Posts Tagged ‘Musicians’

Musician’s Focal Dystonia Presentation by MSc students in Performing Arts Medicine

Friday, March 3rd, 2017

Wednesday 22/03/17 6pm
Royal London Hospital for Integrated Medicine
Please confirm attendance with Nicholas.Straiton@uclh.nhs.uk

Research Published into Ballet Dancers’ Experiences of Injury and Osteopathy

Friday, February 24th, 2017

Osteopath, Toby Pollard-Smith, has published his research into Professional ballet dancers’ experience of injury and osteopathic treatment in the UK  in the January 2017 issue of the Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies. BAPAM helped recruit participants for the project, which Toby undertook while training to be an osteopath.

Toby’s previous career as a professional ballet dancer contributed to his interest and expertise in treating dance injuries, and we were recently pleased to welcome him to our Directory of Practitioners. Toby, who is also a keen trumpet player, treats dancers, musicians and other performing artists in Ascot and Marlow. Find Toby Pollard-Smith on the BAPAM Directory.

Musician’s Focal Dystonia Factsheet

Wednesday, November 2nd, 2016

Download our new Musician’s Focal Dystonia Factsheet here.

Dystonia is a neurological condition that causes involuntary muscle spasm leading to abnormal movements. While they are unlikely to encounter this condition, musicians may develop a rare form of task-specific dystonia known as ‘Musician’s Focal Dystonia (MFD)’. Most cases of MFD affect the upper limb (hands, fingers, wrist or forearm) in guitarists, pianists and string players. However, brass or wind players may also experience MFD in the hands and in areas relating to embouchure (mouth, lips, cheeks, jaw or tongue). Percussionists may develop dystonia in the foot.

To meet the need for guidance about Musician’s Focal Dystonia, we have developed our new Factsheet in partnership with the Association for British Orchestras (ABO) and the Musicians’ Union (MU). The Factsheet provides a brief overview of symptoms and possible risk factors, and suggestions for prevention and management plus advice for employers, including orchestra managers, and sources of further advice and support.

This publication was produced in consultation with our Dystonia Advisory Group: Dr Rebecca Whiticar (Chair), Dr Deborah Charnock, Dr David Fielding, Dr Mike Shipley, Dan Hayhurst (BAPAM); Dawn Day (ABO); Diane Widdison (MU); Katherine Butler (Clinical Specialist in Hand Therapy); Dr Mark Edwards (Consultant Neurologist); Mr John White (Upper limb orthopaedic surgeon).

We are extremely pleased to have collaborated with the ABO and BAPAM on producing this guidance which we hope will be useful to both musicians and the engagers of musicians. Although FD is relatively rare we know that being able to access the correct information for diagnosis and pathways to treatments is invaluable to the musicians that are affected. We hope that the guidance, that has had input from the top medical specialists in the field, helps contribute to the increased awareness of FD in musicians - Diane Widdison, Musicians’ Union National Organiser – Education and Training

Download our Musician’s Focal Dystonia Factsheet here.

Prevalence Study: Musculoskeletal Problems in Professional Orchestra Musicians in Scotland

Thursday, July 7th, 2016

Patrice Berque (a BAPAM-registered physiotherapist based in Glasgow) has contributed a paper relating to the prevalence of PRMPs (Playing-Related Musculoskeletal Problems) among professional orchestra musicians in Scotland to the journal Medical Problems of Performing Artists (MPPA).

This study is the first prevalence study among professional musicians in Scotland, and one of very few in the UK. It shows the prevalence rates of PRMPs among the three orchestras that took part in this study.

A poster summarises the main results of this study. This poster will be presented at IFOMPT 2016, the World Congress of Musculoskeletal Physiotherapy on 8th July in Glasgow at the SECC.

The MPIIQM questionnaire, developed and validated prior to this study, is also available for download from Patrice’s webpage and may be used as a screening tool for injury prevention to measure pain prevalence of PRMPs.

Performing Health Psychology Event

Wednesday, May 20th, 2015

Raluca Matei and Dr Benjamin Gardner have sent us the following information about their interesting research into health psychology in professional orchestral musicians. Read on to find out more, and if you’d be interested in taking part, please contact Raluca Matei directly at raluca.matei@hotmail.com

Tutti for health and wellbeing

If you are a professional orchestral player and want to:

  • sostenuto your health and wellbeing or
  • glissando from being controlled by your health to controlling it yourself (more like you control your instrumental technique) or
  • piu forte on how to implement behaviour change and maintain it through tricks that could become self-sustainable or
  • resonate just like your instrument through forming healthy habits and a wellbeing ostinato…

… then you are invited to attend a free interactive workshop supported by the British Psychological Society (which awarded this proposal the Public Engagement Grant 2015). This is an innovative approach to musicians’ health through the lenses of health psychology in general and behaviour change in particular.

What is health psychology? It is an emerging field aimed at the scientific study of the psychological processes that are relevant for the understanding of aspects such as how health can be promoted and maintained, and how illnesses can be treated and prevented in the first place.

What does behaviour change refer to? In this case, it is meant as an array of evidence-based tools by which one can initiate and maintain change in one’s lifestyle and health-related behaviours.

As psychologists, we need your input and feedback on how to tailor existing evidence to your needs so that together, we attach meaning to this inter-disciplinary collaboration.

This event complements the ongoing work of BAPAM and partner organisations providing specialist health support  to performing arts professionals as well as with the development of the health resources offered by BAPAM in order to sustain both musicians’ wellbeing and high quality music making.

Tempo: A comfortable one/walking pace

Key signature: Health and Wellbeing

Main theme: Prevention with motifs of Lifestyle and Behaviour Change

Performers: Raluca Matei and Dr. Ben Gardner in spoken duet with you

Date and venue: TBC according to expressed interest

Raluca Matei is currently an AHRC-funded PhD student at the Royal Northern College of Music, focusing on health promotion among musicians. She has a background in health psychology and music (has studied violin with Maxim Vengerov at the Menuhin Academy in Switzerland).

Dr. Benjamin Gardner is a Senior Lecturer in Psychology at King’s College London. His expertise is in habit formation as applied to initiating and maintaining behaviour change. As a research psychologist, he is also interested in health promotion in general.

If you are interested in taking part, please email Raluca Mateiraluca.matei@hotmail.com

Royal Society of Musicians Annual Charity Concert

Wednesday, January 28th, 2015

Our friends and supporters, the Royal Society of Musicians, are holding their 20th annual Jacqueline du Pré Charity Concert on March 3rd 2015 at 7.30pm at the Wigmore Hall. Britain’s oldest musical charity, The Royal Society of Musicians have been providing assistance to musicians in need since 1738

Click here for more information and to book your ticket online.

Two of Britain’s finest award-winning string quartets, the Sacconi and Navarra, are joined at the Wigmore Hall by top British cellist, Guy Johnston in a programme of contrasts – the brilliant textures and vibrant colours of Bridge and Ravel and the titanic Classical quintet by Schubert.

The Navarra String Quartet is highly sought-after, with an international reputation, receiving awards such as the MIDEM Classique Young Artist Award and a Borletti-Buitoni Trust Fellowship. They have been described as “one of the most dynamic and poetic string quartets of today”.

Since their formation in 2001, the Sacconi Quartet have rooted a reputation for their seductive style. With their own record label and many critically acclaimed recordings, The Sacconi’s four founding members continue to demonstrate a shared passion for quartet repertoire, bringing a fresh and sparky feel to string playing and reaching out to new audiences worldwide.

Guy Johnston has fast become one of the UK’s finest soloists and chamber musicians. He is a professor at the Royal Academy of Music and patron of many youth charities and organisations. Guy has established himself as not only an inspiration on the cello but a figurehead of music-making in Britain.

All three cellos being performed on at this concert are on long-term loans to the cellists by the Royal Society of Musicians.

Creating Without Conflict

Wednesday, May 7th, 2014

A full report from the Musicians’ Union Creating Without Conflict survey into bullying, harassment and discrimination in the workplace  is now available. The campaign invited contributions from MU, Equity, National Union of Journalists, The Writers’ Guild and BECTU members and key findings include:

56% respondents report being bullied, harassed or discriminated against,

52% respondents have witnessed bullying, harassment or discrimination in the workplace,

More women than men – 64% compared to 39% – have experienced bullying, harassment or discrimination at work,

Freelancers are 14% less likely to report ill treatment at work to a manager,

74% of musicians who responded said abuse came largely from co-workers,

45% of those who were happy with the outcome of their reporting the incident to employers involved their union.

Find out about the recommendations for tackling these issues and read the full report here. 

Music Mark: Playing Related Injuries in Elite Young Instrumental Musicians

Wednesday, February 26th, 2014

Sarah Upjohn, specialist physiotherapist, Doctorate student (the only chartered physiotherapist ever to be offered a place to do a Doctorate at Cambridge, to our knowledge!), and BAPAM Directory member, has written a fascinating article for the UK Association for Music Education, Music Mark.

Sarah’s unique perspective on playing related injuries in elite young instrumental musicians, garnered through her experience working with students at the Purcell School and research she is conducting for her Cambridge University Doctorate enable her to discuss the types of injuries encountered and how they relate to instruments played, clearly identify risk factors for playing related injury and implications for instrumental teachers, and suggest targeted injury prevention strategies.

We see many young musicians in our clinics who have never been given adequate injury prevention advice. In particular, this can lead to serious problems for students entering higher education, with the required increase in playing time, lifestyle changes and other pressures. It’s an issue that Sarah is doing great work to address.

We are very grateful to Sarah and to Music Mark for granting us permission to share the article. It is available here in pdf format: Playing Related Injuries in Elite Young Musicians – a Physiotherapist’s Perspective

This article was originally published in Music Mark’s termly magazine, available to all their members. Music Mark represent and support 99% of all Music Services and over 12,000 instrumental and classroom music teachers, music tutors, assistants plus consultants, advisers, inspectors and lecturers in Initial Teacher Education. See more at: http://www.musicmark.org.uk/who-we-are.

We hope to feature updates on Sarah’s work in future issues of the BAPAM Journal.

 

Research into Musicians’ Dystonia at UCL Institute of Neurology

Monday, January 20th, 2014

The Pathophysiology of Dystonia

Are you a musician with focal dystonia?

A team of researchers at the UCL Institute of Neurology and The National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, led by Dr Mark Edwards, are particularly interested in hearing from musicians with focal (task-specific) dystonia. The aim is to develop methods for assessing the symptoms, and discover information which will be useful in future clinical trials. It is important to note that the study is not, in itself, a clinical trial for treatment of dystonia.

Musicians participating will need to attend multiple sessions at the Institute of Neurology with their instruments (a keyboard can be provided). You would need to able to attend 12 sessions which last one hour or less. The design requires four sessions in four consecutive days which are repeated three times with a gap of a few weeks in between. Travel expenses will be covered and times and dates are generally very flexible.  The study uses transcranial magnetic stimulation within specific safe parameters. It is not invasive, does not involve pain and is generally very well tolerated by participants.

The team hope to establish a specific clinic for this type of dystonia.

If you have this form of dystonia and would like to be seen in clinic or are interested in taking part in studies please email Dr Mark Edwards, Consultant Neurologist, via: m.j.edwards@ucl.ac.uk.

The team will provide full information to anyone interested in taking part.

Research Ethics Committee approval for this study has been granted by the NHS National Research Ethics Service.

Training Event for Music Teachers – Promoting Health and Well-Being in Music Lessons

Wednesday, December 11th, 2013

10.00 – 17.00, Sunday 19th January 2014
Royal Northern College of Music

 

Naomi Norton, BAPAM Student Advocate Scheme Manager and PhD student at the Royal Northern College of Music, would like to invite you to attend a training event to be held at the RNCM on Sunday 19th January 2014.

This event is open to all musicians and other interested parties, although sessions will focus on the music lesson environment and therefore are likely to be most relevant to instrumental and vocal teachers (all ages, instruments and genres).

Attendance at the event costs only £28, with a further £3 discount available to any individuals who have participated in Naomi’s previous research study (available here).

Registration for the event will open at 9.30am and sessions will run from 10.00 – 16.00 on Sunday 19th January 2014; optional focus group discussions will take place following the event from 16.15 – 17.00

To book your place please contact Naomi Norton by email naomi.norton@student.rncm.ac.uk

More information is available via the RNCM Box Office.

The day aims to provide practical information regarding how to avoid or manage performance-related problems and how to pass this information on to instrumental/vocal pupils.

Sessions:

Performance-related problems Drusilla Redman
Health support Deborah Charnock
String Specialist Christine Harrison
Performance Anxiety Carol Chapman
Psycho-Physical Re-Education Alison Loram
Vocal Specialist Ian MacDonald
Wind and Brass Specialist Andrew Roberts
Performance Coaching Karen O’Connor
Focus group sessions Volunteer delegates and speakers

See RNCM Box Office page for speaker biographies

Event Sponsors: The British Association for Performing Arts Medicine, Ton Kooiman, Mundo Music Gear, The Pegmate

PLEASE NOTE: This event has been organised by Naomi as part of her research therefore all sessions will be recorded and attendees will be treated as research participants and required to sign a consent form at registration on the day; all data collected at the event will be kept confidential and published anonymously. The research elements of the day have received approval from the RNCM Research Ethics Committee.