Posts Tagged ‘Ergonomics’

Survey: Musical ergonomics in professional UK orchestras

Thursday, February 9th, 2017

Are you a musician working in a professional UK-based orchestra? Could you help us support research into performer healthcare by completing a short anonymous survey on musical ergonomics?

If so, please read the information below before you complete the survey. The survey should take no more than 5 minutes.

Subject: A survey of musicians’ knowledge, access to and use of musical ergonomics in professional UK orchestras.

Hello my name is Teresa Airley, and I would like to invite musicians’ aged 18 years or over, working in professional UK-based orchestras, to participate in a voluntary and anonymous survey on musical ergonomics.  I am undertaking an MSc in performing arts medicine at University College London, and I am interested in learning what motivates musicians to use ergonomic aids.

What are ergonomics? Ergonomics are aids that support musicians within their working environment.  These can be instrument specific adaptations to help reduce playing discomfort, or improve playing posture.  For example chin or thumb rests, or straps to support instrument weight and maintain good posture.  Or, advice on healthy practice such as posture, warm-ups, stretches, and regular breaks.  Environmental ergonomics include appropriate seating, lighting, and hearing protection within performing venues.

Why is this study being done?  Musicians are at risk of developing playing-related injuries.  Education on healthy practice and use of ergonomic aids can help to reduce, or prevent injuries.  My survey explores what motivates musicians to use ergonomic aids, and how knowledge of musical ergonomics is acquired, and what benefits or barriers there are to using ergonomics at work.

Consent: Completing the survey implies consent to participate in this research study, and as participation is anonymous it will not be possible to withdraw your data once you have completed your questionnaire.

How and what data will be collected, and where will it be stored? This survey is anonymous and all information you provide is confidential.   No individuals will be identified in any reports arising from this research.  The survey is available via Opinio and all data gathered is held securely within University College London data centres.  This project has been approved by the UCL Research Ethics Committee.

Contact information: If you would like more information regarding the study please email me direct at teresa.airley.15@ucl.ac.uk Please visit the British Association for Performing Arts Medicine (BAPAM) website at www.bapam.org.uk for further information on specialist health support available to performing artists.  Free specialist medical advice is available from BAPAM.  For enquiries telephone: 020 7404 8444 or email: info@bapam.org.uk

Access the survey here

Thank you for your time.

BAPAM Training Day – Brass and Hearing

Wednesday, August 17th, 2016

Our next Performing Arts Medicine Training Day focuses on Hearing and Brass instruments.

Saturday 19 November
9.15am – 4.30pm

National Council For Voluntary Organisations
8 All Saints Street
London, N1 9RL

We’re looking forward to learning from uniquely experienced healthcare practitioners and arts professionals. This is a great chance to share expertise with peers, make connections and grow our performing arts medicine network. BAPAM Performing Arts Medicine Training Days are ideal for people working in healthcare, and all those engaged in wellbeing in the creative arts, who want to develop their skills in this fascinating specialism.

Full price tickets are £120 with discounts available for BAPAM Registered Practitioners, BAPAM Clinicians and Performing Arts Medicine MSc students.

If you prefer not to book online, please call us on 020 7404 5888.

The provisional schedule for this event is below. Timings and titles will be confirmed shortly.

9.15 – 9.45  Registration and Coffee

9.45 – 12.45 Morning session (includes coffee break):

The effect of air pressure in brass players: Dr Alan Watson, Anatomist & Neuroscientist, Cardiff University

Demonstration of brass playing and ergonomic adaptations: Dr Jonathan White, GP & BAPAM Clinician, Birmingham; Owen Wallage, Tuba player & member RAF music services

Tinnitus: Nic Wray, Communications Manager, British Tinnitus Association

Lunch 12.45 – 1.30

1.30 – 4.30 Afternoon session (includes tea break):

Age-related hearing loss: Dr Frances Williams, Consultant Rheumatologist, Musicians and Performing Artists Clinic Leader, St Thomas’ Hospital London & Researcher in Age-related hearing loss, King’s College London.

Data protection: what every practitioner should know: Paul Ticher, Data Protection consultant

Research presentations: Naomi Norton (RNCM PhD recipient): The role of music teachers in health promotion

MSc prizewinners – tbc

Lunch is included in the ticket price.

Event Report: ASPAH 2014 Symposium

Friday, March 6th, 2015

Tommi Sliiden, osteopath and a graduate of UCL’s MSc in Performing Arts Medicine, attended the November 2014 Symposium of the Australian Society for Performing Arts Healthcare, to present research into breathing in musical theatre performers. We were pleased to help facilitate this through a BAPAM Research and Education Bursary.

Tommi’s report follows: 

ASPAH 2014 Symposium

Tommi Sliiden M.Sc PAM, B.Ost

The theme of this years ASPAH symposium was The complete performer: Turning evidence into practice, with the focus on research and knowledge that could immediately be integrated and translated into clinical, studio or organisational practice. Participants and speakers included performers, teachers, practitioners and researchers from Australia, Malaysia, Canada, and UK.

Opening

Dr Cliffton Chan and Dr Paul Duff welcomed all participants and officially thanked the indigenous Australians for allowing the borrowing of their land, upon which the University had been built. They were further delighted with the range of this years speakers and the increasing development of research into and practice of Performing Arts Medicine specifically – rather than just “adapted sports medicine”.

Keynote speech

The Central Nervous System as a limiting factor to performance and recovery from injury, by Victor Popov, one of Australia’s leading Sports Physiotherapists with a long experience of and interest in Performing Arts medicine. He pointed out the importance of considering the complex and non-linear role of the CNS in order to achieve successful training or treatments, rather than just focusing on mechanical repair and symptomatic relief.

The performance is an expression of skill that is in turn a highly refined motor pattern.  If proprioception is dysfunctional, the execution will be dysfunctional. Poorly co-ordinated contraction and muscle tone pattern easily leads to overuse injury. It is therefore important to appropriately engage CNS in training and treatment – sometimes musculoskeletal injury is related to CNS ‘overload’. By modulating the input to CNS, the output will be changed.

Presentation, 20 min

The Vocal athlete: An introduction to the Estill Method, by Gerald Marko, an Austrian born, Melbourne based singer, musician, lecturer, researcher and Certified Master Teacher of the Estill Method and Course Instructor with testing privileges (the highest of their teaching qualifications). His interest in Estill voice training grew early in his singing career, while performing in musicals in Europe, often expected to sing in a vast range of styles, and through his frustration of his own limited level of knowledge but more so, the lack of helpful coaching and teaching. Coaching rarely included clear, objective instructions with reference to various anatomical structures and muscular activity but often focused on achieving subjective feelings and sensations through, many times vague or nonsensical instructions and imagery that was difficult to interpret, such as the advice he once had been given: “Think yellow!”.

The Estill Method uses research based knowledge of anatomy and vocal physiology and focuses on the ability to safely produce various types of sounds and voice qualities by learning to control the specific structures in the vocal mechanism. It includes a series of exercises specifically designed to individually move any of the thirteen identified involved structures, is used to enable reproduction of any of the six arbitrary voice qualities (speech, falsetto, sob, twang, belting, opera) and variations of them.

Care is taken to develop kinaesthetic feedback and to recognise, locate and control the level of effort to enable safe work.

Though the so called “power, source, filter model” for voice production is used (airflow creating power; vibrating vocal folds as the source of sound waves; vocal tract (area from vocal folds to lips) as filter for further shaping and colouring of the tiny sound produced by vocal folds), more focus is put on the control of vocal folds and vocal tract and their interaction, with less focus on breathing.

The Estill Method puts more emphasis on the craft of control of vocal mechanism, rather than “artistry and performance magic”, and makes no subjective judgments such what voice is “pretty” etc. The method is used to help to reproduce any required sound safely and thus useful for any style of music, and can be useful for both singing and voice therapy.

This short presentation acted as an introduction to the afternoon workshop.

Free papers, 10 min each

(I chose to attend the first four)

The relationship between dancer perceptions of dance floor properties, dance floor force reduction and in situ vertical deformation, by Dr Luke Hopper at the Western Australian Academy of Performing Arts, a Sports scientist specialising in clinical biomechanics including 3D motion capture. This study included comparisons of 15 dancers’ perception of how “sprung” four different floor samples were, compared to the vertical deformation carefully measured by specialised cameras. Their study showed that the dancers, as a group, demonstrated the ability to differentiate small variations in floor mechanical properties (0.5-1.5 mm), something that could be used as an assessment method of dance floors, rather than expensive testing equipment. However; an individual dancer’s perception would on its own not provide a statistically relevant accurate representation.

Comments from the dancers also included that some floors could be perceived as “too soft” and working on a harder floor could be seen, by them, as “safer”, as they would know what to expect, and could better rely on their own skilled dance technique to adapt.

Feeling the sound: Finger proprioception in violin pedagogy, by Dr Marina Robinson, a violinist and lecturer in violin at the Sydney Conservatorium of Music, with added personal experience within this field from having to rehabilitate and retrain following an earlier, serious injury. Her ongoing studies in this field investigate how proprioceptive training and cross-disciplinary learning can enhance violin pedagogy. Testing 24 elite violinists’ proprioceptive acuity showed that there were no overall differences between either hand for their chosen specific tests, indicating that, in spite of the difference in tasks, there are significant proprioceptive demands for both left and right hands. She also talked about how proprioception responds to specific training, is correlated with performance acuity and improves with increased age and experience.

Behind ten equally strong fingers, by Dr Therese Milanovic, a Brisbane based pianist and educator with 11 years experience of learning and teaching the Taubman Approach. She gave insight into causes behind the experience of weak fingers, and the importance of considering the synchronisation between fingers, hand, arm, and even the posture of the rest of the body. She talked about how she uses demonstrations, video examples and step-by-step checklists, to address problems rather than, as often happens in teaching, merely pointing out what not to do, or using independent exercises and monotonous drills in repetitive patterns.

The benefits of ergonomically scaled piano keyboard for smaller handed pianists: Leveling the playing field, by Erica Booker, a Sydney pianist and Suzuki piano teacher trainer, presented her ongoing research in muscular effort and functional load (and the risk of performance injuries). So far, ten pianists, aged up to 14 years, have had their forearm flexor and extensor muscles tested using electromyography whilst playing on a ergonomically scaled piano keyboard (5.5 inch octave) and again on regular full sized model (6.5 inch octave).

The current piano keyboard was standardised in the 1880s, based on what suited male virtuosos at the time, such as Liszt, and research has shown that a small hand span is a risk factor for injuries and that it is affecting females, with often smaller hands than men, disproportionately.

A case of facial peripheral neuropathy in a flautist, by David Peterson, physiotherapist for, among others, Sydney Symphony Orchestra. David discussed a recent case study of a single flautist and the specific patient-centered management approach and outcome.

Health promotion in a sample of elite tertiary student-musicians, by Michael Ingle, a Sydney physiotherapist and trombonist. A study that evaluated the effectiveness of a web-based health promotion course (Sound Performers), in a group of elite musicians at the Australian National Academy of Music.

Findings from the Student Musician Health Survey at Universiti Pendidikan Sultan Idris, Malaysia, by Dr Dr Karen Lonsdale, a music graduate with a doctorate involving research in injury prevention and management of flautists. The results of their online, self-reporting survey that attracted 98 full-time undergraduates and post graduates, were consistent with previous studies on musicians health; 29% were currently suffering from playing-related pain, 47% had experienced it at some time, and 57% felt they had not received enough information or advice on playing-related health during their current studies.

Playing-related pain in bowed string students: Preliminary results, by Judith Robitaille, a violinist and Occupational therapist in Québec. Judith presented results from their prospective cohort study of 152 young string students at three different summer camps.  Using questionnaires distributed few week before the camp and again one week into the camp, they inquired about playing habits, playing-related pain and its impact, and found that playing time had increased from 16 hours/week before the camp, to 33 hours/week during the camp, and found the prevalence of playing related musculoskeletal pain being as high as 96%.

Paper Streams, 25 min

Actors health and wellbeing in Australia: Further analysis of 2013 Actors Survey, by Prof Ian Maxwell, Dr Marianna Szab and Dr Mark Seton, all from University of Sydney. Presentation of results from the Equity (Australia) on-line survey 2013, with 782 respondents, that had gathered information of actors’ professional experiences including training, and income from both acting and non-acting sources as well as aspects of health and wellbeing using validated instruments measuring depression, anxiety, eating disorders, alcohol and drug use.

Elite Australian singer – Career stories, by Kathleen Connell, Sydney-based vocal coach, researcher and singer.  Using questionnaires and interviews of a cross section of singers with active careers between 1985-2005 and using established career theoretical concepts from other fields of work, she had investigated singers’ career maintenance and planning, especially in the latter stages of a career with their transition into other areas and potential changes to identity. Further study looked at how entrepreneurial methods, and the identification of a variety of capabilities, can help plan and sustain a career as well as a transition into other fields or professions.

An evaluation of the breathing strategies and maximum phonation time in musical theatre performer during controlled performance tasks, by Tommi Sliiden. The first research of it’s kind, testing 20 professional West End musical performers’ ability to sing long, sustained notes and how that ability is affected by the increased heart rate and effort of dancing; measuring changes to breathing pattern and heart rates whilst repeating (at a performance-like intensity) a chosen 3 minute extract from a musical number taken from their respective show in three different ways: singing only (standing still); dancing only (in silence); and combined, simultaneous singing and dancing (as in show).

Results showed that maximum phonation time was on average reduced to a third, and heart rate nearly doubled, immediately after fully singing and dancing the number. Lung volume per breath remained the same during dancing only, as during singing only (only breathing rate was increased – to the double). Singing restricted the spontaneous breathing used during dancing only, resulting in a reduction of air usage per minute (by 16%) when combining the two.

A questionnaire showed that only 45% of our performers had felt able to combine these two tasks, to their full potential, by opening night.

Workshops, 1h 40 min each

(I chose to attend the last one)

Posture, balance, symmetry and flow, with Victor Popov. With reference to his earlier speech, he elaborated on practical techniques for improvement of the Central Nervous System parameters of posture, balance symmetry and flow, functional posture training, awareness exercises, pain management and how ‘flow’ can be taught to enhance both expression and rehabilitation.

Optimising music performance: a systematic approach to dynamic postural analysis, with Dr Bronwen Ackermann, physiotherapist, researcher and educator. By using a template previously tested and clinically applied successfully to the Australian Youth Orchestra, a framework was provided to evaluate the posture of musicians with their instruments, in a more static position as well as during performance.

Introduction to muscular voice training – Pushing breath is what’s hurting you, with Gerald Marko. Following the presentation earlier in the day, Gerald demonstrated with great enthusiasm and knowledge the different voice qualities used within the Estill Method (speech, falsetto, sob, twang, belting, opera). He used his own impressive vocal skills to illustrate the various sounds and how they can be varied with subtle, controlled changes to various structures and muscles involved in voice production. Video laryngoscopic images of the larynx and vocal folds highlighted some differences seen when producing different voice qualities. We had a demonstration of Voiceprint™ software, a real-time spectral analysis program that records, analyses, and plays back the voice, giving audiovisual feedback about pitch and voice quality, used to enhance the learning and rehabilitation process.

He further explained the basic mechanics of breathing, the involvement of both active and more passive structures – including muscular control and elastic rib recoil, and how the different voice qualities naturally utilise different amounts of air and produce different levels of loudness, pointing out that production of loud volume is not necessarily a result of increased air volume or pressure, and furthermore, how excessive use of abdominal and other respiratory muscles to increase pressure can even be damaging to the larynx, depending on what voice quality and larynx position is used.

Breathing, especially when no sound production is used, often comes naturally, involving various automatic processes, and the Estill method focuses more on the ability to control the larynx and vocal tract, rather than breath control, something that is often emphasised rather more within other types of vocal training. Gerald used the analogue of sailing to explain – breath does indeed provides the power of voice production, like the wind does for sailing, but it is the ability to control the boat and sails to successfully and safely adapt to the wind that is important, not trying to change the wind – “Thus, it’s called sailing – not winding ”.

Closing

Dr Cliffton Chan and Dr Paul Duff thanked all participants and speakers for a successful and interesting day, and presented ASPAHs Career Development Award as well as the award for the winning contribution to this years online competition to create a YouTube clip promoting this year’s symposium!

Post-Symposium

The Symposium was highly inspiring, with a lot of varied speakers within different fields and interesting participants from different backgrounds to discuss the topics and other work related matters; comparing similarities and differences.

During the week that followed the symposium, I had the opportunity to get in contact with some of the other participants and speakers, including Dr Cliffton Chan, 2014 Symposium Chair, and his colleague, the Principal Physiotherapist at Potts Point Physiotherapy, David Peterson, who invited me to the Sydney Opera House to learn more about treating members of the Australian Opera and Ballet Orchestra.

As a final treat, I managed to get a ticket for the Sydney Symphony Orchestra’s concert, “Symphonic Firsts”, performing Brahms’ Piano Concerto No.1 and Mahler’s Symphony No.1 in the magnificent main hall of the Opera House, with the final piece performed by over 120 musicians in the orchestra! A spectacular evening finished off outside on the terrace overlooking the Harbour Bridge, enjoying a glass of Australian wine in the balmy summer evening.

New and Updated Health Information Factsheets

Wednesday, January 21st, 2015

We know that a career in the performing arts can be physically and psychologically tough. Whether you’re on stage or behind the scenes, it takes a lot to keep the show on the road. BAPAM helps many people overcome health challenges that arise while they are working or studying in our industry.

Our free online Factsheets are designed to help you look after yourself and perform at your peak. They include advice about preparing for performance, from physical warm-ups to psychological self-care, coping with anxiety and challenging working conditions, caring for your voice, hearing, taking care of nutrition and alcohol consumption.

Click here for all of our Factsheets.

These materials are a developing resource, as we bring the expertise gained through our clinical practice and Trainer Network to focus on making key information available to all performing arts professionals and students. Look out for new BAPAM health resources throughout 2015 and please get in touch with Information Officer, Dan Hayhurst (dan@bapam.org.uk), with any comments and suggestions.

BAPAM Warm Ups Leaflet

Our Warm-up Exercises for Musicians pocket-sized leaflet is just one of our updated health resources

Event Report – State of Play 2013

Monday, April 8th, 2013

Event organiser, Ian MacDonald, reports on the State of Play – A study day for performers, healthcare practitioners, music teachers, manufacturers and modifiers of musical instruments,  23rd March 2013. 

This mini-conference was inspired by all the wonderful inventions, additions and props created by passionate musicians, teachers and practitioners to assist their performing. Though for some, the process of amending and/or adjusting ‘the musical interface’ (the instrument) is second nature – better facilitating them to do what they love – it strikes me that it is still generally considered a black art.

Where adapting the traditional instrument dimensions in a bespoke manner really comes into its own, is in helping youngsters play instruments without injury and in helping musicians recover from injury and accident. There is also amazing work being done with disabled children and adults at places like www.joyofsound.net, creating guitars that have special vibrating panels for deaf people, cellos that are fixed and angled to make wheelchair approach possible, two-way zithers that have double docking space for two wheelchair users to sit at it etc.

Playing aids, props, straps, rests etc are of course of interest to clinicians and practitioners working with performers but often either practitioners don’t know specific items exist, or have seen products on the web but are not sure how they work in practice or indeed if they actually work safely as empirical evidence supporting the marketing claims is difficult to find.

State of Play delegates were a mixture of professional performers, conservatoire teachers, students, lecturers, researchers, healthcare professionals, musicians and a dancer. A number had suffered some form of nerve compression problem in the past so had a vested interest in the presenting subject. Across the board, feedback about the day was positive with particular pleasure from all in seeing a right-handed trumpet being taken apart by Dave Woodhead then reassembled for a left-handed player with cable ties in about 5 minutes; perfectly playable with no need for any new bits to be made. Dave explained to us that there is no limit to adjustments you can make to brass instruments. Materials can be changed for look, weight or to avoid allergic reaction. Crooks (U-shaped bits of the tubing) and the direction of tubing can be shaped and amended to suit hand size, arm length, neck length or to assist getting back to playing again post-trauma….in fact there is now a small plastic trombone on the market that is light and easier to control even if you are a small person of 6 or 7. And it sounds okay too!

Marcus Reynolds presented his invention, Stratos, demonstrating it with a nifty trombone solo. He has worked on the Stratos for many years, since a serious accident left him injured. The device is used to facilitate better lip, jaw and head posture for trombonist (and for all other brass instrumentalists) as well as to provide structural and stabilising support. It was great news to hear that he is now getting commissions from all over the country to reward him for the dedicated years, time, money and sheer genius of creation.

The afternoon gave us the duet of Nicole Wilson and Helena Wood, violinists with ENO Orchestra. All the delegates agreed that these two musicians could go on the road with a fantastic presentation covering their experience in the working environment, ergonomics, musicianship, technical expertise, knowledge of the great variety of available equipment (e.g. chin and neck rests, seating) and their extremely funny way of communicating all these ideas.

Guitar tutor, Paul Sogaard rounded off the day, expertly reviewing the different posture issues faced by the three main designs of guitar, acoustic, electric and bass. As a long time member of the BAPAM Directory of Performing Arts Medicine Practitioners, he focused on many of the ergonomic problems tackled by musicians, demonstrating the various adjustments to the guitar interface and discussing the eternal questions of what additional tools and equipment (if any) to use… Again, research into the long term health benefits of using foot stool, neck straps or ergoplay support is sparse.

Student Research Projects

The day also included representatives from the first year of the MSc in Performing Arts Medicine with presentations from Efthalia Palaiokastriti, Physiotherapist and guitarist (Investigating functional scoliosis in guitarists using different guitar support tools), Isabel Artigues Cano, Physiotherapist and flautist (Evaluating hypermobility of finger joints in flautists) and Dr Hara Trouli’s (Performance measures in pianists with clinical sympomatology in the upper limbs: a cross-sectional study using EMG, digital pianos recordings and video postural analysis).

The State of Play 2013 – Musical Instrument Day

Thursday, February 14th, 2013

Saturday 23rd March

10:00-17:00
(Registration from 09:30)
Saturday 23rd March

The Old Refectory, Wilkins Building, Main Quadrangle, University College London WC1E 6BT

A study day for performers, healthcare practitioners, music teachers, manufacturers and modifiers of musical instruments

Enhancing performance and facilitating healthier practice

Bespoke instrument modifications and manufacturing technology

Investigating tools for musicians’ rehabilitation from injury

Configuring the musical interface for healthy performance

Musical instrument ergonomics 

Sessions focusing on brass, strings and guitar

Full Day £75 Half Day £40

BAPAM Practitioner £65

Students £50

To reserve your place please email admin@bapam.org.uk and we’ll send you a booking form. 

More information: State of Play Instrument Day Programme

Photo: MFHiatt

Taubman Approach Symposium

Tuesday, February 5th, 2013

The Golandsky Institute present a symposium on the Taubman Approach, an instrumental playing technique that many musicians find useful in preventing playing related injuries and in overcoming problems if they do occur. The symposium will cover the application of the technique to both piano and violin.

The Symposium takes place at St John’s College, Cambridge, March 23rd and 24th 2013.

Further information and booking

 

Musicians Health Day

Tuesday, November 13th, 2012

Honorary Lecturers for the MSc in Performing Arts Medicine, Jennie Morton and Ian MacDonald, have organised this practical day for educators and health professionals involved in the care of musicians, to be held at UCL on 15th December 2012 (please note: this is an independent training event and is not organised by BAPAM).

Musicians Health Day 2012

Saturday 15th December 2012

10:00am – 5.00pm

University College London

Wilkins Haldane Room, Gower Street, London. WC1E 6BT

The day will include:

A comprehensive overview of orchestral instruments

Common injuries in musicians

Practical assessment of the instrumental musician

Instrument ergonomics and adaptations

Healthy practise advice

7 hours CPD

Course Fee: £95 (Students £75)

Course Tutors:

Jennie Morton BSc (Hons) Osteopathy

UCL Honorary Lecturer for the MSc in Performing Arts Medicine

Osteopath & Lecturer for The British Association for Performing Arts Medicine

Ian MacDonald MSc (Vocal Pathology); Dip RCM; ARCM; ALCM

UCL Course Tutor and Honorary Lecturer for MSc in Performing Arts Medicine

Voice Pathologist and Rehabilitation Specialist for The British Association for Performing Arts Medicine

Guest Lecturer Royal Academy of Music and Royal College of Music in Health Promotion & Professional Development

For further info or to request a booking form, please email jennie@jenniemorton.co.uk

Performing Arts Medicine Videos: PAMI Conference

Wednesday, October 24th, 2012

Here is a great archive of all the talks from the recent Performing Arts Medicine Conference in Galway, organised by PAMI. The first such event to be held in Ireland, the day featured BAPAM clinicians, Dr Mike Shipley and Dr Juliet Bressan; Osteopath and Performing Arts Medicine MSc lecturer, Jennie Morton; Vocal health adviser and PAM MSc Director, Ian MacDonald  and many more leading Performing Arts Medicine experts. A fantastic resource for all those interested in this fascinating medical specialism.

Hitting the Right Medical Notes – An article about the PAMI Conference by June Shannon for the Irish Times.

You can see all of the videos here

Musical Instrument Appeal

Monday, September 24th, 2012

Photo: Paul J S

BAPAM needs new (old) toys! We’re putting out a request for donations of unwanted musical instruments – of any kind (though we don’t have room for a Wurlitzer) – Brass, Woodwind, Strings, Percussion. Even parts of instruments and broken instruments:

Unwanted
Old
Broken
Stringless
Chin rest without the instrument
Without mouthpieces
Damaged pads

We help musicians with medical problems caused by or affecting their playing. Our doctors need to see how musicians’ bodies work with their instruments, honing our expertise in instrument ergonomics, and our understanding of their composition and construction.

BAPAM has a key role in training medical practitioners through the Performing Arts Medicine MSc qualification at University College London.  Getting to grips with these occasionally obscure implements is an integral part of the MSc learning experience. We need Performing Arts Medicine specialists to know their autoharp from their euphonium.

Photo: Kaensu

So can you help us? Do you have old, unloved musical instruments taking up space in your life? Email Ian.Macdonald@bapam.org.uk and we’ll gratefully give them a new home.