Posts Tagged ‘medical research’

Perfectionism and Performance Anxiety Research Update

Tuesday, December 8th, 2015

Emese Hruska has completed her research project into perfectionism that we shared in June 2013. Research findings have been submitted to the Music Education Research journal. Emese hopes the results will be useful for many musicians and practitioners and we look forward to reading more.

Title: What factors determine perfectionism and performance anxiety in classical musicians?

Abstract

Perfectionism has been found to be both an aetiological and a maintaining factor in musicians’ anxious performances (Kenny, 2011). There is very little focus on musicians in the literature on perfectionism, and no research has been conducted using qualitative methods. To fill this gap, a qualitative study was conducted that explored classically trained musicians’ memorable life experiences regarding their musicianship, to investigate (a) which life experiences add to developing maladaptive perfectionism and music performance anxiety (MPA), (b) how musicians see themselves falling short of their own standards, and (c) what practices they use to help to reduce anxiety and improve their musical practice and performance. Findings from the analysis of fourteen open-ended, semi-structured interviews suggest that parental guidance and expectations determined participants’ coping styles and perfectionist attitudes. Quality of instruction, communications skills and the attitudes of instrumental teachers in music colleges and conductors in professional orchestras had a strong effect on the participants’ musical development, goal setting, anxiety and perfectionism. Auditions were reported to be the most challenging musical situations that caused the highest level and occurrence of MPA, and feedback was needed after taking part in an audition in order to keep general anxiety levels low. Positive factors included the characteristics of good teachers; effective practice behaviours (mental resilience, acceptance, not trying hard, satisfaction, mental and coping skills, and dealing with emotions); and the positive effect of complementary activities (e.g. yoga, mindfulness).

Event Report: PAMA Symposium 2015

Thursday, July 30th, 2015

BAPAM Registered physiotherapist, Patrice Berque, attended and presented at this year’s PAMA (Performing Arts Medicine Association) Symposium in Snowmass, Colorado, for the third time since 2010. BAPAM was pleased to help fund this trip with a Shipley Rudge Research and Education bursary. We are grateful to Patrice for providing this report:  


The conference started with a tribute to Alice Brandfonbrener who passed away last year. Alice was one of the founders of PAMA in the 1980s, along with Richard Lederman and Robert Sataloff. She was also the first editor of the journal devoted to Performing Arts Medicine: Medical Problems of Performing Artists.

For the first time in some years, the keynote lectures of this year’s conference were dealing with voice pathologies and problems of singers. Robert Sataloff, Professor of Otolaryngology, head and neck surgery at Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, and one of the pioneers of PAMA in the 1980s, gave two keynote lectures. The first dealt with common diagnoses and treatments in singers, with emphasis on the physical examination of the voice and larynx, and the issues around laryngitis and its treatment. The second lecture dealt with the aging voice of singers, giving an account of the anatomical and physiological changes affecting the aging vocal apparatus, and the adaptations that need to be considered to maintain performance. This not only involves medical treatment and surgery in some cases, but also intensive retraining (voice therapy) with a multidisciplinary team.

These lectures on the voice were complemented by two wonderful presentations by Matthias Echternach from the Freiburg Institute for Musicians’ Medicine, University of Music, Freiburg, Germany. Working in collaboration with Claudia Spahn from the same Institute, both Matthias and Claudia received the award for the “Richard Lederman Lectures”. Their work was presented by Matthias Echternach. The first lecture dealt with physiological insights for players of wind instruments, and was an observation of the physiology of playing a wind instrument, using endoscopy and real-time functional MRI (fMRI) with images taken at more than 20 frames per second. This technique made it possible to view an “fMRI video” of various wind players (horn, trumpet, clarinet, oboe, flute, recorder) and to observe the physiological processes of the respiratory system with the diaphragm and thoracic cage; and the actions the larynx, vocal folds, tongue, lips and velopharyngeal apparatus to maintain adequate seals and pressure while playing a wind instrument. A DVD of this talk is available on the following website for purchase: http://www.helblingchoral.com.  This DVD could be used as a teaching or retraining tool for wind players, who often have preconceived ideas on how the respiratory system works when playing a wind instrument. The second lecture from Matthias employed the same techniques, but dealt with singers, and showed the physiological mechanisms at play, involving subglottal pressure, the actions of the vocal cords and folds, and the adaptations of the vocal tract to perform different registers while singing. There were marked differences noted between the various registers of singers: baritone, male alto, tenor, soprano.

There were of course many other topics covered during the conference. One afternoon dealt with talks relating to the epidemiology and prevalence of performance-related musculoskeletal disorders (PRMDs) affecting musicians, including: an ongoing systematic review of incidence and prevalence by Christine Guptill, University of Toronto, Canada; my own presentation on the psychometric evaluation of the Musculoskeletal Pain Intensity and Interference Questionnaire for Musicians (MPIIQM), which is now available online as a user guide; the examination of risk factors, i.e. the impact of playing-time on frequency and severity of pain by Judith Robitaille, University of Sherbrooke, Quebec; an account on how to perform good scientific research in terms of the fundamental concepts in research methodology, presented by Ester Chou, University of Athens, Ohio.

Furthermore, research studies on various aspects of biomechanics and neurology were presented: the importance of mental imagery, involving the mirror neuron system (MNS) and the activation of several cortical areas during mental

practice, presented by Serap Bastepe-Gray, Peabody Conservatory, Baltimore; the biomechanics and timing of the left hand during “shifting” in violin performance using motion capture, presented by Peter Visentin, University of Lethbridge, Canada; an EMG study on the influence of different clarinet thumb-rest positions on right thumb loading, presented by Kathryn Young, Louisana State University; an needle EMG and fMRI case study of a pianist, showing that the hyperactivation of the muscles of the left dystonic hand of a piano player correlated with increased cortical activity in the contralateral primary sensorimotor cortex and supplementary motor area, presented by Sang-Hie Lee, University of South Florida.

Several workshops were organised this year, and made it possible for attendees to interact with presenters. These workshops covered techniques and exercises for singing; how to approach and treat performance anxiety; achieving an effortless violin technique; mindfulness to increase focus and concentration; the integration of voice and dance technique for the musical theatre performer; the use of a new technology, i.e. combined wireless EMG and motion capture technology

to record limb positions and movements simultaneously with muscle activity patterns, load and fatigue.

All in all, it was a very good conference, and next year’s conference will be held outside Aspen/Snowmass for the first time.

This may appeal to more Europeans, since the conference will be held in New York from 6-10 July 2016, a short flight away! Submit your abstract before 1st November 2015 if you want to present: http://www.artsmed.org.

Research Investigates Dance Shoes

Tuesday, June 2nd, 2015

Lindsay Wallace, a dancer, physiotherapist and Performing Arts Medicine MSc researcher at University College London, is looking for female dancers (minimum 4 hours dance activity per week) to take part in her project investigating dance footwear. The project aims to help reduce dance injuries and protect dancers.

Female dancers, please fill in this survey.

Performing Health Psychology Event

Wednesday, May 20th, 2015

Raluca Matei and Dr Benjamin Gardner have sent us the following information about their interesting research into health psychology in professional orchestral musicians. Read on to find out more, and if you’d be interested in taking part, please contact Raluca Matei directly at raluca.matei@hotmail.com

Tutti for health and wellbeing

If you are a professional orchestral player and want to:

  • sostenuto your health and wellbeing or
  • glissando from being controlled by your health to controlling it yourself (more like you control your instrumental technique) or
  • piu forte on how to implement behaviour change and maintain it through tricks that could become self-sustainable or
  • resonate just like your instrument through forming healthy habits and a wellbeing ostinato…

… then you are invited to attend a free interactive workshop supported by the British Psychological Society (which awarded this proposal the Public Engagement Grant 2015). This is an innovative approach to musicians’ health through the lenses of health psychology in general and behaviour change in particular.

What is health psychology? It is an emerging field aimed at the scientific study of the psychological processes that are relevant for the understanding of aspects such as how health can be promoted and maintained, and how illnesses can be treated and prevented in the first place.

What does behaviour change refer to? In this case, it is meant as an array of evidence-based tools by which one can initiate and maintain change in one’s lifestyle and health-related behaviours.

As psychologists, we need your input and feedback on how to tailor existing evidence to your needs so that together, we attach meaning to this inter-disciplinary collaboration.

This event complements the ongoing work of BAPAM and partner organisations providing specialist health support  to performing arts professionals as well as with the development of the health resources offered by BAPAM in order to sustain both musicians’ wellbeing and high quality music making.

Tempo: A comfortable one/walking pace

Key signature: Health and Wellbeing

Main theme: Prevention with motifs of Lifestyle and Behaviour Change

Performers: Raluca Matei and Dr. Ben Gardner in spoken duet with you

Date and venue: TBC according to expressed interest

Raluca Matei is currently an AHRC-funded PhD student at the Royal Northern College of Music, focusing on health promotion among musicians. She has a background in health psychology and music (has studied violin with Maxim Vengerov at the Menuhin Academy in Switzerland).

Dr. Benjamin Gardner is a Senior Lecturer in Psychology at King’s College London. His expertise is in habit formation as applied to initiating and maintaining behaviour change. As a research psychologist, he is also interested in health promotion in general.

If you are interested in taking part, please email Raluca Mateiraluca.matei@hotmail.com

Research into Sleep Disturbances amongst Performing Artists

Wednesday, April 1st, 2015

Karolin Krell, an osteopath and University College London MSc Student in Performing Arts Medicine, is inviting performing artists to take part in her research study into sleep disturbances in our industry.

Karolin’s research explores the relationship between performance practise and lifestyle issues, particularly sleep and rest habits in the performing arts community.

Information gathered from this research will be used to inform the development of performers’ education and training curriculums. Data could potentially be used to develop advice on rest and recovery times for various performer groups with the aim of helping them to reach their performance potential.

If you wish to take part, please complete the following anonymous survey which collects information regarding your performance, lifestyle and sleep habits. All data requested from you is included on the questionnaire; after completion you have no further obligations to this project. Please read the Participant Information Sheet for further details.

Click here to complete the Sleep Disturbances amongst Performing Artists Survey

The survey link will be closed at the end of May 2015. You can complete and submit the questionnaire at any time before the end of May but please do it as soon as possible.

We’ll share an update about the results of the study in future here and through our Newsletter which you can sign up to by entering your email address here and clicking send:

If you would like to receive medical advice on any of the issues raised in the questionnaire you should contact your GP or call the BAPAM Helpline (020 7404 8444) for further information.

This project has Research Ethics Committee approval from University College London.

Event Report: ASPAH 2014 Symposium

Friday, March 6th, 2015

Tommi Sliiden, osteopath and a graduate of UCL’s MSc in Performing Arts Medicine, attended the November 2014 Symposium of the Australian Society for Performing Arts Healthcare, to present research into breathing in musical theatre performers. We were pleased to help facilitate this through a BAPAM Research and Education Bursary.

Tommi’s report follows: 

ASPAH 2014 Symposium

Tommi Sliiden M.Sc PAM, B.Ost

The theme of this years ASPAH symposium was The complete performer: Turning evidence into practice, with the focus on research and knowledge that could immediately be integrated and translated into clinical, studio or organisational practice. Participants and speakers included performers, teachers, practitioners and researchers from Australia, Malaysia, Canada, and UK.

Opening

Dr Cliffton Chan and Dr Paul Duff welcomed all participants and officially thanked the indigenous Australians for allowing the borrowing of their land, upon which the University had been built. They were further delighted with the range of this years speakers and the increasing development of research into and practice of Performing Arts Medicine specifically – rather than just “adapted sports medicine”.

Keynote speech

The Central Nervous System as a limiting factor to performance and recovery from injury, by Victor Popov, one of Australia’s leading Sports Physiotherapists with a long experience of and interest in Performing Arts medicine. He pointed out the importance of considering the complex and non-linear role of the CNS in order to achieve successful training or treatments, rather than just focusing on mechanical repair and symptomatic relief.

The performance is an expression of skill that is in turn a highly refined motor pattern.  If proprioception is dysfunctional, the execution will be dysfunctional. Poorly co-ordinated contraction and muscle tone pattern easily leads to overuse injury. It is therefore important to appropriately engage CNS in training and treatment – sometimes musculoskeletal injury is related to CNS ‘overload’. By modulating the input to CNS, the output will be changed.

Presentation, 20 min

The Vocal athlete: An introduction to the Estill Method, by Gerald Marko, an Austrian born, Melbourne based singer, musician, lecturer, researcher and Certified Master Teacher of the Estill Method and Course Instructor with testing privileges (the highest of their teaching qualifications). His interest in Estill voice training grew early in his singing career, while performing in musicals in Europe, often expected to sing in a vast range of styles, and through his frustration of his own limited level of knowledge but more so, the lack of helpful coaching and teaching. Coaching rarely included clear, objective instructions with reference to various anatomical structures and muscular activity but often focused on achieving subjective feelings and sensations through, many times vague or nonsensical instructions and imagery that was difficult to interpret, such as the advice he once had been given: “Think yellow!”.

The Estill Method uses research based knowledge of anatomy and vocal physiology and focuses on the ability to safely produce various types of sounds and voice qualities by learning to control the specific structures in the vocal mechanism. It includes a series of exercises specifically designed to individually move any of the thirteen identified involved structures, is used to enable reproduction of any of the six arbitrary voice qualities (speech, falsetto, sob, twang, belting, opera) and variations of them.

Care is taken to develop kinaesthetic feedback and to recognise, locate and control the level of effort to enable safe work.

Though the so called “power, source, filter model” for voice production is used (airflow creating power; vibrating vocal folds as the source of sound waves; vocal tract (area from vocal folds to lips) as filter for further shaping and colouring of the tiny sound produced by vocal folds), more focus is put on the control of vocal folds and vocal tract and their interaction, with less focus on breathing.

The Estill Method puts more emphasis on the craft of control of vocal mechanism, rather than “artistry and performance magic”, and makes no subjective judgments such what voice is “pretty” etc. The method is used to help to reproduce any required sound safely and thus useful for any style of music, and can be useful for both singing and voice therapy.

This short presentation acted as an introduction to the afternoon workshop.

Free papers, 10 min each

(I chose to attend the first four)

The relationship between dancer perceptions of dance floor properties, dance floor force reduction and in situ vertical deformation, by Dr Luke Hopper at the Western Australian Academy of Performing Arts, a Sports scientist specialising in clinical biomechanics including 3D motion capture. This study included comparisons of 15 dancers’ perception of how “sprung” four different floor samples were, compared to the vertical deformation carefully measured by specialised cameras. Their study showed that the dancers, as a group, demonstrated the ability to differentiate small variations in floor mechanical properties (0.5-1.5 mm), something that could be used as an assessment method of dance floors, rather than expensive testing equipment. However; an individual dancer’s perception would on its own not provide a statistically relevant accurate representation.

Comments from the dancers also included that some floors could be perceived as “too soft” and working on a harder floor could be seen, by them, as “safer”, as they would know what to expect, and could better rely on their own skilled dance technique to adapt.

Feeling the sound: Finger proprioception in violin pedagogy, by Dr Marina Robinson, a violinist and lecturer in violin at the Sydney Conservatorium of Music, with added personal experience within this field from having to rehabilitate and retrain following an earlier, serious injury. Her ongoing studies in this field investigate how proprioceptive training and cross-disciplinary learning can enhance violin pedagogy. Testing 24 elite violinists’ proprioceptive acuity showed that there were no overall differences between either hand for their chosen specific tests, indicating that, in spite of the difference in tasks, there are significant proprioceptive demands for both left and right hands. She also talked about how proprioception responds to specific training, is correlated with performance acuity and improves with increased age and experience.

Behind ten equally strong fingers, by Dr Therese Milanovic, a Brisbane based pianist and educator with 11 years experience of learning and teaching the Taubman Approach. She gave insight into causes behind the experience of weak fingers, and the importance of considering the synchronisation between fingers, hand, arm, and even the posture of the rest of the body. She talked about how she uses demonstrations, video examples and step-by-step checklists, to address problems rather than, as often happens in teaching, merely pointing out what not to do, or using independent exercises and monotonous drills in repetitive patterns.

The benefits of ergonomically scaled piano keyboard for smaller handed pianists: Leveling the playing field, by Erica Booker, a Sydney pianist and Suzuki piano teacher trainer, presented her ongoing research in muscular effort and functional load (and the risk of performance injuries). So far, ten pianists, aged up to 14 years, have had their forearm flexor and extensor muscles tested using electromyography whilst playing on a ergonomically scaled piano keyboard (5.5 inch octave) and again on regular full sized model (6.5 inch octave).

The current piano keyboard was standardised in the 1880s, based on what suited male virtuosos at the time, such as Liszt, and research has shown that a small hand span is a risk factor for injuries and that it is affecting females, with often smaller hands than men, disproportionately.

A case of facial peripheral neuropathy in a flautist, by David Peterson, physiotherapist for, among others, Sydney Symphony Orchestra. David discussed a recent case study of a single flautist and the specific patient-centered management approach and outcome.

Health promotion in a sample of elite tertiary student-musicians, by Michael Ingle, a Sydney physiotherapist and trombonist. A study that evaluated the effectiveness of a web-based health promotion course (Sound Performers), in a group of elite musicians at the Australian National Academy of Music.

Findings from the Student Musician Health Survey at Universiti Pendidikan Sultan Idris, Malaysia, by Dr Dr Karen Lonsdale, a music graduate with a doctorate involving research in injury prevention and management of flautists. The results of their online, self-reporting survey that attracted 98 full-time undergraduates and post graduates, were consistent with previous studies on musicians health; 29% were currently suffering from playing-related pain, 47% had experienced it at some time, and 57% felt they had not received enough information or advice on playing-related health during their current studies.

Playing-related pain in bowed string students: Preliminary results, by Judith Robitaille, a violinist and Occupational therapist in Québec. Judith presented results from their prospective cohort study of 152 young string students at three different summer camps.  Using questionnaires distributed few week before the camp and again one week into the camp, they inquired about playing habits, playing-related pain and its impact, and found that playing time had increased from 16 hours/week before the camp, to 33 hours/week during the camp, and found the prevalence of playing related musculoskeletal pain being as high as 96%.

Paper Streams, 25 min

Actors health and wellbeing in Australia: Further analysis of 2013 Actors Survey, by Prof Ian Maxwell, Dr Marianna Szab and Dr Mark Seton, all from University of Sydney. Presentation of results from the Equity (Australia) on-line survey 2013, with 782 respondents, that had gathered information of actors’ professional experiences including training, and income from both acting and non-acting sources as well as aspects of health and wellbeing using validated instruments measuring depression, anxiety, eating disorders, alcohol and drug use.

Elite Australian singer – Career stories, by Kathleen Connell, Sydney-based vocal coach, researcher and singer.  Using questionnaires and interviews of a cross section of singers with active careers between 1985-2005 and using established career theoretical concepts from other fields of work, she had investigated singers’ career maintenance and planning, especially in the latter stages of a career with their transition into other areas and potential changes to identity. Further study looked at how entrepreneurial methods, and the identification of a variety of capabilities, can help plan and sustain a career as well as a transition into other fields or professions.

An evaluation of the breathing strategies and maximum phonation time in musical theatre performer during controlled performance tasks, by Tommi Sliiden. The first research of it’s kind, testing 20 professional West End musical performers’ ability to sing long, sustained notes and how that ability is affected by the increased heart rate and effort of dancing; measuring changes to breathing pattern and heart rates whilst repeating (at a performance-like intensity) a chosen 3 minute extract from a musical number taken from their respective show in three different ways: singing only (standing still); dancing only (in silence); and combined, simultaneous singing and dancing (as in show).

Results showed that maximum phonation time was on average reduced to a third, and heart rate nearly doubled, immediately after fully singing and dancing the number. Lung volume per breath remained the same during dancing only, as during singing only (only breathing rate was increased – to the double). Singing restricted the spontaneous breathing used during dancing only, resulting in a reduction of air usage per minute (by 16%) when combining the two.

A questionnaire showed that only 45% of our performers had felt able to combine these two tasks, to their full potential, by opening night.

Workshops, 1h 40 min each

(I chose to attend the last one)

Posture, balance, symmetry and flow, with Victor Popov. With reference to his earlier speech, he elaborated on practical techniques for improvement of the Central Nervous System parameters of posture, balance symmetry and flow, functional posture training, awareness exercises, pain management and how ‘flow’ can be taught to enhance both expression and rehabilitation.

Optimising music performance: a systematic approach to dynamic postural analysis, with Dr Bronwen Ackermann, physiotherapist, researcher and educator. By using a template previously tested and clinically applied successfully to the Australian Youth Orchestra, a framework was provided to evaluate the posture of musicians with their instruments, in a more static position as well as during performance.

Introduction to muscular voice training – Pushing breath is what’s hurting you, with Gerald Marko. Following the presentation earlier in the day, Gerald demonstrated with great enthusiasm and knowledge the different voice qualities used within the Estill Method (speech, falsetto, sob, twang, belting, opera). He used his own impressive vocal skills to illustrate the various sounds and how they can be varied with subtle, controlled changes to various structures and muscles involved in voice production. Video laryngoscopic images of the larynx and vocal folds highlighted some differences seen when producing different voice qualities. We had a demonstration of Voiceprint™ software, a real-time spectral analysis program that records, analyses, and plays back the voice, giving audiovisual feedback about pitch and voice quality, used to enhance the learning and rehabilitation process.

He further explained the basic mechanics of breathing, the involvement of both active and more passive structures – including muscular control and elastic rib recoil, and how the different voice qualities naturally utilise different amounts of air and produce different levels of loudness, pointing out that production of loud volume is not necessarily a result of increased air volume or pressure, and furthermore, how excessive use of abdominal and other respiratory muscles to increase pressure can even be damaging to the larynx, depending on what voice quality and larynx position is used.

Breathing, especially when no sound production is used, often comes naturally, involving various automatic processes, and the Estill method focuses more on the ability to control the larynx and vocal tract, rather than breath control, something that is often emphasised rather more within other types of vocal training. Gerald used the analogue of sailing to explain – breath does indeed provides the power of voice production, like the wind does for sailing, but it is the ability to control the boat and sails to successfully and safely adapt to the wind that is important, not trying to change the wind – “Thus, it’s called sailing – not winding ”.

Closing

Dr Cliffton Chan and Dr Paul Duff thanked all participants and speakers for a successful and interesting day, and presented ASPAHs Career Development Award as well as the award for the winning contribution to this years online competition to create a YouTube clip promoting this year’s symposium!

Post-Symposium

The Symposium was highly inspiring, with a lot of varied speakers within different fields and interesting participants from different backgrounds to discuss the topics and other work related matters; comparing similarities and differences.

During the week that followed the symposium, I had the opportunity to get in contact with some of the other participants and speakers, including Dr Cliffton Chan, 2014 Symposium Chair, and his colleague, the Principal Physiotherapist at Potts Point Physiotherapy, David Peterson, who invited me to the Sydney Opera House to learn more about treating members of the Australian Opera and Ballet Orchestra.

As a final treat, I managed to get a ticket for the Sydney Symphony Orchestra’s concert, “Symphonic Firsts”, performing Brahms’ Piano Concerto No.1 and Mahler’s Symphony No.1 in the magnificent main hall of the Opera House, with the final piece performed by over 120 musicians in the orchestra! A spectacular evening finished off outside on the terrace overlooking the Harbour Bridge, enjoying a glass of Australian wine in the balmy summer evening.

Project Breakalign

Tuesday, February 10th, 2015

Project Breakalign was founded by Nefeli Tsiouti in 2013 to prevent injuries for breakers/dancers. The research team of dance and medical specialists is committed to creating a methodology of corrective exercises which will reduce the risk of injuries for breakers.

‘This is the first university research of Dance Medicine on bboys/bgirls in the UK, conducted by bboys and bgirls, with the aim to create accessible and accurate knowledge for the hip-hop community. The research will involve bboys and bgirls who are active in the hip-hop scene as the core team, as well as researchers, physiotherapists, coaches, [and] medical specialists’. 

A Kickstarter campaign has been set up to help expand their research programme.

Project Breakalign is working in association with Dance UK, and has ethical approval from University College London.

Collaborative Working : BVA Study Day

Monday, December 1st, 2014

Collaborative Working - flyer

 

Sunday, 25th January, 2015. Baden Powell House, Queen’s Gate, London. SW7 5JS

This study day, organised by the British Voice Association, looks at the value of collaborative working between professions. It is suitable for all those working in the field of voice.

Working Psychologically with Voice (10am – 1pm)
Peter Butcher B.A.(Hons), M.Psychol: Clinical Psychologist – Specialist in CBT
Annie Elias, MRCSLT: Speech and Language Therapist – Specialist in Voice

This session explores the value of collaborative working between clinical psychology and speech and language therapy in helping to understand and free the voice from underlying psychological stresses. The session will include:

  • Cognitive Behaviour Therapy – a brief summary
  • Psychogenic Voice Disorder – what it means
  • The value of CBT in Voice Therapy
  • A model for joint working
  • Practical tips, case study and role play illustration of using CBT to help treat voice disorders, including with singers.

Whose Body Is It Anyway?

Sally Burgess, ARCM, FRCM, Mezzo, Teacher, Mentor, Director.
Fiona Bryan GGSM.Dip RAM.MSTAT, Musician, Alexander Teacher, Arranger, Artist

Sally Burgess (Singing Teacher) and Fiona Bryan (Alexander Teacher) began working together by chance 4 years ago. Although from very different backgrounds they discovered a common interest underpinning their teaching techniques – the importance and potential of mind-body awareness.

They decided to explore this more deeply via a series of workshops for singers combining their respective areas of expertise and were subsequently asked by “Live Music Now” to work with groups of wind and string players.

They are delighted to have this opportunity to share their experiences with you. They will describe in detail their collaborative teaching methods and put them into action with the aid of some (brave) singing volunteers.

Adobe Acrobat - icon Download a provisional Programme

Adobe Acrobat - icon Download a Flyer

Adobe Acrobat - icon Download an Application form

Activity and Feedback – January to June 2014

Thursday, October 9th, 2014

BAPAM is committed to excellence in providing care for performing arts professionals and students. Effective monitoring and feedback is vital to the delivery of our services. Our clinical activity also enables our development as a research hub in performing arts health and practice. Service data for the first 6 months of 2014 is now published.

The full report is available to read and download here.

The information has been compiled from 2 main sources:

1. BAPAM patient registration database demographic and appointments data.

2. Anonymous patient feedback (using Survey Monkey web surveys) collected from new patients attending their first free assessment at a BAPAM clinic.

Additional anonymous feedback information collected from our follow-up survey is also summarised.

Newsletter August 2014

Wednesday, August 13th, 2014

The current BAPAM Newsletter (August 2014)  is now available to read or download in pdf format: BAPAM Newsletter August 2014

Contents:

BAPAM Journal

Pegasus Chamber Choir Fundraising Concert for BAPAM –  For the Fallen

BAPAM Training Day – What is Music Performance 

Clinics News

Musicians’ Dystonia Reseach at UCL Institute of Neurology

BAPAM Scotland Update

PRS for Music Members Benevolent Fund Support

New Patrons

New Staff

Fundraisers

Friends Scheme