Posts Tagged ‘NHS’

NHS Specialist Voice Clinics Vocal Rehabilitation Coach Pilot

Friday, May 10th, 2019

BAPAM is excited to announce the start of a new pilot project, in which we are funding a Vocal Rehabilitation Coach (VRC) to work alongside clinicians in NHS Professional Voice User Clinics.

Vocal health problems in singers and actors are often multifactorial, requiring a specialised multi-disciplinary approach to diagnosis, in order to get patients onto the right pathways of treatment and rehabilitation and back to performing as quickly as possible. Over the last two years, we have been working with a group of clinical experts in this area, including Laryngologists and Voice-specialist Speech and Language Therapists, who have advised us that adding a Vocal Coach into this team – an experienced singing teacher with understanding of the clinical processes in vocal health – would further help the diagnosis and rehabilitation of performer patients. Lewisham and Greenwich NHS Trust already employ a Vocal Rehabilitation Coach and BAPAM has agreed to fund a VRC post across up to three NHS hospitals for a pilot year, with funding support from PPL, Help Musicians UK, Musicians’ Union and Equity, following which the pilot will be independently evaluated to assess the requirements for the VRC role and the effectiveness of this model in the care of performers. Dane Chalfin, an experienced VRC and singing teacher, is taking on the role for the initial 12 months’ pilot. The first of these BAPAM-funded clinics has just started at Wythenshawe Hospital, part of Manchester University NHS Foundation Trust. Guy’s and St. Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust is expecting to start to offer this additional service from September, and a third NHS Trust is expected to be confirmed soon.

BAPAM undertook a survey across existing specialist Voice Clinics in order to develop the competencies required to work in this new role and these were reviewed and approved by our Vocal Health clinical experts and adopted by the BAPAM Medical Committee. There is currently no professional body able to provide formal registration of VRCs and BAPAM hopes that by facilitating a process whereby experienced vocal coaches can demonstrate that they meet a set of competencies, we can help provide a level of confidence in this role both to the NHS and to performers themselves, and reassure our funders that we are investing in the best services. Four practitioners who meet these competencies have so far been approved to join a new section of the BAPAM Directory of Practitioners as VRCs, and we are hoping to expand this number in the near future. We can provide guidance to practitioners interested in this field towards appropriate training that may be required to meet our competences.

We hope that this pilot will provide some initial evidence to support the involvement of practitioners with an educational background in the rehabilitation of performers and, specifically, the wider adoption of this practice to improve patient care in vocal health. If the pilot is successful, we hope to be able to secure funding to support substantive VRC appointments going forward via an open appointments process. This work takes place against a backdrop of developing education and science in vocal health, with practitioners at the UCL Performing Arts Medicine MSc and the MA in Vocal Pedagogy at the University of Wales undertaking exciting new studies which are increasing our understanding in this area of performing arts health. BAPAM is pleased to be able to make this small contribution to continuing improvement in vocal health for performers.

Further enquiries are welcome via info@bapam.org.uk

Related information:

BAPAM VRC Competencies

Volunteers Needed for Movement and Balance Study

Thursday, June 9th, 2016

Are you interested in how your body works when you move? A new study being undertaken by physiotherapist, Janet Deane, may be of special interest to performers engaging in physically active practice. Janet, who previously helped many performers as a BAPAM clinician, is now working within the NHS recruiting healthy participants for a spinal study for Arthritis Research U.K.

The overall goal of the project is to examine movement and balance strategies in order to understand and improve back rehabilitation.

Janet is looking to recruit healthy participants (with no low back pain) over the age of 40. Everyone taking part will receive a free MRI scan (30 mins) of their low back (worth £200) and a 2 hour biomechanical assessment of their spine and lower limbs at Charing Cross hospital at Hammersmith.

If you’d like to find out more about taking part please contact Janet Deane by emailing j.deane@imperial.ac.uk.

All volunteers will receive a detailed information sheet before confirming participation and may leave the study at any time. The study has been approved by both the NHS and Imperial ethics committees.

The Good Musculoskeletal Doctor – Have Your Say

Wednesday, April 22nd, 2015

A deliberative conference organised by the British Institute of Musculoskeletal Medicine (BIMM)

View/download the full programme details here: Programme & Details Good MSK Doctor 2015

To register interest in attending the conference, or simply to contribute your observations or remarks, you can use this form, which should be returned to BIMM: Register Interest Good MSK Doctor 2015

Thursday 18th June 2015

The Royal Orthopaedic Hospital
Bristol Road
South Birmingham
B31 2AP.

Medical involvement in musculoskeletal services at the interface: do you provide patient care at grades from GPSI to clinical independence; manage or commission such services; lead clinical teams; are you training doctors for this role, or in such training?

If so, this conference is aimed at you.

Musculoskeletal services need medical input but it is by no means clear or agreed what that input should be. Currently, service design varies around the UK, so
experience with different models is available to inform progress. Obstacles to development come in many forms but lack of communication, consultation and consensus are major adverse factors that this conference will address.

The programme will draw contributions from all relevant medical specialists involved in provision of musculoskeletal services. Presentations will address the
roles, competences and training of the musculoskeletal doctors of the future, with contributions also from those affected by medical care in this area: physiotherapists, patients, purchasers, educators.

It is intended that an active audience will bring their experiences and expectations of the field to test ideas emerging from the panel debates. Outcomes from this process will be available to inform the work of the Musculoskeletal Clinical Networks on Workforce and Training established by ARMA under the auspices of NHSE.

When expressing interest in the conference, you will be asked what your particular field of interest and experience is: You may be invited, or you can offer, to give a specific input so that the platform presentations can cover the field geographically and by approach. All attending are encouraged to contribute from the floor at each stage.

Research into Musicians’ Dystonia at UCL Institute of Neurology

Monday, January 20th, 2014

The Pathophysiology of Dystonia

Are you a musician with focal dystonia?

A team of researchers at the UCL Institute of Neurology and The National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, led by Dr Mark Edwards, are particularly interested in hearing from musicians with focal (task-specific) dystonia. The aim is to develop methods for assessing the symptoms, and discover information which will be useful in future clinical trials. It is important to note that the study is not, in itself, a clinical trial for treatment of dystonia.

Musicians participating will need to attend multiple sessions at the Institute of Neurology with their instruments (a keyboard can be provided). You would need to able to attend 12 sessions which last one hour or less. The design requires four sessions in four consecutive days which are repeated three times with a gap of a few weeks in between. Travel expenses will be covered and times and dates are generally very flexible.  The study uses transcranial magnetic stimulation within specific safe parameters. It is not invasive, does not involve pain and is generally very well tolerated by participants.

The team hope to establish a specific clinic for this type of dystonia.

If you have this form of dystonia and would like to be seen in clinic or are interested in taking part in studies please email Dr Mark Edwards, Consultant Neurologist, via: m.j.edwards@ucl.ac.uk.

The team will provide full information to anyone interested in taking part.

Research Ethics Committee approval for this study has been granted by the NHS National Research Ethics Service.

BAPAM talk at Cardiff Medical Society

Monday, October 28th, 2013

On Tuesday 12th November,  BAPAM Chief Executive, Dr Deborah Charnock, will give a presentation to the Cardiff Medical Society, which was established in 1870 to encourage the advancement of medical knowledge and to promote the welfare of the medical profession. Our Cardiff clinicians, Dr Gareth Hayes and Dr Sion Edwards, will also be there.

We aim to raise awareness of the BAPAM clinic in Cardiff (held at the Royal Welsh College of Music and Drama) and our health care work with performing artists in the region, and look forward to meeting local doctors, health care practitioners, educators, students and arts professionals. All are welcome, so if you’re interested in any aspect of performers’ health care, well-being, education, training and practice, please do come along to what will be an informative evening and a good opportunity to make new connections.

Venue: Theatre 2, Cardiff University School of Medicine, University Hospital of Wales, Heath Park, Cardiff, CF14 4XW. Map.

Gathering at 6.30. Light refreshments available. Lecture starting 7pm. The event is free to attend.