Posts Tagged ‘pain’

Alexander Technique Research Update

Tuesday, July 24th, 2018

If you’re interested in the ergonomics of musicianship then you may remember a previous post where we featured the research of Alison Loram. Alison is a violinist and BAPAM-registered Alexander Technique teacher working with performers. Alison is also a research scientist in the field of musicians health (and biodiversity in domestic gardens), and has published a number of papers.

Exploring the premise that musicians are subject to a wide range of medical and performance-related problems due to physical and psychological demands, Alison’s thesis for her masters in Performing Arts Medicine, which is now published and open access, looked into chronic profession-limiting problems in musicians: Underlying mechanisms and neuroplastic routes to recovery

A related presentation considers the scientific basis of the Alexander Technique, and presents results of experimental research into Alexander teaching methodology: Explaining the Alexander Technique to clinicians and scientists: Psycho-physical re-education – an introduction to cognitive-motor system-level causes of performance-related problems.

Prevalence Study: Musculoskeletal Problems in Professional Orchestra Musicians in Scotland

Thursday, July 7th, 2016

Patrice Berque (a BAPAM-registered physiotherapist based in Glasgow) has contributed a paper relating to the prevalence of PRMPs (Playing-Related Musculoskeletal Problems) among professional orchestra musicians in Scotland to the journal Medical Problems of Performing Artists (MPPA).

This study is the first prevalence study among professional musicians in Scotland, and one of very few in the UK. It shows the prevalence rates of PRMPs among the three orchestras that took part in this study.

A poster summarises the main results of this study. This poster will be presented at IFOMPT 2016, the World Congress of Musculoskeletal Physiotherapy on 8th July in Glasgow at the SECC.

The MPIIQM questionnaire, developed and validated prior to this study, is also available for download from Patrice’s webpage and may be used as a screening tool for injury prevention to measure pain prevalence of PRMPs.

Pianists Research

Wednesday, April 25th, 2012

Pianists, are you interested in taking part in research into arm tension and other painful conditions? 

Medical doctor and pianist, Dr Hara Trouli, is looking for advanced students and professional pianists to take part in this project. Dr Trouli explains:

I am a medical doctor and a pianist, currently also a student of the first Masters Degree on Performing Arts Medicine at University College London that was developed by BAPAM (British Association of Performing Arts Medicine) in collaboration with the Royal College of Music and Trinity Laban.  I am conducting research on pianists’ arm tension and other painful conditions under the supervision of Professor Howard Bird who is a UK specialist in performers’ health.

We need to see advanced students or professional pianists who have suffered at some point a medical or painful condition (either diagnosed or not) of the upper limb or the cervical spine (hands, wrist, arms or neck) and analyse their piano playing through a triple method of video/ MIDI/ Electromyography.

The idea is to see whether these conditions show signs on the graphs of muscle tension in the arms and neck (electromyography), velocity, force and articulation of piano playing (MIDI) and on postural images of the hand and arm (video). We are aiming to bridge the technical pianistic accomplishment with the clinical history and to measure parameters that would be reproducible and available to both the pianists and the doctors for evaluation. We are also trying to see whether these parameters can be used in monitoring the progress of the pianist during recovery from a painful condition or an injury, and to also enable the pianist to use this method as biofeedback when they re-train.

The assessment of each pianist lasts 2 hours, it takes place in a studio in North London and travel expenses are covered up to £10.00.   Full information and consent sheets will be given to you before your assessment. We would need to see you in April or May and appointments can be made for any weekday or the weekends. We will also be pleased to share the results of your assessment with you and send you a full report of the recorded images. All information that we will receive from you is kept strictly confidential.

Please contact Dr Trouli directly if you’d like to get involved: haratrouli@googlemail.com  

Photo by David Denicolò