Posts Tagged ‘Medicine’

Occupational Health in the Performing Arts Industry: The Original Gig Economy

Tuesday, February 5th, 2019

 

Wednesday 27th March 
Royal Society of Medicine
London

 

Registration for this event is now open.

Training arts professionals in healthy practice skills is vital, but we believe that healthy individuals also require systematic support from the industry that is built on their work. 

The majority of workers in the performing arts are freelancers and all are likely to, at some point in their career, experience an injury or have other health problems as a result of their work. The particular needs of those in this industry translate to other areas of the national workforce where, with the expansion of the ‘gig-economy’, traditional occupational health provision increasingly may not reach. 

The Occupational Medicine Section of the Royal Society of Medicine and the British Association for Performing Arts Medicine have therefore come together to run a one day educational meeting that will be of interest to a wide range of people with an interest in health and work.

Talks and panels feature leading arts industry and occupational health experts, academics and clinicians, and include consideration of the economic case for investing in health, health promotion, injury prevention and rehabilitation for self-employed workers, key and emerging occupational health issues in the arts sector.

Contributors include:

Professor Aaron Williamon, Royal College of Music, Centre for Performance Science

Zeb Soanes, BBC Radio 4 presenter

Jane Dyball, CEO of Music Publishers Association Group, winner of Music Week Women in Music Award for Outstanding Contribution

Professor Emma Redding, Head of Dance Science, Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music and Dance

Colin Thomas, Chief Medical Officer, BBC

Colonel John Etherington, Director of Defence Rehabilitation and Consultant in Rheumatology and Rehabilitation, Defence Medical Rehabilitation Centre

More information and registration

Clinical Governance Toolkit

Tuesday, February 5th, 2019

Can BAPAM help your organisation ensure quality of clinical services for performing artists?

Performing arts organisations and businesses which commission or provide health services for artists, or are considering doing so, should comply with quality standards for healthcare to ensure the best service for beneficiaries, use resources effectively and help to manage any liabilities if things should go wrong.

We have just published a new Clinical Governance Toolkit which is available as a free resource.

BAPAM is a clinically led organisation working in the performing arts sector. We have a clinical governance framework in place and are registered with the Care Quality Commission (CQC).

We are available to:

Discuss quality issues in relation to an existing or planned service

Develop policy documents and reporting systems that allow you to continually monitor the quality of service delivery

Support the scrutiny of your service

We spoke to Dr Penny Wright, BAPAM Honorary Medical Director, to help demystify the topic of clinical governance.

Why is clinical governance important?

It’s a way of guaranteeing the quality of clinical services for patients: I think it’s most important to look at clinical governance from the patient’s point of view in the first instance. Patients often feel vulnerable when coming through the door, so they need to know they’re getting a service that is expert, that is going to come up with the right answer to their problem, backed up by evidence, in an environment which is caring and respectful of them, and where any risk is minimised. From the point of view of those us who are delivering those clinical services, the doctors and other clinicians and the organisations that they work for, making sure that services are of a high quality is also important: if we provide services that are either not of a good quality or not the right services, the ones our patients need, we’re risking the patient getting poor care and we’re risking wasting money and time. There are assumptions that because healthcare practitioners like doctors and nurses are caring and expertly trained, we always provide a good service, but we don’t actually know that (or even know what a ‘good service’ is) if we don’t monitor it and ask questions about how it could be better. Sometimes asking clinical governance questions can be very unpopular! But in the end, asking how we clinicians know that we are doing the right things – and whether we could do better – is in everybody’s best interests.

What does it mean for Performing Arts Medicine providers?

Providers such as BAPAM need to make sure that the service they’re providing is actually effective at treating performers, as they obviously have very special needs and issues. For example, there’s no point in providing performers with physiotherapy advice geared towards sedentary office workers. For care to be effective, providers first need to look at the quality and expertise of the people delivering it: the clinicians that you work with need to be well trained and they need to understand performers in order to provide all the right advice. It’s also about using an evidence base: if you provide a particular form of treatment to a performer, how do you know that it’s the right treatment, that it’s going to help? Underpinning everything has to be this constant questioning, which is ‘how do we know what is the best thing to do for this patient?’ So the evidence base I would say is part of clinical governance. In addition, for whoever is funding the service, “clinical effectiveness is cost effectiveness”, a treatment which works is also likely to be worth the money that it costs.

What does clinical governance mean for patients?

It provides reassurance that the care they’re getting is the right care for them; that it’s delivered in a way which is respectful and professional; and by people who have been appropriately trained. So in a way it is all about standards and, for performers, it’s about receiving career-specific care which is relevant for them in an environment where they feel more understood than they might do in the busy NHS, or in non-specialist freelance or private services.

How can an individual practitioners ensure clinical expertise when working with performers?

I think it’s a combination of training and experience. From the point of view of training, it doesn’t just mean going to conferences and training days, reading journals and things like that, it’s also about networking with specialists in the field and asking advice and learning from them. At BAPAM clinics, our clinicians are always happy to have colleagues sitting in with them. In Performing Arts Medicine in the UK, formal learning opportunities are currently limited but they are out there: there are courses and training days such as those we run at BAPAM, and there are a limited number of specialist journals, or relevant articles in general journals. There are also academic courses that people can go on, like the Performing Arts Medicine MSc at UCL. However, if you’ve got good basic clinical skills in your own area of practice you will also learn simply from seeing lots of performing arts patients: for instance you will learn about problems affecting clarinettists if you see a lot of clarinettists (with their instruments if necessary) and you’ve got the basic skills to ask the right questions about what’s happened to them and why.

Download the BAPAM Clinical Governance Toolkit

New BAPAM Clinics

Tuesday, February 5th, 2019

We now hold free Performing Arts Medicine clinics in London, Glasgow, Birmingham, Cardiff and Leeds. 

If you make a proportion of your living from, or study in the performing arts, and have a health problem related to your work, we can help you.

Our clinicians are experienced at dealing with the problems performing arts workers frequently face, and can help with an accurate diagnosis and advice including identifying efficient care pathways, both in the NHS and from other specialist individuals and services. The BAPAM team can also advise about the availability of financial support for people experiencing health problems affecting their ability to work or study.

To make an appointment, give us a call on 020 7404 8444.

January 2019 Newsletter

Tuesday, February 5th, 2019

Our January 2019 Performing Arts Medicine Newsletter is archived here

Contents:

New clinics

Healthy practice training for performing arts professionals and students

BAPAM and the Royal Society of Medicine Event: Occupational Health in the Performing Arts Industry: The Original Gig Economy

Trustee recruitment

Clinical Governance Toolkit

Free webinar series from BAPAM and ISM

Resources for healthy pianists

Performing Arts Medicine (PAM) day

Tuesday, November 27th, 2018

It’s been a busy year for all things Performing Arts Medicine (PAM). Here’s a look back at one of the highlights of the year.

The annual PAM DAY 2018 was held at the Institute of Sport, Exercise and Health on 21st July and organised by the Department of Performing Arts Medicine at UCL. It was a chance for health professionals, stage performers, and students and staff in health sciences and academics to get acquainted with this area. The idea is that they learn about clinical assessments, recovery and rehabilitation specific to performers in music and dance, as well as performer health education and injury prevention.

Programme lead of the Msc at UCL is musckuloskeletal doctor Dr Hara Trouli, who’s also one of BAPAM’s assessing clinicians. Here she is talking about how the day went.

“PAM day was a successful event for BAPAM practitioners and all clinicians and performers who attended. A range of presentations in music and dance with two streams running all day gave attendees the opportunity to learn a variety of topics, to meet MSc graduates and tutors and to hear about their research projects. PAM DAY received great feedback and we are pleased to see the growing interest and participation in these events.”

The Performing Arts Medicine MSc at UCL is a unique programme providing specialised training to those interested or already involved in offering health services to this very special sector of instrumental musicians, singers, dancers, actors and other performing artists.

Applications for the next academic year in September 2019 is open and closes on 26th July 2019. Click here to find out more

Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra are recruiting an Orchestra Doctor

Monday, July 9th, 2018

The Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra is looking for a local GP to become one of the Orchestra’s Doctors. The GP will ideally be interested in music. This is an interesting voluntary role which will consist of giving a few hours each month in return for concert tickets where possible.

The successful Doctor will become a member of AMABO (Association of Medical Advisors to British Orchestras) and BAPAM (British Association of Performing Arts Medicine) which will involve one or two training days per year.

As one of the Orchestra’s Doctors you will be expected to come into rehearsals every couple of months or more frequently if desired, to meet with orchestra members who wish to discuss any health problems especial those which are performance-related. An interest in Rheumatology and MSK type disorders would be an advantage.

For further information please contact Natalie Wright at the BSO directly:

T: 01202 644704
E: nwright@bsorchestra.co.uk

You can also apply with CV and covering letter to the BSO.

Closing date for application is Monday 23rd July 2018 with interviews being held in Poole towards the end of the summer. Start date will be beginning of October.

The BSO is an equal opportunities employer.

BAPAM Director Appointed

Thursday, December 7th, 2017

We are delighted to welcome our new Director, Claire Cordeaux

Having started her career as a youth and community worker over 30 years ago, Claire Cordeaux has worked in the private and voluntary sectors, social care and the NHS, covering early years and children’s services, workforce development, health strategy, research and innovation at international, regional and local levels. In addition to a language degree, Claire holds a Masters in Research and Postgraduate Diplomas in Public Sector Management and Youth and Community work. Prior to her current role, Claire was Healthcare Director of SIMUL8 Corporation, working globally to improve healthcare using computer modelling and simulation. Claire is an active musician in a Celtic folk fusion band, and has supported a number of arts initiatives and festivals from youth music projects to running a boat stage to connect performers in coastal areas.  Now Director of the British Association for Performing Arts Medicine, Claire counts herself as very lucky to have a role which combines her two passions of health improvement and performing arts.

Healthy Performance Workshops at The Actors Centre

Thursday, September 28th, 2017

We’re pleased to announce a new series of healthy performance workshops in partnership with The Actors Centre, with funding support from Equity.

Members of The Actors Centre can book their place for the first two sessions now.

Look out for more workshops as the series continues through 2018.

Friday 10th November: Finding a Work-Life Balance in Changing Times 

Dr Carol Chapman
Counselling Psychologist and Performance Coach

This 3 hour interactive workshop looks at ways of establishing a viable work-life balance and managing time effectively in the context of irregular jobs and irregular working patterns. These can affect health and well-being and impact on family and social life. The workshop illustrates ways of managing the stress reactions these unpredictable patterns can bring, and shows how to facilitate resilience. Participants will be able to raise appropriate issues that affect them personally and options for coping will be described and discussed. Suggestions for taking ideas further will be made. Book here

Friday 8th December: Healthy Voice

Dr Jenevora Williams
Singing Teacher and Vocal Health Expert

All voice users suffer from ill health at some time. Find out how to minimise the vocal fatigue suffered as a result of overuse or misuse. You can also learn

about the effects of medications, environmental factors, hormones, ageing, and of course – stress.

Dr Jenevora Williams will begin with a brief summary of how the voice works, followed by a practical guide to understanding and managing your own voice use. Book here

International Symposium in Performance Science, Reykjavik

Thursday, September 28th, 2017

The MSc in Performing Arts Medicine and BAPAM were well represented this month at the International Symposium in Performance Science (ISPS) in Reykjavik, Iceland, with research papers by Dr Trish Halliwell, Dr Philippa Whebble, Dr Farrah Jawad, Dr Hara Trouli, osteopath Tommi Sliiden and physiotherapists Kari Arnason, Lindsay Wallace and Krzystoff Dabrowski. Projects on flautists’ injuries, breathing relaxation for singers, vitamin D levels in dancers, health issues of popular musicians, lung function when singing and dancing, muscle injuries in string players, footwear and dancers’ injuries, and palmaris longus in pianists were received with great interest by the conference delegates. It is important to see such a group on the international arena of Performing Arts Medicine and we hope this will encourage more researchers to bring their work to this level. Congratulations to all involved!

Chartered Society of Physiotherapy on Rehabilitation for Musicians

Wednesday, September 13th, 2017

The Chartered Society of Physiotherapy have published an informative article on Rehabilitation for Musicians in their Frontline magazine. Sarah Upjohn – a key clinician in our physiotherapy team in London – and BAPAM registered physiotherapist, Patrice Berque, share their expertise, with contributions from BAPAM and the Musicians’ Union.

Read the article here.