICPAM Conference, which will be held 29 – 31 March 2018 in the Hague. Initiated by the Hague Medical Centre and Dutch Performing Arts Medicine Association, the conference brings an international perspective to both music and dance medicine. Collaborators include ASPAH, BAPAM, CeiMArs, CND,  DGfMM, DHF, IADMS, Médecine des Arts, ÖGfMM, PAMA, NIDMS, SMM, tamed and UNISA.

Intending to share state of the art medical scientific knowledge on the topics of dance, music, voice, hearing and mind, the organisers now welcome abstracts for oral presentations as well as poster presentations.

Abstract deadline extended t0 December 1st, 2017 23:59 CET

You can find out more and submit an abstract for ICPAM 2018 here.

Registration for the conference will open soon.

BAPAM Physiotherapist Supports Team GB at World Games

July 19th, 2017

The 2017 World Games commence in Wroclaw, Poland on July 20th, and we wish the very best of luck to the Team GB athletes and BAPAM physiotherapist, Louise Curley who returns to her role supporting gymnasts, acrobats and tumblers as the British Gymnastics Delegation Physiotherapist.

Here at BAPAM, Louise gives expert help to musicians, actors, dancers, circus and physical performers, providing free physiotherapy assessments and subsidised, affordable follow up sessions at our London clinic. She also runs her own practice Rejuven8 Physiotherapy in Warwickshire.

BAPAM is Recruiting a Full Time Director

July 13th, 2017

The British Association for Performing Arts Medicine (BAPAM) is a unique medical charity providing health advice and support to members of the performing arts community. We provide a national Helpline and confidential clinical consultations for performers experiencing performance-related health problems, as well as education and resources on healthy performance practice and professional training in performing arts medicine.

About the role

Following the planned retirement this year of our current chief executive, BAPAM seeks a leader to take the charity forward over what promises to be an exciting new period of ambitious growth in partnership with our principal funder, Help Musicians UK. The role involves strategic and operational leadership of the organisation, including management of a small team of administrative staff and a clinical workforce comprising of voluntary and healthcare professionals working throughout the UK.

For this role we’re looking for someone who is a strong leader, someone who has the ability to innovate and offer creative solutions, whilst thinking strategically. The successful candidate will be passionate about the performing arts and have the ability to be flexible and adaptable whilst displaying personal integrity and high standards of work.

Click here for further information and to apply.

The closing date for applications is Friday 5th August 2017.

Activity and Feedback Report 2016

July 13th, 2017

BAPAM is committed to transparency in our policies and activities. Our service monitoring and feedback procedures are essential in ensuring we continue to provide a safe, evidence-based, effective, and data-secure health care service and we report this data annually.

Our full service data for 2016 is published here:

BAPAM Activity and Feedback Report 2016

Providing health advice to performers through one-to-one clinical consultations is BAPAM’s core activity.

The data in this report relates to our clinical activity for 2016 i.e. all registrations and free appointments offered in BAPAM clinics nationally.

The information has been compiled from 2 main sources and reported as follows:

BAPAM patient registration database (Microsoft Dynamics CRM): demographic and appointments data – primarily for new patients. These data are collected via telephone.

Anonymous patient feedback (Survey Monkey web surveys): collected from new patients attending their first free assessment with each clinician they see during their contact with BAPAM. Additional anonymous followup information is also collected, and details are summarised in the report.

Additional reports about ‘Musicians – only’ activity, Education and Training activity, AMABO doctors’ activity, etc are available on request.

Hearing Aids for Music Conference

June 8th, 2017

14th September -15 September 2017

School of Music, University of Leeds

Hearing Aids for Music‘s conference will bring together deaf musicians and music lovers, hearing aid users, audiologists, researchers and hearing aid manufacturers from across the globe. They will share their knowledge and experiences discuss current and emerging technologies benefiting music listening and performance, and share recent research findings through a mixture of presentations and workshops.

Alongside academic dissemination, there will also be performances by musicians with hearing impairments to provide further scope for discussion and engagement.

Find out more and register here.

Injury Prevention at The Purcell School for Young Musicians

June 8th, 2017

The Purcell School’s Specialist Physiotherapist, Sarah Upjohn, has had her pioneering work incorporated in the school’s new Playing-Related Musculoskeletal Injury Prevention Policy. While working at the school (and helping performers here at BAPAM), Sarah’s Doctoral work at the University of Cambridge has focused on preventing playing-related injuries in young musicians. Most of these problems, which musicians starting university and entering the profession frequently already suffer from, are preventable. The Purcell School’s strategy to identify risk factors and improve injury prevention awareness among pupils, staff, parents and all involved with the school, is exemplary in preparing young musicians for healthy and succesful careers.

Find out more and read the policy here.

Free Performing Arts Medicine Learning Day London June 17

May 26th, 2017

Organised by the UCL Performing Arts Medicine MSc team, this free event takes place on Saturday 17 June at the Institute of Sports Medicine and Health in London. If you would like to attend please register by emailing dsis.performingarts@ucl.ac.uk.

1st PAM Day UK
17 June 2017
10am – 4pm

Full programme now published

Health Education in the Arts Survey

May 25th, 2017

Researcher, Lisa Brachfeld, from the MSc Performing Arts Medicine programme at University College London, invites musicians, dancers, actors, and singers who are professionals or students/teachers at accredited conservatoires to participate in a new study of health education in the performing arts. The aim is to prove that performers could benefit from more health and injury prevention education. Learning about attitudes towards this subject will help to improve the effectiveness of education curriculums.

Take the survey here

Actor Bob Cryer Walks 100 Miles for BAPAM (and Werner Herzog)

May 18th, 2017

Thanks very much to actor and writer Bob Cryer, who is about to walk 100 miles and donate funds raised to BAPAM.

You can read more about just why Bob is walking 100 miles (at the behest of film director Werner Herzog no less), and help us help performers beat work-related health problems here: Bob’s Herzog 100 Mile Walk

“I walk for several reasons, but chief among them has become the positive effect it’s had on my mental health. Life as an actor and writer can be incredibly rewarding and I consider myself very lucky to be able to spend my days pursuing a career in the arts, but it’s vagaries can often render you confused, stressed and isolated. Walking can help clear the mind and gain some perspective. On the whole, I feel like I’ve been spared some of the darker spirals that can take hold during a bout of black dog, but many others are not so fortunate.

A career in the arts, which is so reliant on self evaluation, self expression and self examination, can place a more targeted kind of burden on a person’s mental health. And when you consider that one in four people in the UK will experience mental health issues at some point their life, then consider what the effects are on those in the performing arts.

Yes, the highs are incredible but the lows are indelible”