Posts Tagged ‘Music’

‘Composed’ – a Film about Performance Anxiety, Exclusive London Screening

Wednesday, March 15th, 2017

Composed invites you into the world of professional classical music, for an exploration of the many causes of and solutions for performance anxiety.  This feature documentary brings together dozens of professionals from prestigious orchestras, symphonies, and music schools to discuss their personal journeys, and consider how best to achieve excellence in the face of enormous pressure. Composed finally confirms what so many of us have always secretly wondered – no, it’s not just you who has experienced the physical and mental agonies of performance anxiety, and yes, there are many ways to overcome the symptoms and deliver peak auditions and performances.

A special preview screening, followed by a Q&A with director, John Beder, will be held at the 1901 Arts Club, Waterloo, London, on Tuesday 2nd May. Doors open at 6pm and the film will be screened at 7pm.

Book tickets here.

 

 

Frances Wilson is Fundraising for BAPAM

Tuesday, March 14th, 2017

Frances Wilson PhotoWe are very grateful to Frances Wilson, aka music blogger The Cross-Eyed Pianist who, as well as organising Graham Fitch’s sold out performance of the Goldberg Variations in aid of BAPAM, has now set up a fundraising page on Just Giving to help support our work. Here’s why Frances is supporting us:

I and a number of other musician friends and colleagues have benefitted greatly from the expert, specialist services and support offered by BAPAM, including access to physiotherapists and hand specialists, workshops and training days examining issues such as posture, exercise and coping with performance anxiety, and free leaflets and helpsheets via their website.

Please help BAPAM continue its important work supporting musicians and performers by making a donation.

Thank you.

BAPAM make a real difference to musicians and all performers who are overcoming work-related health problems. We enable arts professionals to make informed decisions, access effective care and get back to performing as quickly as possible.

You can make a donation here.

Musician’s Focal Dystonia Presentation by MSc students in Performing Arts Medicine

Friday, March 3rd, 2017

Wednesday 22/03/17 6pm
Royal London Hospital for Integrated Medicine
Please confirm attendance with Nicholas.Straiton@uclh.nhs.uk

Research: Vocal Health Awareness in Singing Students and Teachers

Thursday, February 16th, 2017

Dr Anneliese Sayes is a medical doctor and researcher at the Royal College of Music who is investigating the current knowledge levels of vocal anatomy, physiology and pathology in singing students (within the conservatoire and university systems) and singing teachers.

She is inviting participants to fill in a questionnaire (that should take around 10-15 minutes to complete). There is a separate questionnaire for students and teachers. Full information about the study, which has research ethics approval from Conservatoires UK, is also provided. The survey can be accessed online via the following links:

Vocal Awareness questionnaire for student singers

Vocal Awareness questionnaire for singing teachers

Survey: Musical ergonomics in professional UK orchestras

Thursday, February 9th, 2017

Are you a musician working in a professional UK-based orchestra? Could you help us support research into performer healthcare by completing a short anonymous survey on musical ergonomics?

If so, please read the information below before you complete the survey. The survey should take no more than 5 minutes.

Subject: A survey of musicians’ knowledge, access to and use of musical ergonomics in professional UK orchestras.

Hello my name is Teresa Airley, and I would like to invite musicians’ aged 18 years or over, working in professional UK-based orchestras, to participate in a voluntary and anonymous survey on musical ergonomics.  I am undertaking an MSc in performing arts medicine at University College London, and I am interested in learning what motivates musicians to use ergonomic aids.

What are ergonomics? Ergonomics are aids that support musicians within their working environment.  These can be instrument specific adaptations to help reduce playing discomfort, or improve playing posture.  For example chin or thumb rests, or straps to support instrument weight and maintain good posture.  Or, advice on healthy practice such as posture, warm-ups, stretches, and regular breaks.  Environmental ergonomics include appropriate seating, lighting, and hearing protection within performing venues.

Why is this study being done?  Musicians are at risk of developing playing-related injuries.  Education on healthy practice and use of ergonomic aids can help to reduce, or prevent injuries.  My survey explores what motivates musicians to use ergonomic aids, and how knowledge of musical ergonomics is acquired, and what benefits or barriers there are to using ergonomics at work.

Consent: Completing the survey implies consent to participate in this research study, and as participation is anonymous it will not be possible to withdraw your data once you have completed your questionnaire.

How and what data will be collected, and where will it be stored? This survey is anonymous and all information you provide is confidential.   No individuals will be identified in any reports arising from this research.  The survey is available via Opinio and all data gathered is held securely within University College London data centres.  This project has been approved by the UCL Research Ethics Committee.

Contact information: If you would like more information regarding the study please email me direct at teresa.airley.15@ucl.ac.uk Please visit the British Association for Performing Arts Medicine (BAPAM) website at www.bapam.org.uk for further information on specialist health support available to performing artists.  Free specialist medical advice is available from BAPAM.  For enquiries telephone: 020 7404 8444 or email: info@bapam.org.uk

Access the survey here

Thank you for your time.

Solo Pop Singers: How do you feel about your wellbeing in the music industry?

Wednesday, February 1st, 2017

 

Professional singers invited to take part in new research project at the Royal College of Music

Are you a professional solo singer in popular music genres including pop, rock, dance, jazz, blues and folk?

Would you like to help develop our understanding of health and wellbeing experiences in the music industry, and inform future support networks?

Lucinda Heyman, a Performance Science researcher at the Royal College of Music, is looking for professional solo singers, signed to a record label or making a living from singing, to be interviewed for a new project. You don’t need to have experienced a health problem to take part. The research covers positive as well as challenging experiences. You may feel that your work in music has positive effects on your health, for instance.

If you are interested in taking part you can contact Lucinda directly by emailing lucinda.heyman@rcm.ac.uk

She will explain the project and provide you with a detailed participant information sheet.

Any information you provide will remain confidential. The project has Research Ethics Committee approval from Conservatoires UK.

January 2017 Newsletter

Friday, January 20th, 2017

2017 is off to a flying start here at BAPAM, and we already have some great events to share. Our Training Day on May 20 focuses on Anxiety. YCAT’s next Sounding Board event for performers covers health and wellbeing and features BAPAM Trainer, Jane Oakland. On March 17, Graham Fitch gives a performance of Bach’s Goldberg Variations in support of BAPAM. We also have news of our next Induction Day, which is open to all – an introduction to the field of performing arts medicine and a great way to find out more about our work and how you could get involved.

Read our January 2017 Newsletter here.

If you’d like to subscribe to our Newsletter please add your name and email address here. We don’t share your information with anyone else.

 

YCAT Sounding Board – Health and Wellbeing for Performers

Wednesday, January 11th, 2017

YCAT Sounding Board is the new initiative from the Young Classical Artists Trust (YCAT) to create a leading professional training ground for a broad and diverse range of music graduates and students. YCAT’s fourth career development seminar tackles the vital issue of maintaining your physical and mental wellbeing as a performer. BAPAM trainer, Jane Oakland, a music psychologist and vocal consultant, will be joining the panel to discuss issues around physical and mental wellbeing for those working in performance, and provide techniques to prevent and overcome these issues should they arise. This is a great opportunity to ask questions and discuss the challenges and benefits to all performers in engaging with this essential element of a balanced musical life.

Panel:

Matthew Jones – violist and performance health expert

Jane Oakland – BAPAM registered music psychologist and vocal consultant

Aaron Williamon – Professor of Performance Science, Royal College of Music

Time and Location: Tuesday 24th January – Royal Overseas League, London
Panel discussion: 1 hour
Q&A: 30 mins
Post-seminar: drinks and networking
Cost: £5

All welcome! Tickets are limited. 

Book your tickets here.

 

Musician’s Focal Dystonia Factsheet

Wednesday, November 2nd, 2016

Download our new Musician’s Focal Dystonia Factsheet here.

Dystonia is a neurological condition that causes involuntary muscle spasm leading to abnormal movements. While they are unlikely to encounter this condition, musicians may develop a rare form of task-specific dystonia known as ‘Musician’s Focal Dystonia (MFD)’. Most cases of MFD affect the upper limb (hands, fingers, wrist or forearm) in guitarists, pianists and string players. However, brass or wind players may also experience MFD in the hands and in areas relating to embouchure (mouth, lips, cheeks, jaw or tongue). Percussionists may develop dystonia in the foot.

To meet the need for guidance about Musician’s Focal Dystonia, we have developed our new Factsheet in partnership with the Association for British Orchestras (ABO) and the Musicians’ Union (MU). The Factsheet provides a brief overview of symptoms and possible risk factors, and suggestions for prevention and management plus advice for employers, including orchestra managers, and sources of further advice and support.

This publication was produced in consultation with our Dystonia Advisory Group: Dr Rebecca Whiticar (Chair), Dr Deborah Charnock, Dr David Fielding, Dr Mike Shipley, Dan Hayhurst (BAPAM); Dawn Day (ABO); Diane Widdison (MU); Katherine Butler (Clinical Specialist in Hand Therapy); Dr Mark Edwards (Consultant Neurologist); Mr John White (Upper limb orthopaedic surgeon).

We are extremely pleased to have collaborated with the ABO and BAPAM on producing this guidance which we hope will be useful to both musicians and the engagers of musicians. Although FD is relatively rare we know that being able to access the correct information for diagnosis and pathways to treatments is invaluable to the musicians that are affected. We hope that the guidance, that has had input from the top medical specialists in the field, helps contribute to the increased awareness of FD in musicians - Diane Widdison, Musicians’ Union National Organiser – Education and Training

Download our Musician’s Focal Dystonia Factsheet here.

BAPAM Training Day – Brass and Hearing

Wednesday, August 17th, 2016

Our next Performing Arts Medicine Training Day focuses on Hearing and Brass instruments.

Saturday 19 November
9.15am – 4.30pm

National Council For Voluntary Organisations
8 All Saints Street
London, N1 9RL

We’re looking forward to learning from uniquely experienced healthcare practitioners and arts professionals. This is a great chance to share expertise with peers, make connections and grow our performing arts medicine network. BAPAM Performing Arts Medicine Training Days are ideal for people working in healthcare, and all those engaged in wellbeing in the creative arts, who want to develop their skills in this fascinating specialism.

Full price tickets are £120 with discounts available for BAPAM Registered Practitioners, BAPAM Clinicians and Performing Arts Medicine MSc students.

If you prefer not to book online, please call us on 020 7404 5888.

The provisional schedule for this event is below. Timings and titles will be confirmed shortly.

9.15 – 9.45  Registration and Coffee

9.45 – 12.45 Morning session (includes coffee break):

The effect of air pressure in brass players: Dr Alan Watson, Anatomist & Neuroscientist, Cardiff University

Demonstration of brass playing and ergonomic adaptations: Dr Jonathan White, GP & BAPAM Clinician, Birmingham; Owen Wallage, Tuba player & member RAF music services

Tinnitus: Nic Wray, Communications Manager, British Tinnitus Association

Lunch 12.45 – 1.30

1.30 – 4.30 Afternoon session (includes tea break):

Age-related hearing loss: Dr Frances Williams, Consultant Rheumatologist, Musicians and Performing Artists Clinic Leader, St Thomas’ Hospital London & Researcher in Age-related hearing loss, King’s College London.

Data protection: what every practitioner should know: Paul Ticher, Data Protection consultant

Research presentations: Naomi Norton (RNCM PhD recipient): The role of music teachers in health promotion

MSc prizewinners – tbc

Lunch is included in the ticket price.