Posts Tagged ‘Health’

New Clinics in Liverpool and Belfast

Wednesday, April 17th, 2019

As part of our commitment to reach and support performers throughout the UK, we are pleased and excited to announce new regional clinics, this time in Liverpool and Belfast starting in May 2019. 

BAPAM are delighted to be working with the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra, who will host the clinic at the Philharmonic Hall, and Dr Marie McKavanagh, a Performing Arts Medicine specialist GP (and musician).

Liverpool Philharmonic have pioneered an exemplary approach to developing and supporting performance excellence through providing specialist health and wellbeing services to orchestra musicians. The positive effects of this investment are proving that performer wellbeing and artistic excellence are interlinked. Taking care of both also makes good business sense. Performers are healthier, happier, take less time off sick and are better prepared for elite performance. Through their key support for the new BAPAM clinic, Liverpool Philharmonic are now helping to bring this approach to the whole performing arts community.

The first clinic will be held on Wednesday 1st May. 

Belfast

BAPAM are also delighted to be working with the Oh Yeah Centre, Belfast’s music hub, who will host the clinic, providing vital support for a healthy and vibrant performing arts community.

The clinic is led by Dr Christine Hunter, a BAPAM and  NHS GP and Medical Adviser to the Ulster Orchestra.

BAPAM’s Belfast Clinic will be held monthly from May 22

Who is the clinic for?

If you make a proportion of your living from, or study in the performing arts, and have a physical or psychological health problem related to your work, BAPAM can help you. BAPAM clinicians can provide an accurate diagnosis and information to help you overcome problems. The BAPAM team can identify the best sources of ongoing care, both in the NHS and from other specialists, and advise you about sources of financial support for people experiencing health problems affecting their ability to work or study.

Other regional clinics:

Glasgow: Friday 10th May, 7th June

Leeds: Thursday 2nd May

How to book a FREE confidential appointment?

Call 020 7404 8444 to register | Or email info@bapam.org.uk

The Relationship Between Occupational Demands and Well-Being of Performing Artists: A Systematic Review

Friday, March 29th, 2019

Simone Willis,  a Performance Science researcher at Cardiff Metropolitan University, has shared with us this recently published paper on the relationship between occupational stress and well-being in performing artists. The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate and synthesise data arising from 20 previous studies. The article is open access and can be read here in Frontiers of Psychology.

The review highlights the need for more high quality research on the relationship between occupational stress and well-being.

 

Psychosocial Practitioner Peer Supervision Group

Wednesday, March 27th, 2019

BAPAM is pleased to support the Peer Supervision Group for psychosocial practitioners who work with performing arts clients.

This group, whose inaugural meetings took place in 2018, opens up the conversation between performing arts and psychological practice. It is developing a growing professional network for counselling, coaching and psychology practitioners who work with performing artists of all kinds. The group meets regularly, roughly every 8 weeks, in central London.

As well as discussing clinical cases and case issues, there is interactive exploration, mutual consultation and support on more general professional practice issues, including ethical issues, boundary and confidentiality areas. Such exchanges of expertise and experience enable members to reflect on and refine best practice in working with performers. The Group offers members the chance to share specialist expertise of particular problem areas and to provide interventions, guidance, information and professional support within a rigorous evidence-based practice and practice-based evidence framework in this developing field. The Group acts as a forum not only for encouraging and developing the highest standards of practice but also for identifying, promoting and supporting new research in the field.

Members of the group use a variety of approaches and come from a range of career backgrounds. Some members bring specialist expertise within the field, for example, working with people in particular arts professions or with certain types of problem. The Group is sensitive to BAME, LGBT+ and other dimensions of difference.

It is hoped that specialised supervision of this type will become available and accessible to many more practitioners on the BAPAM Directory and the Group is keen to encourage this in whatever ways it can. Members are happy to offer advice and suggestions to practitioners wanting to start their own peer supervision group and to find ways of welcoming practitioners new to the Directory to join.

Practitioners interested in finding out more, joining the London group or starting a group of their own are invited to contact Dr Carol Chapman by email at carol@carolchapman.co.uk

Trustee Recruitment

Tuesday, February 19th, 2019

We are are looking for skilled and experienced individuals to join our Board of Trustees and help guide the organisation in assuring service quality, developing new and existing partnerships and expanding our services throughout the performing arts industry.

To apply, please download the Application Pack and return it to BAPAM Director, Claire Cordeaux. You are welcome to contact us for further information.

Occupational Health in the Performing Arts Industry: The Original Gig Economy

Tuesday, February 5th, 2019

 

Wednesday 27th March 
Royal Society of Medicine
London

 

Registration for this event is now open.

Training arts professionals in healthy practice skills is vital, but we believe that healthy individuals also require systematic support from the industry that is built on their work. 

The majority of workers in the performing arts are freelancers and all are likely to, at some point in their career, experience an injury or have other health problems as a result of their work. The particular needs of those in this industry translate to other areas of the national workforce where, with the expansion of the ‘gig-economy’, traditional occupational health provision increasingly may not reach. 

The Occupational Medicine Section of the Royal Society of Medicine and the British Association for Performing Arts Medicine have therefore come together to run a one day educational meeting that will be of interest to a wide range of people with an interest in health and work.

Talks and panels feature leading arts industry and occupational health experts, academics and clinicians, and include consideration of the economic case for investing in health, health promotion, injury prevention and rehabilitation for self-employed workers, key and emerging occupational health issues in the arts sector.

Contributors include:

Professor Aaron Williamon, Royal College of Music, Centre for Performance Science

Zeb Soanes, BBC Radio 4 presenter

Jane Dyball, CEO of Music Publishers Association Group, winner of Music Week Women in Music Award for Outstanding Contribution

Professor Emma Redding, Head of Dance Science, Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music and Dance

Colin Thomas, Chief Medical Officer, BBC

Colonel John Etherington, Director of Defence Rehabilitation and Consultant in Rheumatology and Rehabilitation, Defence Medical Rehabilitation Centre

More information and registration

Clinical Governance Toolkit

Tuesday, February 5th, 2019

Can BAPAM help your organisation ensure quality of clinical services for performing artists?

Performing arts organisations and businesses which commission or provide health services for artists, or are considering doing so, should comply with quality standards for healthcare to ensure the best service for beneficiaries, use resources effectively and help to manage any liabilities if things should go wrong.

We have just published a new Clinical Governance Toolkit which is available as a free resource.

BAPAM is a clinically led organisation working in the performing arts sector. We have a clinical governance framework in place and are registered with the Care Quality Commission (CQC).

We are available to:

Discuss quality issues in relation to an existing or planned service

Develop policy documents and reporting systems that allow you to continually monitor the quality of service delivery

Support the scrutiny of your service

We spoke to Dr Penny Wright, BAPAM Honorary Medical Director, to help demystify the topic of clinical governance.

Why is clinical governance important?

It’s a way of guaranteeing the quality of clinical services for patients: I think it’s most important to look at clinical governance from the patient’s point of view in the first instance. Patients often feel vulnerable when coming through the door, so they need to know they’re getting a service that is expert, that is going to come up with the right answer to their problem, backed up by evidence, in an environment which is caring and respectful of them, and where any risk is minimised. From the point of view of those us who are delivering those clinical services, the doctors and other clinicians and the organisations that they work for, making sure that services are of a high quality is also important: if we provide services that are either not of a good quality or not the right services, the ones our patients need, we’re risking the patient getting poor care and we’re risking wasting money and time. There are assumptions that because healthcare practitioners like doctors and nurses are caring and expertly trained, we always provide a good service, but we don’t actually know that (or even know what a ‘good service’ is) if we don’t monitor it and ask questions about how it could be better. Sometimes asking clinical governance questions can be very unpopular! But in the end, asking how we clinicians know that we are doing the right things – and whether we could do better – is in everybody’s best interests.

What does it mean for Performing Arts Medicine providers?

Providers such as BAPAM need to make sure that the service they’re providing is actually effective at treating performers, as they obviously have very special needs and issues. For example, there’s no point in providing performers with physiotherapy advice geared towards sedentary office workers. For care to be effective, providers first need to look at the quality and expertise of the people delivering it: the clinicians that you work with need to be well trained and they need to understand performers in order to provide all the right advice. It’s also about using an evidence base: if you provide a particular form of treatment to a performer, how do you know that it’s the right treatment, that it’s going to help? Underpinning everything has to be this constant questioning, which is ‘how do we know what is the best thing to do for this patient?’ So the evidence base I would say is part of clinical governance. In addition, for whoever is funding the service, “clinical effectiveness is cost effectiveness”, a treatment which works is also likely to be worth the money that it costs.

What does clinical governance mean for patients?

It provides reassurance that the care they’re getting is the right care for them; that it’s delivered in a way which is respectful and professional; and by people who have been appropriately trained. So in a way it is all about standards and, for performers, it’s about receiving career-specific care which is relevant for them in an environment where they feel more understood than they might do in the busy NHS, or in non-specialist freelance or private services.

How can an individual practitioners ensure clinical expertise when working with performers?

I think it’s a combination of training and experience. From the point of view of training, it doesn’t just mean going to conferences and training days, reading journals and things like that, it’s also about networking with specialists in the field and asking advice and learning from them. At BAPAM clinics, our clinicians are always happy to have colleagues sitting in with them. In Performing Arts Medicine in the UK, formal learning opportunities are currently limited but they are out there: there are courses and training days such as those we run at BAPAM, and there are a limited number of specialist journals, or relevant articles in general journals. There are also academic courses that people can go on, like the Performing Arts Medicine MSc at UCL. However, if you’ve got good basic clinical skills in your own area of practice you will also learn simply from seeing lots of performing arts patients: for instance you will learn about problems affecting clarinettists if you see a lot of clarinettists (with their instruments if necessary) and you’ve got the basic skills to ask the right questions about what’s happened to them and why.

Download the BAPAM Clinical Governance Toolkit

New BAPAM Clinics

Tuesday, February 5th, 2019

We now hold free Performing Arts Medicine clinics in London, Glasgow, Birmingham, Cardiff and Leeds. 

If you make a proportion of your living from, or study in the performing arts, and have a health problem related to your work, we can help you.

Our clinicians are experienced at dealing with the problems performing arts workers frequently face, and can help with an accurate diagnosis and advice including identifying efficient care pathways, both in the NHS and from other specialist individuals and services. The BAPAM team can also advise about the availability of financial support for people experiencing health problems affecting their ability to work or study.

To make an appointment, give us a call on 020 7404 8444.

Free Health and Wellbeing Webinar Series with ISM

Tuesday, February 5th, 2019

Tuesday 5th February to Tuesday 26th February

We have teamed up with the Incorporated Society of Musicians to present a series of free webinars looking at musicians’ health. Our performance health experts will lead the sessions, exploring solutions to problems frequently encountered in music careers. For more information on each session and how to book a free place click here.

Looking after yourself on tour: Tuesday 5th February
Health in the gig economy: Wednesday 13th February
Resilience and bullying in the workplace: Tuesday 19th February
Preventing playing related injury: Tuesday 26th February

 

Performing Arts Medicine (PAM) day

Tuesday, November 27th, 2018

It’s been a busy year for all things Performing Arts Medicine (PAM). Here’s a look back at one of the highlights of the year.

The annual PAM DAY 2018 was held at the Institute of Sport, Exercise and Health on 21st July and organised by the Department of Performing Arts Medicine at UCL. It was a chance for health professionals, stage performers, and students and staff in health sciences and academics to get acquainted with this area. The idea is that they learn about clinical assessments, recovery and rehabilitation specific to performers in music and dance, as well as performer health education and injury prevention.

Programme lead of the Msc at UCL is musckuloskeletal doctor Dr Hara Trouli, who’s also one of BAPAM’s assessing clinicians. Here she is talking about how the day went.

“PAM day was a successful event for BAPAM practitioners and all clinicians and performers who attended. A range of presentations in music and dance with two streams running all day gave attendees the opportunity to learn a variety of topics, to meet MSc graduates and tutors and to hear about their research projects. PAM DAY received great feedback and we are pleased to see the growing interest and participation in these events.”

The Performing Arts Medicine MSc at UCL is a unique programme providing specialised training to those interested or already involved in offering health services to this very special sector of instrumental musicians, singers, dancers, actors and other performing artists.

Applications for the next academic year in September 2019 is open and closes on 26th July 2019. Click here to find out more

BAPAM Performance Environment Day

Tuesday, November 6th, 2018

What would an ideal performance environment look like? Is such a thing even possible when we work in such widely different spaces? How do our environments affect our health, our creativity, our social relationships? What can healthcare professionals, technicians, artists, support organisations and communities do to both support performing arts wellbeing and facilitate excellence in artistic practice?

Our Performance Environment Day explores these topics, from a healthcare perspective and including the experiences of other professionals including artists, technicians, educators and people working in arts support roles, some with additional needs due to illness, injury, difference or disability

You can now read the full programme.

The event takes place at Resource for London on November 17, 9.30 – 17.00.

Tickets are available here.

 


Presentations and Discussion

The Performance Environment: Challenges in the Performing Arts Industry
Sophie Lane, Specialist Performing Arts and Sport Physiotherapist

Saving Your Ears for the Music!
Gladys Akinseye and Jordon Thompson, Clinical Audiologists and Hearing Therapists

Preparing for Challenging Performance Careers
Arran Peck, Athletic Development and Conditioning Coach, National Centre for Circus Arts

Cognitive Function of Adult Amateur Pianists
Dr Marie McKavanagh, GP, MSc Performing Arts Medicine Shipley Rudge Award Winner

Anxiety and Psychological Support for Theatre Productions and Artists
Dr Anna Colton, Chartered Clinical Psychologist

Panel Discussion/Q&A

Do our performance environments facilitate or obstruct artistic practice? How can the ways in which we design, manage, use and share space be a positive factor in healthy practice? Collective support in creative communities, accessibility and participation.

Kris Halpin, Musician/Producer
Robin Townley, CEO Association of British Theatre Technicians
Lisa Tregale, Head of BSO Participate, Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra
Siân Willett, Co-creator of Wellbeing for the Arts

Dan Hayhurst, BAPAM Information Coordinator (Chair)