Posts Tagged ‘Health Care Professionals’

Clinical Governance Toolkit

Tuesday, February 5th, 2019

Can BAPAM help your organisation ensure quality of clinical services for performing artists?

Performing arts organisations and businesses which commission or provide health services for artists, or are considering doing so, should comply with quality standards for healthcare to ensure the best service for beneficiaries, use resources effectively and help to manage any liabilities if things should go wrong.

We have just published a new Clinical Governance Toolkit which is available as a free resource.

BAPAM is a clinically led organisation working in the performing arts sector. We have a clinical governance framework in place and are registered with the Care Quality Commission (CQC).

We are available to:

Discuss quality issues in relation to an existing or planned service

Develop policy documents and reporting systems that allow you to continually monitor the quality of service delivery

Support the scrutiny of your service

We spoke to Dr Penny Wright, BAPAM Honorary Medical Director, to help demystify the topic of clinical governance.

Why is clinical governance important?

It’s a way of guaranteeing the quality of clinical services for patients: I think it’s most important to look at clinical governance from the patient’s point of view in the first instance. Patients often feel vulnerable when coming through the door, so they need to know they’re getting a service that is expert, that is going to come up with the right answer to their problem, backed up by evidence, in an environment which is caring and respectful of them, and where any risk is minimised. From the point of view of those us who are delivering those clinical services, the doctors and other clinicians and the organisations that they work for, making sure that services are of a high quality is also important: if we provide services that are either not of a good quality or not the right services, the ones our patients need, we’re risking the patient getting poor care and we’re risking wasting money and time. There are assumptions that because healthcare practitioners like doctors and nurses are caring and expertly trained, we always provide a good service, but we don’t actually know that (or even know what a ‘good service’ is) if we don’t monitor it and ask questions about how it could be better. Sometimes asking clinical governance questions can be very unpopular! But in the end, asking how we clinicians know that we are doing the right things – and whether we could do better – is in everybody’s best interests.

What does it mean for Performing Arts Medicine providers?

Providers such as BAPAM need to make sure that the service they’re providing is actually effective at treating performers, as they obviously have very special needs and issues. For example, there’s no point in providing performers with physiotherapy advice geared towards sedentary office workers. For care to be effective, providers first need to look at the quality and expertise of the people delivering it: the clinicians that you work with need to be well trained and they need to understand performers in order to provide all the right advice. It’s also about using an evidence base: if you provide a particular form of treatment to a performer, how do you know that it’s the right treatment, that it’s going to help? Underpinning everything has to be this constant questioning, which is ‘how do we know what is the best thing to do for this patient?’ So the evidence base I would say is part of clinical governance. In addition, for whoever is funding the service, “clinical effectiveness is cost effectiveness”, a treatment which works is also likely to be worth the money that it costs.

What does clinical governance mean for patients?

It provides reassurance that the care they’re getting is the right care for them; that it’s delivered in a way which is respectful and professional; and by people who have been appropriately trained. So in a way it is all about standards and, for performers, it’s about receiving career-specific care which is relevant for them in an environment where they feel more understood than they might do in the busy NHS, or in non-specialist freelance or private services.

How can an individual practitioners ensure clinical expertise when working with performers?

I think it’s a combination of training and experience. From the point of view of training, it doesn’t just mean going to conferences and training days, reading journals and things like that, it’s also about networking with specialists in the field and asking advice and learning from them. At BAPAM clinics, our clinicians are always happy to have colleagues sitting in with them. In Performing Arts Medicine in the UK, formal learning opportunities are currently limited but they are out there: there are courses and training days such as those we run at BAPAM, and there are a limited number of specialist journals, or relevant articles in general journals. There are also academic courses that people can go on, like the Performing Arts Medicine MSc at UCL. However, if you’ve got good basic clinical skills in your own area of practice you will also learn simply from seeing lots of performing arts patients: for instance you will learn about problems affecting clarinettists if you see a lot of clarinettists (with their instruments if necessary) and you’ve got the basic skills to ask the right questions about what’s happened to them and why.

Download the BAPAM Clinical Governance Toolkit

January 2019 Newsletter

Tuesday, February 5th, 2019

Our January 2019 Performing Arts Medicine Newsletter is archived here

Contents:

New clinics

Healthy practice training for performing arts professionals and students

BAPAM and the Royal Society of Medicine Event: Occupational Health in the Performing Arts Industry: The Original Gig Economy

Trustee recruitment

Clinical Governance Toolkit

Free webinar series from BAPAM and ISM

Resources for healthy pianists

BAPAM is Recruiting a Full Time Director

Thursday, July 13th, 2017

The British Association for Performing Arts Medicine (BAPAM) is a unique medical charity providing health advice and support to members of the performing arts community. We provide a national Helpline and confidential clinical consultations for performers experiencing performance-related health problems, as well as education and resources on healthy performance practice and professional training in performing arts medicine.

About the role

Following the planned retirement this year of our current chief executive, BAPAM seeks a leader to take the charity forward over what promises to be an exciting new period of ambitious growth in partnership with our principal funder, Help Musicians UK. The role involves strategic and operational leadership of the organisation, including management of a small team of administrative staff and a clinical workforce comprising of voluntary and healthcare professionals working throughout the UK.

For this role we’re looking for someone who is a strong leader, someone who has the ability to innovate and offer creative solutions, whilst thinking strategically. The successful candidate will be passionate about the performing arts and have the ability to be flexible and adaptable whilst displaying personal integrity and high standards of work.

Click here for further information and to apply.

The closing date for applications is Friday 5th August 2017.

Research and Education Bursary Fund

Wednesday, January 23rd, 2013

We are pleased to announce the launch of our Research and Education Bursary Fund. The fund has been created to promote our research networks and knowledge base through support to clinicians and practitioners attending research conferences relevant to research and practice in Performing Arts Medicine.

Clinicians and practitioners listed on BAPAM’s Directory, as well as students involved with our healthcare programmes (e.g. Performing Arts Medicine MSc) are welcome to bid to the fund for a contribution towards their expenses (registration, travel, accommodation).

Our first bursary recipients are Jennie Morton, who will attend the Performing Arts Medicine Association meeting in Toronto to present on Healthy Practice for Musicians, and Naomi Norton, presenting on the Student Advocate Scheme and her Master’s research project Instrumental and Vocal Teachers as Health Promotion Advocates at the British Psychological Society conference in Harrogate in April. Look out for reports from both of those events in the near future.

Payments are made retrospectively and must be supported by:

  1. An expenses claim form and valid receipt for the agreed amount.
  2. A brief written report for this News blog or our Journal (planned for 2013) with content specifically relating to a scientific finding and/or best practice recommendation arising from the conference or a copy of an abstract or speech if making a presentation.
  3. Details of Performing Arts Medicine contacts and institutions for our database and Research Links Web page.

We would also expect you to promote BAPAM and take a range of BAPAM materials for distribution to colleagues and delegates.

There is no formal application process – just contact Deborah Charnock, BAPAM Interim CEO, at deborah@bapam.org.uk.

Musical Athletes First Notes

Tuesday, July 10th, 2012

We had a fantastic time last weekend at the Cheltenham Music Festival where BAPAM, along with the Cheltenham Festivals Laboratory, were responsible for four Musical Athletes sessions.

Our Medical Director, Dr Penny Wright, organised a great series of presentations from a range of healthcare experts and professional performers who gave insights into the variety of health problems they face. The sessions included interviews with performers, talks on performer anatomy (including a live endoscopy!) and demonstrations of Alexander Technique with students from the Guildhall.

A highlight of the weekend was a wonderful performance by renowned pianist Melvyn Tan, who was physiologically monitored by Dr Aaron Williamon, Professor of Performance Science at the Royal College of Music. The fascinating results were presented at a session later that day, as well as an interview with Melvyn on his experiences.

We’ll be compiling a report of this event soon – watch this space!

Ireland’s first International Conference of Performing Arts Medicine

Tuesday, May 29th, 2012

Performing Arts Medicine Ireland present:

Musicians Health 2012 – Keeping the Show on the Road
Presentations on the identification and treatment of important health problems in musicians

Saturday October 13th 2012 at the Radisson Blu Hotel, Galway.

Speakers include:

Consultant Rheumatologist to BAPAM, Dr Mike Shipley
Clinical Specialist in Hand Therapy, Katherine Butler
Senior Lecturer in Anatomy and Neuroscience, Dr Alan Watson
Consultant Speech & Language Therapist, Ms Christella Antoni
Dr Alice Brandfonbrener, MD, a founder of PAMA
Consultant Neurologist & Clinical Neurophysiologist, Dr Fiona Molloy
Lecturer and Field Leader in Exercise Physiology, Dr Marcus Smith
Consultant Hand Surgeon, Mr Ian Winspur

Please visit musicianshealth2012.com for full information and registration details.

Physician €120.00

Non Physician / Allied Health Professional €90.00

Student / Resident €60.00

Performing Arts Medicine Ireland is a new organisation founded by Dr Juliet Bressan, Director of the Dublin Performing Arts Medical Centre and founder of the Musicians’ Dystonia Clinic at St Vincent’s (as well as BAPAM’s Dublin doctor), Dr Ronan Kavanagh, a Rheumatologist who runs The Musicians Clinic in The Galway Clinic, Dr Pat Harold, a Family Doctor and Writer from the West of Ireland and Dr Sean Smyth, Ennis based GP, All-Ireland champion on both fiddle and whistle and member of Lúnasa.