Posts Tagged ‘Muscles’

Alexander Technique Research Update

Tuesday, July 24th, 2018

If you’re interested in the ergonomics of musicianship then you may remember a previous post where we featured the research of Alison Loram. Alison is a violinist and BAPAM-registered Alexander Technique teacher working with performers. Alison is also a research scientist in the field of musicians health (and biodiversity in domestic gardens), and has published a number of papers.

Exploring the premise that musicians are subject to a wide range of medical and performance-related problems due to physical and psychological demands, Alison’s thesis for her masters in Performing Arts Medicine, which is now published and open access, looked into chronic profession-limiting problems in musicians: Underlying mechanisms and neuroplastic routes to recovery

A related presentation considers the scientific basis of the Alexander Technique, and presents results of experimental research into Alexander teaching methodology: Explaining the Alexander Technique to clinicians and scientists: Psycho-physical re-education – an introduction to cognitive-motor system-level causes of performance-related problems.

Alison Loram Muscle Function Research Published

Friday, March 24th, 2017

Alison Loram is a BAPAM-registered Alexander Technique teacher with expertise in the technique’s application to performance and practice, and ergonomics of instrumental playing/singing. She is a graduate of UCL’s Performing Arts Medicine MSc, violinist and research scientist. Her current research work investigates muscle function and motor control, and strategies of changing habits associated with chronic pain, injury and performance limitation.

The first of the papers directly associated with this research has recently been published, and is open-access. You can read the paper here:

Proactive selective inhibition targeted at the neck muscles: this proximal constraint facilitates learning and regulates global control.

Other articles explaining and verifying the techniques used in the experiments and analysis have also been published. For example, the use of ultrasound imaging to determine the change in neck muscle activity was completely novel and so the method had to be set out, explained and the analyses processes, not just of the data but of the images themselves, had to be documented, peer-reviewed and published.

The technical paper Real-Time Ultrasound Segmentation, Analysis and Visualisation of Deep Cervical Muscle Structure is also open access.