Posts Tagged ‘medical research’

Research: Vocal Health Awareness in Singing Students and Teachers

Thursday, February 16th, 2017

Dr Anneliese Sayes is a medical doctor and researcher at the Royal College of Music who is investigating the current knowledge levels of vocal anatomy, physiology and pathology in singing students (within the conservatoire and university systems) and singing teachers.

She is inviting participants to fill in a questionnaire (that should take around 10-15 minutes to complete). There is a separate questionnaire for students and teachers. Full information about the study, which has research ethics approval from Conservatoires UK, is also provided. The survey can be accessed online via the following links:

Vocal Awareness questionnaire for student singers

Vocal Awareness questionnaire for singing teachers

Performing Arts Medicine Graduates at IADMS Conference in Hong Kong

Tuesday, November 8th, 2016

We are delighted that two of our Performing Arts Medicine graduates from the University College London Master’s degree in Performing Arts Medicine presented their research results at the International Association for Dance Medicine and Science (IADMS) 26th annual conference at the Hong Kong Academy of Performing Arts.

Susanna Piculell, a Swedish Physiotherapist working in private practice and with the Swedish Volleyball team, undertook research with the Royal Ballet into pre-seasonal screening and injury rates in classical ballet. Since graduating from UCL she has relocated to Sweden and integrated her gained knowledge and skills at Lunds Dans och Musikalgymnasium (a secondary school for dance and musical theatre students), Malmoe Academy of Music and Artists and Musicians health in Malmoe. Experiences from her MSc (including the many observations at the BAPAM clinic) have contributed not only to Susanna’s clinical work but also to new career opportunities. She is now also lecturing on ergonomics and healthy lifestyles for musicians.

Karolin Krell, Physiotherapist and Osteopath, works in private practice in London and regularly tours with the German National Rowing and Skeleton Team. She explored sleep and rest habits amongst performing artists during her MSc studies and presented her results during the science poster session in Hong Kong. Since completing her MSc she also practices on site at the London Contemporary Dance School and supported various circus and dance companies backstage to keep busy tour schedules rolling. Furthermore, Karolin is very eager and involved in the newly formed UK Osteopathic Performing Arts Care Association (OPACA), an interest group for osteopathic students and osteopaths involved or interested in the health care of performing artists.

Susanna and Karolin both share a passion to support and develop performing arts medicine and enjoyed the conference very much. IADMS strives to enhance the health, well-being, training and performance of dancers by ‘cultivating educational, medical and scientific excellence’. The meeting in Hong Kong proved to be a wonderful opportunity to exchange thoughts and ideas with dance medicine and science experts from all over the world. After four exciting days filled with seminars, poster presentations, movement sessions and social events (and tropical storms!) Susanna and Karolin returned inspired with new ideas for management and treatment approaches within the dance sector. Amongst many things, it was very beneficial to have the opportunity to network and connect with peers. Meeting other delegates from Finland and Sweden allowed Susanna to further develop collaboration between Scandinavian performing arts medicine practitioners. One idea is to arrange a smaller Scandinavian meeting in 2017 as an additional networking opportunity prior to the IADMS 28th meeting, which will be in Helsinki 2018.

Susanna and Karolin are very grateful in particular to the British Association of Performing Arts Medicine (BAPAM) and their supervisors that guided them though their studies at the University College London.

Susanna was winner of the BAPAM prize in 2015 for the UCL PAM MSc Research Project.

Both Susanna and Karolin received BAPAM Shipley-Rudge Research & Education Awards to support attendance at research conferences to present their MSc research during 2016. BAPAM is able to offer these awards thanks an annual donation from Dr Mike Shipley and Philip Rudge.

BAPAM Training Day – Brass and Hearing

Wednesday, August 17th, 2016

Our next Performing Arts Medicine Training Day focuses on Hearing and Brass instruments.

Saturday 19 November
9.15am – 4.30pm

National Council For Voluntary Organisations
8 All Saints Street
London, N1 9RL

We’re looking forward to learning from uniquely experienced healthcare practitioners and arts professionals. This is a great chance to share expertise with peers, make connections and grow our performing arts medicine network. BAPAM Performing Arts Medicine Training Days are ideal for people working in healthcare, and all those engaged in wellbeing in the creative arts, who want to develop their skills in this fascinating specialism.

Full price tickets are £120 with discounts available for BAPAM Registered Practitioners, BAPAM Clinicians and Performing Arts Medicine MSc students.

If you prefer not to book online, please call us on 020 7404 5888.

The provisional schedule for this event is below. Timings and titles will be confirmed shortly.

9.15 – 9.45  Registration and Coffee

9.45 – 12.45 Morning session (includes coffee break):

The effect of air pressure in brass players: Dr Alan Watson, Anatomist & Neuroscientist, Cardiff University

Demonstration of brass playing and ergonomic adaptations: Dr Jonathan White, GP & BAPAM Clinician, Birmingham; Owen Wallage, Tuba player & member RAF music services

Tinnitus: Nic Wray, Communications Manager, British Tinnitus Association

Lunch 12.45 – 1.30

1.30 – 4.30 Afternoon session (includes tea break):

Age-related hearing loss: Dr Frances Williams, Consultant Rheumatologist, Musicians and Performing Artists Clinic Leader, St Thomas’ Hospital London & Researcher in Age-related hearing loss, King’s College London.

Data protection: what every practitioner should know: Paul Ticher, Data Protection consultant

Research presentations: Naomi Norton (RNCM PhD recipient): The role of music teachers in health promotion

MSc prizewinners – tbc

Lunch is included in the ticket price.

Prevalence Study: Musculoskeletal Problems in Professional Orchestra Musicians in Scotland

Thursday, July 7th, 2016

Patrice Berque (a BAPAM-registered physiotherapist based in Glasgow) has contributed a paper relating to the prevalence of PRMPs (Playing-Related Musculoskeletal Problems) among professional orchestra musicians in Scotland to the journal Medical Problems of Performing Artists (MPPA).

This study is the first prevalence study among professional musicians in Scotland, and one of very few in the UK. It shows the prevalence rates of PRMPs among the three orchestras that took part in this study.

A poster summarises the main results of this study. This poster will be presented at IFOMPT 2016, the World Congress of Musculoskeletal Physiotherapy on 8th July in Glasgow at the SECC.

The MPIIQM questionnaire, developed and validated prior to this study, is also available for download from Patrice’s webpage and may be used as a screening tool for injury prevention to measure pain prevalence of PRMPs.

BAPAM Shipley-Rudge Research & Education Bursaries 2016

Tuesday, May 10th, 2016

Purpose

BAPAM Shipley-Rudge Awards are designed to facilitate research networks and grow the Performing Arts Medicine knowledge base through enabling practitioners and students associated with BAPAM to attend relevant conferences and meetings, as well as to promote BAPAM and the MSc in Performing Arts Medicine at UCL.

Eligibility

The Scheme is available to BAPAM assessing clinicians, staff, registered practitioners, students enrolled in UCL MSc in Performing Arts Medicine and student members of the BAPAM Student Advocate Scheme. Applicants must be actively involved in research and education initiatives relevant to performer health. Priority is given to applicants who have not received previous support.

Application process and conditions

Grants are awarded towards expenses as follows:

- Conference registration fees
- Travel costs
- Accommodation
- Resource preparation (graphics/printing)

The maximum amount awarded is £400 although exceptional situations may be considered. The exact amount awarded is agreed in advance.

Award recipients are expected to network and highlight BAPAM’s work when attending events, including via social media, promote the link with the UCL Performing Arts Medicine MSc, and to produce a brief report suitable for the BAPAM News blog or Journal.

To apply please contact BAPAM Chief Executive, Dr Deborah Charnock deborah@bapam.org.uk. We’ll send you more detailed guidance about the information we need and the application and decision making process. Decisions are generally made within 10 working days.

Prizes

Two prizes (each £200) are awarded annually to students completing the MSc: one for the highest mark for the research project, and one for the highest mark overall. Where possible, recipients are invited to attend a BAPAM training day to receive the award and deliver a presentation on their MSc research.

An Exploration of Transformational Breathing for Anxiety Management in Professional Voice Users

Friday, March 11th, 2016

Researcher: Dr Philippa Wheble  

Dr Philippa Wheble is a GP, violinist and singer who is studying for an MSc in Performing Arts Medicine at UCL. Her research investigates the effect of Transformational Breathing® (a diaphragmatic breathing technique) on anxiety, perfectionism and performance anxiety.

She is looking for professional singers to take part in her study. If you are interested you will need to be able to attend sessions in London.

Volunteers will be randomly assigned to either; a course of Transformational Breathing® sessions or to a Waiting List group who will be offered treatment at the end of the study.

Participants will be asked to complete questionnaires about anxiety, perfectionism and wellbeing and have blood pressure, heart rate and breathing tests done throughout the study.

All participants will leave the study with the ability to use this breathing technique independently and will receive the findings when the research is complete.

If you would like to know more please contact:

Dr Philippa Wheble
email: Philippa.Wheble.15@ucl.ac.uk

You will be given a detailed information sheet before confirming your participation.

This research has been approved by the UCL Research Ethics Committee.

All data will be collected and stored in accordance with the Data Protection Act 1998.

Researching String Players’ Back Problems

Wednesday, February 24th, 2016

Kári Árnason is a physiotherapist who is currently studying for a Masters in Performing Arts Medicine at University College London. He is conducting a research project investigating the role of a certain muscle (lower trapezius), located between the shoulder blades, that is understood may play a role in neck, shoulder and upper back pain in viola, violin and cello players.

Kári hopes that this study will help to establish stronger rehabilitation methods and prevention measures for neck, shoulder and upper back injuries, which are very common in viola, violin and cello players. He is looking for adult viola, violin and cello players (professional musicians and music students), both with and without a history of neck, shoulder or upper back pain to participate.

If you would like to take part or find out more, please contact Kári directly at kariarna@gmail.com.

Participants will be asked to complete a questionnaire, especially designed to collect information about health-related problems in musicians and to undergo a clinical examination of the neck and shoulder which will utilise non-invasive, risk-free electromyography (EMG) measurements. This will take place in London.

This study has been approved by the UCL Research Ethics Committee

Perfectionism and Performance Anxiety Research Update

Tuesday, December 8th, 2015

Emese Hruska has completed her research project into perfectionism that we shared in June 2013. Research findings have been submitted to the Music Education Research journal. Emese hopes the results will be useful for many musicians and practitioners and we look forward to reading more.

Title: What factors determine perfectionism and performance anxiety in classical musicians?

Abstract

Perfectionism has been found to be both an aetiological and a maintaining factor in musicians’ anxious performances (Kenny, 2011). There is very little focus on musicians in the literature on perfectionism, and no research has been conducted using qualitative methods. To fill this gap, a qualitative study was conducted that explored classically trained musicians’ memorable life experiences regarding their musicianship, to investigate (a) which life experiences add to developing maladaptive perfectionism and music performance anxiety (MPA), (b) how musicians see themselves falling short of their own standards, and (c) what practices they use to help to reduce anxiety and improve their musical practice and performance. Findings from the analysis of fourteen open-ended, semi-structured interviews suggest that parental guidance and expectations determined participants’ coping styles and perfectionist attitudes. Quality of instruction, communications skills and the attitudes of instrumental teachers in music colleges and conductors in professional orchestras had a strong effect on the participants’ musical development, goal setting, anxiety and perfectionism. Auditions were reported to be the most challenging musical situations that caused the highest level and occurrence of MPA, and feedback was needed after taking part in an audition in order to keep general anxiety levels low. Positive factors included the characteristics of good teachers; effective practice behaviours (mental resilience, acceptance, not trying hard, satisfaction, mental and coping skills, and dealing with emotions); and the positive effect of complementary activities (e.g. yoga, mindfulness).

Event Report: PAMA Symposium 2015

Thursday, July 30th, 2015

BAPAM Registered physiotherapist, Patrice Berque, attended and presented at this year’s PAMA (Performing Arts Medicine Association) Symposium in Snowmass, Colorado, for the third time since 2010. BAPAM was pleased to help fund this trip with a Shipley Rudge Research and Education bursary. We are grateful to Patrice for providing this report:  


The conference started with a tribute to Alice Brandfonbrener who passed away last year. Alice was one of the founders of PAMA in the 1980s, along with Richard Lederman and Robert Sataloff. She was also the first editor of the journal devoted to Performing Arts Medicine: Medical Problems of Performing Artists.

For the first time in some years, the keynote lectures of this year’s conference were dealing with voice pathologies and problems of singers. Robert Sataloff, Professor of Otolaryngology, head and neck surgery at Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, and one of the pioneers of PAMA in the 1980s, gave two keynote lectures. The first dealt with common diagnoses and treatments in singers, with emphasis on the physical examination of the voice and larynx, and the issues around laryngitis and its treatment. The second lecture dealt with the aging voice of singers, giving an account of the anatomical and physiological changes affecting the aging vocal apparatus, and the adaptations that need to be considered to maintain performance. This not only involves medical treatment and surgery in some cases, but also intensive retraining (voice therapy) with a multidisciplinary team.

These lectures on the voice were complemented by two wonderful presentations by Matthias Echternach from the Freiburg Institute for Musicians’ Medicine, University of Music, Freiburg, Germany. Working in collaboration with Claudia Spahn from the same Institute, both Matthias and Claudia received the award for the “Richard Lederman Lectures”. Their work was presented by Matthias Echternach. The first lecture dealt with physiological insights for players of wind instruments, and was an observation of the physiology of playing a wind instrument, using endoscopy and real-time functional MRI (fMRI) with images taken at more than 20 frames per second. This technique made it possible to view an “fMRI video” of various wind players (horn, trumpet, clarinet, oboe, flute, recorder) and to observe the physiological processes of the respiratory system with the diaphragm and thoracic cage; and the actions the larynx, vocal folds, tongue, lips and velopharyngeal apparatus to maintain adequate seals and pressure while playing a wind instrument. A DVD of this talk is available on the following website for purchase: http://www.helblingchoral.com.  This DVD could be used as a teaching or retraining tool for wind players, who often have preconceived ideas on how the respiratory system works when playing a wind instrument. The second lecture from Matthias employed the same techniques, but dealt with singers, and showed the physiological mechanisms at play, involving subglottal pressure, the actions of the vocal cords and folds, and the adaptations of the vocal tract to perform different registers while singing. There were marked differences noted between the various registers of singers: baritone, male alto, tenor, soprano.

There were of course many other topics covered during the conference. One afternoon dealt with talks relating to the epidemiology and prevalence of performance-related musculoskeletal disorders (PRMDs) affecting musicians, including: an ongoing systematic review of incidence and prevalence by Christine Guptill, University of Toronto, Canada; my own presentation on the psychometric evaluation of the Musculoskeletal Pain Intensity and Interference Questionnaire for Musicians (MPIIQM), which is now available online as a user guide; the examination of risk factors, i.e. the impact of playing-time on frequency and severity of pain by Judith Robitaille, University of Sherbrooke, Quebec; an account on how to perform good scientific research in terms of the fundamental concepts in research methodology, presented by Ester Chou, University of Athens, Ohio.

Furthermore, research studies on various aspects of biomechanics and neurology were presented: the importance of mental imagery, involving the mirror neuron system (MNS) and the activation of several cortical areas during mental

practice, presented by Serap Bastepe-Gray, Peabody Conservatory, Baltimore; the biomechanics and timing of the left hand during “shifting” in violin performance using motion capture, presented by Peter Visentin, University of Lethbridge, Canada; an EMG study on the influence of different clarinet thumb-rest positions on right thumb loading, presented by Kathryn Young, Louisana State University; an needle EMG and fMRI case study of a pianist, showing that the hyperactivation of the muscles of the left dystonic hand of a piano player correlated with increased cortical activity in the contralateral primary sensorimotor cortex and supplementary motor area, presented by Sang-Hie Lee, University of South Florida.

Several workshops were organised this year, and made it possible for attendees to interact with presenters. These workshops covered techniques and exercises for singing; how to approach and treat performance anxiety; achieving an effortless violin technique; mindfulness to increase focus and concentration; the integration of voice and dance technique for the musical theatre performer; the use of a new technology, i.e. combined wireless EMG and motion capture technology

to record limb positions and movements simultaneously with muscle activity patterns, load and fatigue.

All in all, it was a very good conference, and next year’s conference will be held outside Aspen/Snowmass for the first time.

This may appeal to more Europeans, since the conference will be held in New York from 6-10 July 2016, a short flight away! Submit your abstract before 1st November 2015 if you want to present: http://www.artsmed.org.

Research Investigates Dance Shoes

Tuesday, June 2nd, 2015

Lindsay Wallace, a dancer, physiotherapist and Performing Arts Medicine MSc researcher at University College London, is looking for female dancers (minimum 4 hours dance activity per week) to take part in her project investigating dance footwear. The project aims to help reduce dance injuries and protect dancers.

Female dancers, please fill in this survey.