Posts Tagged ‘Medicine’

Research Published into Ballet Dancers’ Experiences of Injury and Osteopathy

Friday, February 24th, 2017

Osteopath, Toby Pollard-Smith, has published his research into Professional ballet dancers’ experience of injury and osteopathic treatment in the UK  in the January 2017 issue of the Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies. BAPAM helped recruit participants for the project, which Toby undertook while training to be an osteopath.

Toby’s previous career as a professional ballet dancer contributed to his interest and expertise in treating dance injuries, and we were recently pleased to welcome him to our Directory of Practitioners. Toby, who is also a keen trumpet player, treats dancers, musicians and other performing artists in Ascot and Marlow. Find Toby Pollard-Smith on the BAPAM Directory.

Research: Vocal Health Awareness in Singing Students and Teachers

Thursday, February 16th, 2017

Dr Anneliese Sayes is a medical doctor and researcher at the Royal College of Music who is investigating the current knowledge levels of vocal anatomy, physiology and pathology in singing students (within the conservatoire and university systems) and singing teachers.

She is inviting participants to fill in a questionnaire (that should take around 10-15 minutes to complete). There is a separate questionnaire for students and teachers. Full information about the study, which has research ethics approval from Conservatoires UK, is also provided. The survey can be accessed online via the following links:

Vocal Awareness questionnaire for student singers

Vocal Awareness questionnaire for singing teachers

Survey: Musical ergonomics in professional UK orchestras

Thursday, February 9th, 2017

Are you a musician working in a professional UK-based orchestra? Could you help us support research into performer healthcare by completing a short anonymous survey on musical ergonomics?

If so, please read the information below before you complete the survey. The survey should take no more than 5 minutes.

Subject: A survey of musicians’ knowledge, access to and use of musical ergonomics in professional UK orchestras.

Hello my name is Teresa Airley, and I would like to invite musicians’ aged 18 years or over, working in professional UK-based orchestras, to participate in a voluntary and anonymous survey on musical ergonomics.  I am undertaking an MSc in performing arts medicine at University College London, and I am interested in learning what motivates musicians to use ergonomic aids.

What are ergonomics? Ergonomics are aids that support musicians within their working environment.  These can be instrument specific adaptations to help reduce playing discomfort, or improve playing posture.  For example chin or thumb rests, or straps to support instrument weight and maintain good posture.  Or, advice on healthy practice such as posture, warm-ups, stretches, and regular breaks.  Environmental ergonomics include appropriate seating, lighting, and hearing protection within performing venues.

Why is this study being done?  Musicians are at risk of developing playing-related injuries.  Education on healthy practice and use of ergonomic aids can help to reduce, or prevent injuries.  My survey explores what motivates musicians to use ergonomic aids, and how knowledge of musical ergonomics is acquired, and what benefits or barriers there are to using ergonomics at work.

Consent: Completing the survey implies consent to participate in this research study, and as participation is anonymous it will not be possible to withdraw your data once you have completed your questionnaire.

How and what data will be collected, and where will it be stored? This survey is anonymous and all information you provide is confidential.   No individuals will be identified in any reports arising from this research.  The survey is available via Opinio and all data gathered is held securely within University College London data centres.  This project has been approved by the UCL Research Ethics Committee.

Contact information: If you would like more information regarding the study please email me direct at teresa.airley.15@ucl.ac.uk Please visit the British Association for Performing Arts Medicine (BAPAM) website at www.bapam.org.uk for further information on specialist health support available to performing artists.  Free specialist medical advice is available from BAPAM.  For enquiries telephone: 020 7404 8444 or email: info@bapam.org.uk

Access the survey here

Thank you for your time.

Solo Pop Singers: How do you feel about your wellbeing in the music industry?

Wednesday, February 1st, 2017

 

Professional singers invited to take part in new research project at the Royal College of Music

Are you a professional solo singer in popular music genres including pop, rock, dance, jazz, blues and folk?

Would you like to help develop our understanding of health and wellbeing experiences in the music industry, and inform future support networks?

Lucinda Heyman, a Performance Science researcher at the Royal College of Music, is looking for professional solo singers, signed to a record label or making a living from singing, to be interviewed for a new project. You don’t need to have experienced a health problem to take part. The research covers positive as well as challenging experiences. You may feel that your work in music has positive effects on your health, for instance.

If you are interested in taking part you can contact Lucinda directly by emailing lucinda.heyman@rcm.ac.uk

She will explain the project and provide you with a detailed participant information sheet.

Any information you provide will remain confidential. The project has Research Ethics Committee approval from Conservatoires UK.

Induction Day: An Introduction to Performer Health and BAPAM’s Work

Friday, January 20th, 2017

London, National Council For Voluntary Organisations
Saturday 22 April

10:00 - 16:00

BAPAM is a specialist medical charity providing performing arts focused clinical advice, free information resources, education and training expertise, supporting research in the field, and working with a growing network of healthcare professionals through our Directory of Practitioners. Our Induction Days provide an informal introduction to this work and are a great opportunity to find out more about BAPAM, network with colleagues and  share insights into performer health issues and support.

Presentations include talks from BAPAM team members, doctors and therapists working in BAPAM clinics, and performing arts professionals who have experienced problems and benefited from our help.

Attendance is free for healthcare practitioners who are joining our clinical team or have been accepted as members of our Directory of Practitioners. We also welcome (for a small fee) other participants including educators, industry members, researchers and performers. Paying attendees who go on to join our Directory or clinical team will have their fee refunded.

Advance booking is essential.

Book your place now.

BAPAM Training Day – Mental Health Perspectives Session 1: Anxiety

Friday, January 20th, 2017

London, National Council For Voluntary Organisations
Saturday, 20 May 2017
09:30 - 17:00

Performing arts mental health has recently been the welcome focus of much attention in the media and throughout the industry, and with increasing numbers of mental health professionals joining our Directory of Practitioners, we’re planning a series of events sharing informed perspectives in this area. We’re starting this programme with our May 20 Training Day focusing on Anxiety. Registration is now open.

BAPAM Training Days are aimed at healthcare practitioners and are a platform for sharing professional expertise and good practice, supporting a network of performing arts medicine professionals. They are also of particular relevance to people working in arts education, employment, welfare, and support. All are welcome but for performers and other groups wishing to learn and share practical skills for healthy, optimal performance, we’ll also be building on our programme of workshop-based sessions though 2017. We’ll keep you up to date on future events.

BAPAM Registered Practitioners who wish to attend should note that they now qualify for the lower ‘BAPAM Authorised’ price bracket.

Our programme includes presentations on:

Diagnosis & Management of Anxiety Disorders

Techniques for anxiety management in performers

Performance Anxiety: research and practice using the Performance Simulator at the Centre for Performance Science, Royal College of Music

Perfectionism: the good, the bad and how CBT can help

Performers’ experiences: interviews and Q and A with performers

Arts Minds Project – Research Findings

Speaker details, full information and tickets available now on the event page - Book Your Place Now

January 2017 Newsletter

Friday, January 20th, 2017

2017 is off to a flying start here at BAPAM, and we already have some great events to share. Our Training Day on May 20 focuses on Anxiety. YCAT’s next Sounding Board event for performers covers health and wellbeing and features BAPAM Trainer, Jane Oakland. On March 17, Graham Fitch gives a performance of Bach’s Goldberg Variations in support of BAPAM. We also have news of our next Induction Day, which is open to all – an introduction to the field of performing arts medicine and a great way to find out more about our work and how you could get involved.

Read our January 2017 Newsletter here.

If you’d like to subscribe to our Newsletter please add your name and email address here. We don’t share your information with anyone else.

 

Goldberg Variations Concert to raise funds for BAPAM

Thursday, December 15th, 2016

An opportunity to hear the complete Goldberg Variations by J S Bach, performed by pianist Graham Fitch

Long regarded as the most serious and ambitious work for keyboard, the Goldberg Variations display Bach’s exceptional knowledge of the many different styles of music of his day, and his own exquisite performing techniques. Originating from a simple idea – a beautiful aria over a repeating bass – the thirty variations present the history of Baroque music in microcosm: lavish displays of fashionable expressive elements of the high Baroque, with just a hint of Classical idealism, together with magnificent structure and formal beauty.

Acclaimed pianist, teacher and writer Graham Fitch has performed the Goldberg Variations on numerous occasions across four continents to rapturous acclaim.

The performance will be followed by a talk and audience discussion/Q&A with the performer, chaired by classical music blogger Frances Wilson (AKA The Cross-Eyed Pianist), which promises to offer fascinating insights into Bach’s wondrous music and the pleasures and challenges of performing it.

Take advantage of this special ticket offer and enjoying priority booking at a discounted price (£14 instead of £18 – limited offer).

BOOK TICKETS

https://billetto.co.uk/en/events/bachs-goldberg-variations-special-offer

Date: Friday 17th March 2017, 7pm Venue: Rosslyn Hill Chapel, Hampstead, London NW3 (just a short walk from Hampstead tube station).

The performance will last approximately 80 minutes. There will be an interval with refreshments before the Q&A session.

All profits from ticket sales will be donated to BAPAM (British Association for Performing Arts Medicine).

Performing Arts Medicine Graduates at IADMS Conference in Hong Kong

Tuesday, November 8th, 2016

We are delighted that two of our Performing Arts Medicine graduates from the University College London Master’s degree in Performing Arts Medicine presented their research results at the International Association for Dance Medicine and Science (IADMS) 26th annual conference at the Hong Kong Academy of Performing Arts.

Susanna Piculell, a Swedish Physiotherapist working in private practice and with the Swedish Volleyball team, undertook research with the Royal Ballet into pre-seasonal screening and injury rates in classical ballet. Since graduating from UCL she has relocated to Sweden and integrated her gained knowledge and skills at Lunds Dans och Musikalgymnasium (a secondary school for dance and musical theatre students), Malmoe Academy of Music and Artists and Musicians health in Malmoe. Experiences from her MSc (including the many observations at the BAPAM clinic) have contributed not only to Susanna’s clinical work but also to new career opportunities. She is now also lecturing on ergonomics and healthy lifestyles for musicians.

Karolin Krell, Physiotherapist and Osteopath, works in private practice in London and regularly tours with the German National Rowing and Skeleton Team. She explored sleep and rest habits amongst performing artists during her MSc studies and presented her results during the science poster session in Hong Kong. Since completing her MSc she also practices on site at the London Contemporary Dance School and supported various circus and dance companies backstage to keep busy tour schedules rolling. Furthermore, Karolin is very eager and involved in the newly formed UK Osteopathic Performing Arts Care Association (OPACA), an interest group for osteopathic students and osteopaths involved or interested in the health care of performing artists.

Susanna and Karolin both share a passion to support and develop performing arts medicine and enjoyed the conference very much. IADMS strives to enhance the health, well-being, training and performance of dancers by ‘cultivating educational, medical and scientific excellence’. The meeting in Hong Kong proved to be a wonderful opportunity to exchange thoughts and ideas with dance medicine and science experts from all over the world. After four exciting days filled with seminars, poster presentations, movement sessions and social events (and tropical storms!) Susanna and Karolin returned inspired with new ideas for management and treatment approaches within the dance sector. Amongst many things, it was very beneficial to have the opportunity to network and connect with peers. Meeting other delegates from Finland and Sweden allowed Susanna to further develop collaboration between Scandinavian performing arts medicine practitioners. One idea is to arrange a smaller Scandinavian meeting in 2017 as an additional networking opportunity prior to the IADMS 28th meeting, which will be in Helsinki 2018.

Susanna and Karolin are very grateful in particular to the British Association of Performing Arts Medicine (BAPAM) and their supervisors that guided them though their studies at the University College London.

Susanna was winner of the BAPAM prize in 2015 for the UCL PAM MSc Research Project.

Both Susanna and Karolin received BAPAM Shipley-Rudge Research & Education Awards to support attendance at research conferences to present their MSc research during 2016. BAPAM is able to offer these awards thanks an annual donation from Dr Mike Shipley and Philip Rudge.

BAPAM Training Day – Brass and Hearing

Wednesday, August 17th, 2016

Our next Performing Arts Medicine Training Day focuses on Hearing and Brass instruments.

Saturday 19 November
9.15am – 4.30pm

National Council For Voluntary Organisations
8 All Saints Street
London, N1 9RL

We’re looking forward to learning from uniquely experienced healthcare practitioners and arts professionals. This is a great chance to share expertise with peers, make connections and grow our performing arts medicine network. BAPAM Performing Arts Medicine Training Days are ideal for people working in healthcare, and all those engaged in wellbeing in the creative arts, who want to develop their skills in this fascinating specialism.

Full price tickets are £120 with discounts available for BAPAM Registered Practitioners, BAPAM Clinicians and Performing Arts Medicine MSc students.

If you prefer not to book online, please call us on 020 7404 5888.

The provisional schedule for this event is below. Timings and titles will be confirmed shortly.

9.15 – 9.45  Registration and Coffee

9.45 – 12.45 Morning session (includes coffee break):

The effect of air pressure in brass players: Dr Alan Watson, Anatomist & Neuroscientist, Cardiff University

Demonstration of brass playing and ergonomic adaptations: Dr Jonathan White, GP & BAPAM Clinician, Birmingham; Owen Wallage, Tuba player & member RAF music services

Tinnitus: Nic Wray, Communications Manager, British Tinnitus Association

Lunch 12.45 – 1.30

1.30 – 4.30 Afternoon session (includes tea break):

Age-related hearing loss: Dr Frances Williams, Consultant Rheumatologist, Musicians and Performing Artists Clinic Leader, St Thomas’ Hospital London & Researcher in Age-related hearing loss, King’s College London.

Data protection: what every practitioner should know: Paul Ticher, Data Protection consultant

Research presentations: Naomi Norton (RNCM PhD recipient): The role of music teachers in health promotion

MSc prizewinners – tbc

Lunch is included in the ticket price.