Posts Tagged ‘Ergonomics’

Musical Instrument Appeal

Monday, September 24th, 2012

Photo: Paul J S

BAPAM needs new (old) toys! We’re putting out a request for donations of unwanted musical instruments – of any kind (though we don’t have room for a Wurlitzer) – Brass, Woodwind, Strings, Percussion. Even parts of instruments and broken instruments:

Unwanted
Old
Broken
Stringless
Chin rest without the instrument
Without mouthpieces
Damaged pads

We help musicians with medical problems caused by or affecting their playing. Our doctors need to see how musicians’ bodies work with their instruments, honing our expertise in instrument ergonomics, and our understanding of their composition and construction.

BAPAM has a key role in training medical practitioners through the Performing Arts Medicine MSc qualification at University College London.  Getting to grips with these occasionally obscure implements is an integral part of the MSc learning experience. We need Performing Arts Medicine specialists to know their autoharp from their euphonium.

Photo: Kaensu

So can you help us? Do you have old, unloved musical instruments taking up space in your life? Email Ian.Macdonald@bapam.org.uk and we’ll gratefully give them a new home.

Musical Athletes

Thursday, July 5th, 2012

This Weekend, 7th/8th July, the Cheltenham Music Festival plays host to Musical Athletes, a series of talks on the musical body – how it works, how it sometimes doesn’t work, and how it can be fixed. Organised jointly by BAPAM and the Cheltenham Festivals Laboratory, the event takes a look at the musculoskeletal demands on musicians’ bodies, voice production, injuries and breathing techniques, as well as complementary therapies including Alexander Technique and Mindfulness.

Aaron Williamon, Professor of Performance Science at the Royal College of Music, will be analysing the physiological effects of performance on concert pianist, Melvyn Tan, by measuring his heart rate, breathing, skin temperature and posture during his solo recital on Sunday morning. You can read more about Professor Williamon’s project in this Guardian piece by Tom Service (4th July, 2012).

Back by Popular Demand – An Introduction to Treating the Performing Artist

Wednesday, June 6th, 2012

Jennie Morton,osteopath and lecturer & module leader for the UCL/BAPAM Performing Arts Medicine MSc, is repeating her one-day course, An Introduction To Treating The Performing Artist, on Sunday July 1st at the British School of Osteopathy in London.

AN INTRODUCTION TO TREATING THE PERFORMING ARTIST
a one-day CPD course for musculoskeletal practitioners

Sunday July 1st 2012

10.00am – 5.00pm

at

THE BRITISH SCHOOL OF OSTEOPATHY – Berthon Room

275, Borough High Street. London. SE1 1JE

Common injuries in Dancers, Instrumental Musicians, Vocalists & Actors

Assessment, treatment & management approaches for performers

The postural, ergonomic & technique issues faced by performing artists

The environmental challenges for performing artists

7 Hours CPD

Course Fee £85 (Students £70)

Course Tutor:

Jennie Morton BSc (Hons) Osteopathy

UCL Honorary Lecturer & Module Leader for the MSc in Performing Arts Medicine, UCL Division of Surgery & Interventional Science

Osteopath & Lecturer for The British Association for Performing Arts Medicine

Speaker for Dance UK: Healthier Dancer Programme

For further info or to request a booking form, please email jennie@jenniemorton.co.uk

Gig Grips Drumstick Grips

Wednesday, May 30th, 2012

“The most dangerous musical instrument is the drums,” says Dr Jaume Rosset i Llobet, Director of the Institute of Physiology and Medicine of Art-Terrassa, Barcelona (and co-author of the excellent, The Musician’s Body, A Maintenance Manual for Peak Performance).

For the last couple of years the Institute has been testing the effectiveness of Gig Grips Drumstick Grips, which were developed to enable drummers to play without over-gripping their sticks. “We have used Gig Grips for those patients who need to reduce the grip force used to play, such as those with traumatic hand injuries or over-use symptoms. We are very pleased with the results and will continue using Gig Grips with our patients.”

Over-gripping can also be caused by the tendency to grip harder as sticks start to slip whilst playing. This happens mostly during gigs where sweaty conditions and the pressure of performance combine. Over time, tension combined with the impact of hitting drums can lead to career-limiting injuries. The idea behind Gig Grips is to help by enabling drummers to play with a more relaxed and natural grip, reducing muscle tension, vibrations and impact shock.

They are produced by Think9 Ltd, a company focused on innovative percussion product development. You can learn more about Gig Grips at the website: www.giggrips.com.

Note: We haven’t tested Gig Grips here at BAPAM and can’t provide information on their effectiveness (though they’ve had lots of good feedback from professional drummers). We’d love to hear from any drummers out there who’ve tried them – what do you think?

Ireland’s first International Conference of Performing Arts Medicine

Tuesday, May 29th, 2012

Performing Arts Medicine Ireland present:

Musicians Health 2012 – Keeping the Show on the Road
Presentations on the identification and treatment of important health problems in musicians

Saturday October 13th 2012 at the Radisson Blu Hotel, Galway.

Speakers include:

Consultant Rheumatologist to BAPAM, Dr Mike Shipley
Clinical Specialist in Hand Therapy, Katherine Butler
Senior Lecturer in Anatomy and Neuroscience, Dr Alan Watson
Consultant Speech & Language Therapist, Ms Christella Antoni
Dr Alice Brandfonbrener, MD, a founder of PAMA
Consultant Neurologist & Clinical Neurophysiologist, Dr Fiona Molloy
Lecturer and Field Leader in Exercise Physiology, Dr Marcus Smith
Consultant Hand Surgeon, Mr Ian Winspur

Please visit musicianshealth2012.com for full information and registration details.

Physician €120.00

Non Physician / Allied Health Professional €90.00

Student / Resident €60.00

Performing Arts Medicine Ireland is a new organisation founded by Dr Juliet Bressan, Director of the Dublin Performing Arts Medical Centre and founder of the Musicians’ Dystonia Clinic at St Vincent’s (as well as BAPAM’s Dublin doctor), Dr Ronan Kavanagh, a Rheumatologist who runs The Musicians Clinic in The Galway Clinic, Dr Pat Harold, a Family Doctor and Writer from the West of Ireland and Dr Sean Smyth, Ennis based GP, All-Ireland champion on both fiddle and whistle and member of Lúnasa.

How to be a Healthy Musician

Tuesday, May 15th, 2012

A FREE event at St Nicholas Church, Dyke Rd; Brighton.

Saturday May 19th 2012, 4-5pm.

Part of the series, The Musicians Body.

Drusilla Redman, physiotherapist, lecturer and health advisor to the Guildhall School of Music & Drama and BAPAM discusses the benefits of being strong, fit and healthy in order to maximise musical potential and to handle the demands of performance.

Presented by Music Of Our Time and supported by BAPAM.

An Introduction to Treating The Performing Artist

Wednesday, March 28th, 2012

Jennie Morton, osteopath and lecturer & module leader for the UCL/BAPAM Performing Arts Medicine MSc, presents a one-day CPD course for musculoskeletal practitioners:

AN INTRODUCTION TO TREATING THE PERFORMING ARTIST

Sunday April 15th 2012

10.00am – 5.00pm

at

THE BRITISH SCHOOL OF OSTEOPATHY – Berthon Room

275, Borough High Street. London. SE1 1JE

The day will include:

Common injuries in Dancers, Instrumental Musicians, Vocalists & Actors

Assessment, treatment & management approaches for performers

The postural, ergonomic & technique issues faced by performing artists

The environmental challenges for performing artists

7 Hours CPD

Course Fee £85 (Students £70)

Course Tutor:

Jennie Morton BSc (Hons) Osteopathy

UCL Honorary Lecturer & Module Leader for the MSc in Performing Arts Medicine, UCL Division of Surgery & Interventional Science

Osteopath & Lecturer for The British Association for Performing Arts Medicine

Speaker for Dance UK: Healthier Dancer Programme

For further info or to request a booking form, please email jennie@jenniemorton.co.uk

BAPAM November Training Day Programme

Tuesday, November 15th, 2011

Our November 19th Training Event focusses on Long Term Health Issues Affecting Performing Artists with presentations covering:

Sensory Motor Release (GP/Physio)

Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation of Disabled, Elderly and Multi-talented Performers (Rheumatologist)

Chronic Pain (Rheumatologist)

Ageing and Performance Q&A with Gabrielle Hamilton (actor), Fergus Early (dancer) and Catherine Butler Smith (musician)

Plus, performing arts medicine practitioners can learn from and with professional musicians in two practical sessions with violinist (and Alexander Technique teacher), Ron Colyer, and clarinettist, Andrew Roberts.

Click here to download the programme

Please note this event is now fully booked.

Attendees should come to the main reception of:

Franklin-Wilkins Building
Stamford Street
London
SE1 9NH

Venue information: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/about/campuses/waterloo.html


Well-being for Cellists

Friday, March 4th, 2011

Cello-Well-Small

Click on the  image for the event flyer.

The London Cello Society‘s Well-being for Cellists workshop takes place on Sunday 13th March 2011 at the Royal Academy of Music. Expert presenters,  Katherine Butler (Preventing Hand Injuries), Selma Gocken (Alexander Technique), Erika Klemperer (Psychodynamic Psychotherapy) and Felicity Vincent (Pilates Method) discuss:

How do we play our instrument in harmony with our design?

How can we take advantage of the wonderful natural coordination we possess as human beings?

How can we pass on to our students the knowledge that will prevent injuries?

What are the emotional challenges of our profession and how do they affect our well-being?

The event costs £50 or just £25 for students/concessions with a 25% discount for LCS members.

Click here for more information and to book your place.

And not waving but drowning? November 2010 BAPAM Training Day

Tuesday, October 5th, 2010

trumpet_for_webUpper limb and breathing issues for performers.

Take a look at the Draft schedule for our November 13th 2010 Training Day (click link). The event takes place at King’s College, London, and features:

French horn-playing, flautist, ergonomist and neuro-anatomist, Dr. Alan Watson, on structures of breath control and injury prevention for musicians and vocalists.

Alexander Technique teacher and trombonist, Tom Clough considers breath control in a practical session with professional brass player, Nick Wright.

Voice Coach, Ian MacDonald, on voice problems of singers and other professional voice users.

Consultant Rheumatologist, Professor Howard Bird, and Orthopaedic Hand Surgeon, Mr Ian Winspur, share their wealth of knowledge about upper limb injuries and non-specific arm pain in musicians. Later on, Ian Winspur will run a session focusing specifically on musicians’ hand injuries.

The day concludes with workshops focusing on percussion and we’ll be looking at playing technique as well as common problems. Hand Therapists, Joan Warrington and Katherine Butler, will look at the practical aspects of examining the hand.

This event costs £65 (£45 for students). To book your place please contact clare@bapam.org.uk and feel free to call us on 020 7404 5888 if you would like more information.

BAPAM training days may be used as part of your CPD portfolio.

More information about our training events can be found on the Training and Professional Development section of our website.