Posts Tagged ‘CBT’

Event Report: British Tinnitus Association Conference September 2014

Tuesday, December 23rd, 2014

Dr Anita Nathan, NHS GP and BAPAM Clinician reports from the BTA conference 2014 

The British Tinnitus Association (BTA) is the leading source of information about tinnitus in the UK. All patients contacting BAPAM with concerns about the condition are advised to contact the BTA and investigate their many excellent publications. BAPAM’s recently updated Factsheet on hearing, Don’t Lose the Music, also highlights the BTA as a vital resource.

I attended their fascinating conference, held in September 2014 at the British Library Conference Centre in London. This short report summarises a few key points of particular interest to BAPAM clinicians and performing arts medicine specialists.

In an overview of the highlights of recent research into tinnitus, we heard about a trial of MDMA assisted psychotherapy for tinnitus, investigations into neural plasticity and multisensory processing, ‘residual inhibition’ (a brief suppression of tinnitus sounds after an offset (i.e. a presentation) of an external sound), and the way that sound therapy depends on the degree of hearing loss associated with tinnitus.

Investigations have been made into the effects of amplification with hearing aids in tinnitus patients with a co-existing mild to moderate hearing loss. One trial found that a hearing aid had an equal effect to a sound generator. Hearing aids can act as both noise generators and amplifiers for tinnitus treatment. Some early trial results suggest positive results from low level input from hearing aids for tinnitus sufferers without any hearing loss.

Some research suggests that stress may be a more significant factor in tinnitus than other causes (such as hearing loss and noise exposure). Cortisol, which is a marker for stress, affects hearing. Trials are ongoing into mindfulness based stress reduction approaches to managing tinnitus.

People with severe tinnitus have chronically higher basal cortisol levels than those with less severe symptoms and people without tinnitus.

A number of systematic reviews have shown the efficacy of CBT (Cognitive Behavioural Therapy).

Both avoidant coping and active coping mechanisms can seem to worsen tinnitus so it is necessary to find a balance. Increasing age is associated with increasing tinnitus annoyance.

GPs and assessing clinicians need to be aware that the first contact with someone suffering from tinnitus is very important. Catastrophic thinking worsens tinnitus so think carefully about giving the advice ‘learn to live with it’. Audiology-led tinnitus services seem to be the way forward, with an ENT opinion sought afterwards if necessary. There are shorter waiting times, less anxiety for the patient, and all initial investigations can be done by the audiology team.

All tinnitus patients should be given a hearing test to find out if they have hearing loss.

The BTA’s own Conference Reports from 2010 – 2013 can be found on their website here: http://tinnitus.org.uk/conference-reports.

Collaborative Working : BVA Study Day

Monday, December 1st, 2014

Collaborative Working - flyer

 

Sunday, 25th January, 2015. Baden Powell House, Queen’s Gate, London. SW7 5JS

This study day, organised by the British Voice Association, looks at the value of collaborative working between professions. It is suitable for all those working in the field of voice.

Working Psychologically with Voice (10am – 1pm)
Peter Butcher B.A.(Hons), M.Psychol: Clinical Psychologist – Specialist in CBT
Annie Elias, MRCSLT: Speech and Language Therapist – Specialist in Voice

This session explores the value of collaborative working between clinical psychology and speech and language therapy in helping to understand and free the voice from underlying psychological stresses. The session will include:

  • Cognitive Behaviour Therapy – a brief summary
  • Psychogenic Voice Disorder – what it means
  • The value of CBT in Voice Therapy
  • A model for joint working
  • Practical tips, case study and role play illustration of using CBT to help treat voice disorders, including with singers.

Whose Body Is It Anyway?

Sally Burgess, ARCM, FRCM, Mezzo, Teacher, Mentor, Director.
Fiona Bryan GGSM.Dip RAM.MSTAT, Musician, Alexander Teacher, Arranger, Artist

Sally Burgess (Singing Teacher) and Fiona Bryan (Alexander Teacher) began working together by chance 4 years ago. Although from very different backgrounds they discovered a common interest underpinning their teaching techniques – the importance and potential of mind-body awareness.

They decided to explore this more deeply via a series of workshops for singers combining their respective areas of expertise and were subsequently asked by “Live Music Now” to work with groups of wind and string players.

They are delighted to have this opportunity to share their experiences with you. They will describe in detail their collaborative teaching methods and put them into action with the aid of some (brave) singing volunteers.

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Research: How Musicians Experience Forms of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT)

Tuesday, October 22nd, 2013

Call for Participants: 

 

Ellis Pecen is a Masters student in Performance Science at the Royal College of Music, interested in exploring how musicians experience forms of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT). To do this, a short anonymous online survey has been developed that should take about 15-20 minutes to complete. In this survey you will be asked anonymous questions about your musical background and your experiences with CBT. The research has received ethical approval from the Conservatoires UK Research Ethics Committee.

Who can take part?

The recruitment criteria for taking part are:

1. That you are a musician (or former musician) with experiences with CBT. You can be a student, professional or a musician who plays as part of a hobby, regardless of age or experience.

2. That you are undergoing or have undergone CBT treatment. There are many approaches to CBT and many forms of delivery (e.g. private/group counselling, computerized CBT, CBT via self-help methods etc.). All forms are valid for the purposes of this research, yet in order to ensure a consistent definition of CBT we are interested in interventions that adhere to the following characteristics:

i. CBT is based on the theory that our thoughts determine our feelings and behaviour and that, therefore, changing the way we think allows us to change the way we feel and behave.

ii. CBT is problem-focused and goal-oriented. The emphasis is on the ‘now’ and the future rather than the past.

iii. CBT requires active participation from clients in the form of homework assignments designed to apply the acquired skills from the sessions to real-life situations.

iv. Clients are educated about their symptoms and are made aware of strategies to enable positive change

How do I take part?

If you feel that you meet the above criteria and would like to complete the anonymous survey, please follow this link: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/GHVPSZX

If you have any further questions about the research, feel free to contact Ellis at ellis.pecen@rcm.ac.uk

Thank you for taking the time to read through this information and considering participating in the research. You help is most appreciated!

 

BAPAM Counselling and Psychotherapy Services Survey

Thursday, October 13th, 2011

Dr Carol Chapman is a counselling psychologist and performance coach, and works as a BAPAM practitioner. Dr Chapman has recently taken the lead on our research into psychological and mental health issues affecting performing artists and the development of appropriate services and treatments for this special group.

Dr Chapman is currently conducting a survey of the amount, scope and treatment modalities currently being employed by counselling and psychotherapy practitioners on the BAPAM Directory. We are also interested to hear from practitioners who are not currently associated with BAPAM.

Practitioners are being asked to complete a brief, anonymous questionnaire covering details of professional practice, experience with performing artists, and views and needs regarding specialist support, as well as basic demographic information. The survey will help us identify practitioners’ needs and enable us to develop new and exciting networks, training and resources for specialist work in this field.

If you think the survey is relevant to you but have not yet completed a questionnaire, please download the survey form and return it to us at:

BAPAM, FREEPOST NAT 18607, London WC1X 8BR, or contact Dr Chapman at carol.chapman@bapam.org.uk for more information.

Thanks for your help!

download the survey form here