Posts Tagged ‘Dance Medicine’

International Conference on Performing Arts Medicine (ICPAM) 2018

Wednesday, July 26th, 2017

BAPAM is pleased to be taking part in the forthcoming ICPAM Conference, which will be held 29 – 31 March 2018 in the Hague. Initiated by the Hague Medical Centre and Dutch Performing Arts Medicine Association, the conference brings an international perspective to both music and dance medicine. Collaborators include ASPAH, BAPAM, CeiMArs, CND,  DGfMM, DHF, IADMS, Médecine des Arts, ÖGfMM, PAMA, NIDMS, SMM, tamed and UNISA.

Intending to share state of the art medical scientific knowledge on the topics of dance, music, voice, hearing and mind, the organisers now welcome abstracts for oral presentations as well as poster presentations.

Abstract deadline: November 1st, 2017 23:59 CET

You can find out more and submit an abstract for ICPAM 2018 here.

Registration for the conference will open soon.

Performers Health Hub App Launched

Thursday, March 30th, 2017

Dance Longer Dance Stronger has launched a new app designed to enable performers to locate a range of dance-specialist healthcare, both private and NHS, and reliable, evidence-based resources on a range of health topics including fitness, first-aid for dancers, nutrition and hypermobility.

Resources on the Performers Health Hub are drawn from a consortium of organisations at the forefront of dance medicine and science research and advocacy including National Institute of Dance Medicine and Science, One Dance UK, Safe in Dance International and the British Association for Performing Arts Medicine and will be continually updated as research progresses.

The app has been developed in response to the high injury rate among dancers and the lack of time available due to the nature of their work, to conduct thorough research in locating top quality healthcare.

Around 80% of all dancers will suffer an injury each year through training, rehearsal or performance* or as a result of fatigue and overwork, insufficient warming-up or cooling-down, recurring injury or not being able to respond to the early warning signs of injury**.

Due to the nature of their work, and the demands of their complex schedules, dancers, teachers and choreographers can find it extremely challenging to find the sufficient time needed in order to locate reliable, dance specialist care and resources. This can lead to many dancers abandoning the search altogether and working through an injury.

Director of Dance Longer Dance Stronger Claire Farmer comments: ‘By housing this vital information in one place, the app removes the need to spend precious time searching the internet and attempting to establish the quality and reliability of the information available there. Dancers can quickly find dance specialist healthcare practitioners and clinical services, providing the expert knowledge that can help dancers then return to the studio quicker.’

To download the app please visit the Apple or Google stores.

The information on this app is not intended to diagnose an injury.  If you are concerned about an injury please always consult a registered healthcare professional.  To query any of the information highlighted in this app please contact Dance Longer Dance Stronger directly.

For more information contact: Claire Farmer MSc info@dancelongerdancestronger.com

*Laws, H (2005) Fit to Dance 2, Dance UK, Newgate Press, UK: London

** Brinson, P & Dick, F (1996) Fit to Dance, Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation, UK: London

Research Published into Ballet Dancers’ Experiences of Injury and Osteopathy

Friday, February 24th, 2017

Osteopath, Toby Pollard-Smith, has published his research into Professional ballet dancers’ experience of injury and osteopathic treatment in the UK  in the January 2017 issue of the Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies. BAPAM helped recruit participants for the project, which Toby undertook while training to be an osteopath.

Toby’s previous career as a professional ballet dancer contributed to his interest and expertise in treating dance injuries, and we were recently pleased to welcome him to our Directory of Practitioners. Toby, who is also a keen trumpet player, treats dancers, musicians and other performing artists in Ascot and Marlow. Find Toby Pollard-Smith on the BAPAM Directory.

Project Breakalign

Tuesday, February 10th, 2015

Project Breakalign was founded by Nefeli Tsiouti in 2013 to prevent injuries for breakers/dancers. The research team of dance and medical specialists is committed to creating a methodology of corrective exercises which will reduce the risk of injuries for breakers.

‘This is the first university research of Dance Medicine on bboys/bgirls in the UK, conducted by bboys and bgirls, with the aim to create accessible and accurate knowledge for the hip-hop community. The research will involve bboys and bgirls who are active in the hip-hop scene as the core team, as well as researchers, physiotherapists, coaches, [and] medical specialists’. 

A Kickstarter campaign has been set up to help expand their research programme.

Project Breakalign is working in association with Dance UK, and has ethical approval from University College London.

Toronto Meeting of PAMA

Tuesday, January 22nd, 2013

February 16/17, 2013: Jennie Morton, osteopath and lecturer on the MSc in Performing Arts Medicine at UCL, will give a presentation titled Embodying the Instrument – Healthy Practice for Musicians at the forthcoming Toronto meeting of the Performing Arts Medicine Association, When the Artist’s Body Says No – Stress and the Mind-Body Unity in Health and Disease.

Check this pdf for detailed information: PAMA Toronto 2013 Brochure.

Watch this space for Jennie’s report for BAPAM from the event, which also covers healthy dance practice, hearing protection, artists’ mind and body development, and the lessons we can learn from sports medicine.

Foundations for Excellence Conference 2013

Friday, December 14th, 2012

Foundations for Excellence provide information, guidance and sign-posting in the area of health and wellbeing for young musicians and dancers. In February 2013 they hold their third biennial conference at Dartington Hall in Devon, focused on nurturing and supporting talented young dancers and musicians.

Sessions will be looking at ‘Environments & Models’ to include:

Talent Development
Training the Rebel
Audition Preparation and Performance
International work in Health & Wellbeing
International Alternative Models for Education
Young Person and Emerging Artist Forum
Impact and Importance of the Learning Environment

Speakers include Prof. Dave Collins, Evelyne Allmeindinger, Gary Galbraith, Margo Rijven, Dr. Emma Redding, Rachel Rist, and Dr. Aaron Williamon.

The conference is FREE but spaces are limited and will be allocated on a first come first serve basis, therefore advanced booking is essential. Booking deadline is Friday 8th February 2013.

Click here for all the information and to book a place.

PAMA Symposium 2012 Report – International Research and the Future of Performing Arts Medicine

Tuesday, August 28th, 2012

Ian MacDonald (Development Director for the BAPAM/UCL Performing Arts Medicine MSc) reports from the 2012 Performing Arts Medicine Association Symposium, Aspen, Colorado, July 26-29 2012:

Arriving in Aspen for the first time the eye is struck by the immense scale of the mountains and the lush greens of the tree canopies upon them. The small but beautiful town nestles amongst this splendour providing the perfect example of wilderness chic. Further up the winding highway is the tiny ski village of Snowmass, built in the 1960s as a way of accessing the incredible skiing potential of Burnt Mountain, Elk Ridge, Brush Creek and other such evocative excursions. The grandeur of the The Viceroy Hotel, the home of the PAMA conference for the past few years, sits in a prominent position at the heart of this well planned town.

This year PAMA reached the grand old age of 30 and its focus was on ‘International Research’ and ‘The Future of Performing Arts Medicine’, two subjects at the core of recent  BAPAM initiatives. Therefore, our new Diploma/MSc and our inter-collegiate research planning meant we had something good and relevant to share. As it turned out I was the last person of the conference to speak…….it goes without saying that all that had come before was a hard act to follow, but the presentation was favourably received and an invitation made to return next year to continue the conversation about R&D of Performing Arts Medicine.

There were representations from all over the map with Australia, America and Canada representing the majority of speakers. However, our own Dr Juliet Bressan from Dublin and Patrice Berque from Glasgow gave inspiring presentations on dystonia and the developments in both clinical practice and rehabilitation research. The highlight was the appearance of the founder of PAMA, Dr Alice Brandfonbrenner (pictured). She gave an inspiring and thought-provoking talk about the State of the Performing Arts Medicine Nation, receiving a standing ovation. She elicited questions such as, “What have we become?”; “Where are we going?”; “How do we develop scientifically without losing the artistry?”; “What are all these measurements of performers for?”…

Chatter in the coffee breaks was fast and furious and extremely stimulating. There was also some incredible musicianship and hospitality organised by Dr Kathleen Riley and her executive team – including violinist Cho-Liang Lin (pictured) performing astonishing Kreisler upon a multi-million dollar 1715 “Titian” Stradivarius and a remote (live but not in the room we were in) performance by Frederick Chiu of Prokofiev’s fiendish Toccata in D minor opus 11. There were also performances from many of the presenting practitioners, including a masterful rendition of “Poisoning Pigeons in the Park” by your very own Jennie Morton and Ian MacDonald.

The huge passion from all, in attempting to understand the difficult paradigms that face research into such areas as hearing loss (Dr Kris Chesky and Dr Amyn M. Alain University of North Texas) and dystonia was consistent, as was the concern that we don’t lose the artist amongst the statistics and the data (Regina Campbell, Boston). There seemed to be agreement that although there is still much to measure and access, in actual fact many research protocols are well established and providing very useful and helpful information (Prof. Dr. Christoff Zalpour, Osnabruech, Germany). This was coupled with a sense from the younger members of the conference that International Projects (Dr Christine Guptill, Ontario, Canada) needed to be expanded to include them,  because future direction and opportunities within the field were not totally clear. So more to do here. Interesting presentations about psychology and mindfulness (Gail Berenson, Ohio University; Vanessa Cornett-Murtada, Minneapolis) also figured prominently sparking off keen debate.

So to the future……

The future we all hope lies in our cooperation. The Australian team (ASPAH) were very proactive this year and the we were inspired by drive of one of the world’s champions of PAM, Dr Bronwen Ackermann, setting up (in the last few weeks) the International Liaison Committee (the ILC of PAMA) to facilitate this needed global cooperation and shared thinking on a number of the current burning issues.  Hopes for an International PAM Conference once every 4 years and increased presence using social media are also high on this initial agenda.

All eyes are on us here in London as we proceed with year two of the Performing Arts Medicine MSc and all fingers are busy emailing across the time-lines to secure the development and education of the next generation of experts within the field. Watch this space.

Australian Society for Performing Arts Healthcare Conference 2012

Wednesday, July 25th, 2012

The Australian Society for Performing Arts Healthcare (ASPAH) is a multidisciplinary organisation of  healthcare providers and performing artists dedicated to improving the health of performing artists in Australia.

The annual conference aims to bring together artists, healthcare providers and teachers to disseminate current research and share ideas.

The focus in 2012 is on Holistic Healthcare for Performing Artists.

The conference takes place on 1st and 2nd December 2012 at the University of Sydney. Check the ASPAH 2012 conference website for further information.

News for Performing Arts Medicine practitioners/post-graduate students: the deadline for abstract submissions has now been extended to Friday 17th August 2012.

Justin Howse IADMS Lifetime Service Award

Monday, March 14th, 2011

BAPAM would like to extend our congratulations to Mr Justin Howse on his receipt of a Lifetime Service Award from the International Association for Dance Medicine & Science!

JUSTIN-HOWSE IADMS AWARD

IADMS
Lifetime Service Award

Mr A.J.G (Justin) Howse

MB BS FRCS FISEM

In honor of your exemplary service to dancers
and your outstanding contributions to
dance medicine and dance science

2010

Justin Howse is a Consultant Orthopaedic Surgeon, former BAPAM Trustee and Senior Physician with vast experience within the performing arts especially concerning dance. He has contributed to numerous publications and is co-author of the book Dance Technique & Injury Prevention, now in its 4th edition.

Justin has lectured worldwide on dance injuries.  He was also Orthopaedic Consultant to The Royal Ballet School, The English National Ballet (company and school), The Royal Academy of Dancing and the Royal Society of Musicians amongst others. He is now retired and travels as much as his hectic schedule allows.

Congratulations!