Posts Tagged ‘Orchestra’

International Symposium in Performance Science, Reykjavik

Thursday, September 28th, 2017

The MSc in Performing Arts Medicine and BAPAM were well represented this month at the International Symposium in Performance Science (ISPS) in Reykjavik, Iceland, with research papers by Dr Trish Halliwell, Dr Philippa Whebble, Dr Farrah Jawad, Dr Hara Trouli, osteopath Tommi Sliiden and physiotherapists Kari Arnason, Lindsay Wallace and Krzystoff Dabrowski. Projects on flautists’ injuries, breathing relaxation for singers, vitamin D levels in dancers, health issues of popular musicians, lung function when singing and dancing, muscle injuries in string players, footwear and dancers’ injuries, and palmaris longus in pianists were received with great interest by the conference delegates. It is important to see such a group on the international arena of Performing Arts Medicine and we hope this will encourage more researchers to bring their work to this level. Congratulations to all involved!

Survey: Musical ergonomics in professional UK orchestras

Thursday, February 9th, 2017

Are you a musician working in a professional UK-based orchestra? Could you help us support research into performer healthcare by completing a short anonymous survey on musical ergonomics?

If so, please read the information below before you complete the survey. The survey should take no more than 5 minutes.

Subject: A survey of musicians’ knowledge, access to and use of musical ergonomics in professional UK orchestras.

Hello my name is Teresa Airley, and I would like to invite musicians’ aged 18 years or over, working in professional UK-based orchestras, to participate in a voluntary and anonymous survey on musical ergonomics.  I am undertaking an MSc in performing arts medicine at University College London, and I am interested in learning what motivates musicians to use ergonomic aids.

What are ergonomics? Ergonomics are aids that support musicians within their working environment.  These can be instrument specific adaptations to help reduce playing discomfort, or improve playing posture.  For example chin or thumb rests, or straps to support instrument weight and maintain good posture.  Or, advice on healthy practice such as posture, warm-ups, stretches, and regular breaks.  Environmental ergonomics include appropriate seating, lighting, and hearing protection within performing venues.

Why is this study being done?  Musicians are at risk of developing playing-related injuries.  Education on healthy practice and use of ergonomic aids can help to reduce, or prevent injuries.  My survey explores what motivates musicians to use ergonomic aids, and how knowledge of musical ergonomics is acquired, and what benefits or barriers there are to using ergonomics at work.

Consent: Completing the survey implies consent to participate in this research study, and as participation is anonymous it will not be possible to withdraw your data once you have completed your questionnaire.

How and what data will be collected, and where will it be stored? This survey is anonymous and all information you provide is confidential.   No individuals will be identified in any reports arising from this research.  The survey is available via Opinio and all data gathered is held securely within University College London data centres.  This project has been approved by the UCL Research Ethics Committee.

Contact information: If you would like more information regarding the study please email me direct at teresa.airley.15@ucl.ac.uk Please visit the British Association for Performing Arts Medicine (BAPAM) website at www.bapam.org.uk for further information on specialist health support available to performing artists.  Free specialist medical advice is available from BAPAM.  For enquiries telephone: 020 7404 8444 or email: info@bapam.org.uk

Access the survey here

Thank you for your time.

Prevalence Study: Musculoskeletal Problems in Professional Orchestra Musicians in Scotland

Thursday, July 7th, 2016

Patrice Berque (a BAPAM-registered physiotherapist based in Glasgow) has contributed a paper relating to the prevalence of PRMPs (Playing-Related Musculoskeletal Problems) among professional orchestra musicians in Scotland to the journal Medical Problems of Performing Artists (MPPA).

This study is the first prevalence study among professional musicians in Scotland, and one of very few in the UK. It shows the prevalence rates of PRMPs among the three orchestras that took part in this study.

A poster summarises the main results of this study. This poster will be presented at IFOMPT 2016, the World Congress of Musculoskeletal Physiotherapy on 8th July in Glasgow at the SECC.

The MPIIQM questionnaire, developed and validated prior to this study, is also available for download from Patrice’s webpage and may be used as a screening tool for injury prevention to measure pain prevalence of PRMPs.

Performing Health Psychology Event

Wednesday, May 20th, 2015

Raluca Matei and Dr Benjamin Gardner have sent us the following information about their interesting research into health psychology in professional orchestral musicians. Read on to find out more, and if you’d be interested in taking part, please contact Raluca Matei directly at raluca.matei@hotmail.com

Tutti for health and wellbeing

If you are a professional orchestral player and want to:

  • sostenuto your health and wellbeing or
  • glissando from being controlled by your health to controlling it yourself (more like you control your instrumental technique) or
  • piu forte on how to implement behaviour change and maintain it through tricks that could become self-sustainable or
  • resonate just like your instrument through forming healthy habits and a wellbeing ostinato…

… then you are invited to attend a free interactive workshop supported by the British Psychological Society (which awarded this proposal the Public Engagement Grant 2015). This is an innovative approach to musicians’ health through the lenses of health psychology in general and behaviour change in particular.

What is health psychology? It is an emerging field aimed at the scientific study of the psychological processes that are relevant for the understanding of aspects such as how health can be promoted and maintained, and how illnesses can be treated and prevented in the first place.

What does behaviour change refer to? In this case, it is meant as an array of evidence-based tools by which one can initiate and maintain change in one’s lifestyle and health-related behaviours.

As psychologists, we need your input and feedback on how to tailor existing evidence to your needs so that together, we attach meaning to this inter-disciplinary collaboration.

This event complements the ongoing work of BAPAM and partner organisations providing specialist health support  to performing arts professionals as well as with the development of the health resources offered by BAPAM in order to sustain both musicians’ wellbeing and high quality music making.

Tempo: A comfortable one/walking pace

Key signature: Health and Wellbeing

Main theme: Prevention with motifs of Lifestyle and Behaviour Change

Performers: Raluca Matei and Dr. Ben Gardner in spoken duet with you

Date and venue: TBC according to expressed interest

Raluca Matei is currently an AHRC-funded PhD student at the Royal Northern College of Music, focusing on health promotion among musicians. She has a background in health psychology and music (has studied violin with Maxim Vengerov at the Menuhin Academy in Switzerland).

Dr. Benjamin Gardner is a Senior Lecturer in Psychology at King’s College London. His expertise is in habit formation as applied to initiating and maintaining behaviour change. As a research psychologist, he is also interested in health promotion in general.

If you are interested in taking part, please email Raluca Mateiraluca.matei@hotmail.com

Event Report – State of Play 2013

Monday, April 8th, 2013

Event organiser, Ian MacDonald, reports on the State of Play – A study day for performers, healthcare practitioners, music teachers, manufacturers and modifiers of musical instruments,  23rd March 2013. 

This mini-conference was inspired by all the wonderful inventions, additions and props created by passionate musicians, teachers and practitioners to assist their performing. Though for some, the process of amending and/or adjusting ‘the musical interface’ (the instrument) is second nature – better facilitating them to do what they love – it strikes me that it is still generally considered a black art.

Where adapting the traditional instrument dimensions in a bespoke manner really comes into its own, is in helping youngsters play instruments without injury and in helping musicians recover from injury and accident. There is also amazing work being done with disabled children and adults at places like www.joyofsound.net, creating guitars that have special vibrating panels for deaf people, cellos that are fixed and angled to make wheelchair approach possible, two-way zithers that have double docking space for two wheelchair users to sit at it etc.

Playing aids, props, straps, rests etc are of course of interest to clinicians and practitioners working with performers but often either practitioners don’t know specific items exist, or have seen products on the web but are not sure how they work in practice or indeed if they actually work safely as empirical evidence supporting the marketing claims is difficult to find.

State of Play delegates were a mixture of professional performers, conservatoire teachers, students, lecturers, researchers, healthcare professionals, musicians and a dancer. A number had suffered some form of nerve compression problem in the past so had a vested interest in the presenting subject. Across the board, feedback about the day was positive with particular pleasure from all in seeing a right-handed trumpet being taken apart by Dave Woodhead then reassembled for a left-handed player with cable ties in about 5 minutes; perfectly playable with no need for any new bits to be made. Dave explained to us that there is no limit to adjustments you can make to brass instruments. Materials can be changed for look, weight or to avoid allergic reaction. Crooks (U-shaped bits of the tubing) and the direction of tubing can be shaped and amended to suit hand size, arm length, neck length or to assist getting back to playing again post-trauma….in fact there is now a small plastic trombone on the market that is light and easier to control even if you are a small person of 6 or 7. And it sounds okay too!

Marcus Reynolds presented his invention, Stratos, demonstrating it with a nifty trombone solo. He has worked on the Stratos for many years, since a serious accident left him injured. The device is used to facilitate better lip, jaw and head posture for trombonist (and for all other brass instrumentalists) as well as to provide structural and stabilising support. It was great news to hear that he is now getting commissions from all over the country to reward him for the dedicated years, time, money and sheer genius of creation.

The afternoon gave us the duet of Nicole Wilson and Helena Wood, violinists with ENO Orchestra. All the delegates agreed that these two musicians could go on the road with a fantastic presentation covering their experience in the working environment, ergonomics, musicianship, technical expertise, knowledge of the great variety of available equipment (e.g. chin and neck rests, seating) and their extremely funny way of communicating all these ideas.

Guitar tutor, Paul Sogaard rounded off the day, expertly reviewing the different posture issues faced by the three main designs of guitar, acoustic, electric and bass. As a long time member of the BAPAM Directory of Performing Arts Medicine Practitioners, he focused on many of the ergonomic problems tackled by musicians, demonstrating the various adjustments to the guitar interface and discussing the eternal questions of what additional tools and equipment (if any) to use… Again, research into the long term health benefits of using foot stool, neck straps or ergoplay support is sparse.

Student Research Projects

The day also included representatives from the first year of the MSc in Performing Arts Medicine with presentations from Efthalia Palaiokastriti, Physiotherapist and guitarist (Investigating functional scoliosis in guitarists using different guitar support tools), Isabel Artigues Cano, Physiotherapist and flautist (Evaluating hypermobility of finger joints in flautists) and Dr Hara Trouli’s (Performance measures in pianists with clinical sympomatology in the upper limbs: a cross-sectional study using EMG, digital pianos recordings and video postural analysis).

The State of Play 2013 – Musical Instrument Day

Thursday, February 14th, 2013

Saturday 23rd March

10:00-17:00
(Registration from 09:30)
Saturday 23rd March

The Old Refectory, Wilkins Building, Main Quadrangle, University College London WC1E 6BT

A study day for performers, healthcare practitioners, music teachers, manufacturers and modifiers of musical instruments

Enhancing performance and facilitating healthier practice

Bespoke instrument modifications and manufacturing technology

Investigating tools for musicians’ rehabilitation from injury

Configuring the musical interface for healthy performance

Musical instrument ergonomics 

Sessions focusing on brass, strings and guitar

Full Day £75 Half Day £40

BAPAM Practitioner £65

Students £50

To reserve your place please email admin@bapam.org.uk and we’ll send you a booking form. 

More information: State of Play Instrument Day Programme

Photo: MFHiatt

Association of British Orchestras Conference Report

Friday, February 1st, 2013

How best do we support musicians to deal with the stresses and potential health problems associated with their working lives?

BAPAM Interim Chief Executive, Deborah Charnock, and AMABO Doctor and Honorary Physician to BAPAM, Dr Jonathan White, joined a panel discussion on performer healthcare at the 2013 ABO conference, held 23-25 January in Leeds.

The session, Wellbeing – Buzzword or Reality, was chaired by David Sulkin, Chief Executive of the Musicians Benevolent Fund. Fellow panelists included Alex Gascoine, musician from the BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra and Simon Webb, Director of Orchestral Management at the City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra.

The well-attended discussion involved lively comment from performers, managers and educators. There was an abundance of positive feedback about BAPAM’s essential provision of specialist and confidential advice and guidance about performance-related health problems. Major well-being issues mentioned by delegates were stress, mental health, and addiction problems, particularly alcohol (see this issue of Alcoholis - The Bulletin of the Medical Council on Alcohol, and Dr Jenny Lisle’s article, Alcohol and the Performing Arts).

Discussions included the responsibility of managers to create open and supportive working environments, as well as the role of peers as advocates for performer health. Such issues should also be seen in the broader context of public health policy.

Musicians Health Day

Tuesday, November 13th, 2012

Honorary Lecturers for the MSc in Performing Arts Medicine, Jennie Morton and Ian MacDonald, have organised this practical day for educators and health professionals involved in the care of musicians, to be held at UCL on 15th December 2012 (please note: this is an independent training event and is not organised by BAPAM).

Musicians Health Day 2012

Saturday 15th December 2012

10:00am – 5.00pm

University College London

Wilkins Haldane Room, Gower Street, London. WC1E 6BT

The day will include:

A comprehensive overview of orchestral instruments

Common injuries in musicians

Practical assessment of the instrumental musician

Instrument ergonomics and adaptations

Healthy practise advice

7 hours CPD

Course Fee: £95 (Students £75)

Course Tutors:

Jennie Morton BSc (Hons) Osteopathy

UCL Honorary Lecturer for the MSc in Performing Arts Medicine

Osteopath & Lecturer for The British Association for Performing Arts Medicine

Ian MacDonald MSc (Vocal Pathology); Dip RCM; ARCM; ALCM

UCL Course Tutor and Honorary Lecturer for MSc in Performing Arts Medicine

Voice Pathologist and Rehabilitation Specialist for The British Association for Performing Arts Medicine

Guest Lecturer Royal Academy of Music and Royal College of Music in Health Promotion & Professional Development

For further info or to request a booking form, please email jennie@jenniemorton.co.uk

2012 Conservatoire Health and Wellbeing Symposium

Thursday, July 5th, 2012

Hosted by the Royal Welsh College of Music and Drama on Tuesday 10th July, this symposium brings representatives from student services, student welfare and student unions from across all UK conservatoires together to discuss issues in and around:

  • Sustaining and enhancing desirable environments for study
  • Promoting and developing health and wellbeing resources
  • Enriching student experience and performance
  • Building participatory partnerships where best practice can be shared

Representatives of the Healthy Universities project and the Healthy Orchestra Charter as well as the Musicians Benevolent Fund Student Health Scheme will be there to join the discussion and share ideas on ’How conservatoires deal with…’

 

 

BAPAM Birmingham Training Day May 14th

Tuesday, March 22nd, 2011

Midlands Medicine, Music and Movement

UPDATE: The finalised programme for the day is now online. Click here to view/download it.

Liz Johnson would like some practitioners to bring in their instruments for her afternoon Soundbeam session, so if you play an instrument and it’s easy to carry, please do join in!

That BVSC venue that is hosting the day will direct everyone to our room on the day and please simply ask for BAPAM at reception.

To book your place at the next BAPAM Performing Arts Medicine Training Day please return this response form to Sanchita Farruque at the BAPAM office. The price is just £65 (£45 for students). BAPAM training days may be used as part of your CPD portfolio.

BAPAM’s Birmingham Training Day on Saturday 14th May runs from 9.30am to 5pm and will have three core strands:

  • The Conservatoire – focusing on student problems and training, rehab after injury etc
  • The CBSO – focusing on the orchestral musician
  • The Birmingham Royal Ballet- focusing on dance issues

Programme and speakers are being finalised by the Birmingham BAPAM team, made up of Dr Jonathan White and Karen O’Connor. We’ll be covering subjects like:

  • Performance Coaching, the Bach to Sport project at the Birmingham Conservatoire, and other student/tutor related issues
  • Nutrition & Fitness and the Female Athlete Triad
  • Case presentations of some unusual problems e.g. trumpet player with rare embouchure problem, amateur wind player with a Handelian condition, and a pop musician with a neurological event

The Training Day will take place at BVSC, The Centre for Voluntary Action in the Digbeth area of Birmingham.

More detailed information here: Birmingham Bites! Midlands Medicine, Music and Movement and check back for the full programme soon.

There is a CBSO Concert on Saturday night at Symphony Hall starting at 7pm (finishing around 9pm). Karen has negotiated a block of excellent seats in the Upper Circle of Symphony Hall for £14.50 each. But we need to know straight away if you want to book a ticket! Just give Sanchita a call on 020 7404 5888.

RUSSIAN CLASSICS

Andrew Litton  conductor Simon Trpceski piano

Prokofiev: War and Peace – Overture    6′
Rachmaninov: Piano Concerto No. 2   32′
Shostakovich: Symphony No. 10          46′