Posts Tagged ‘performance anxiety’

Training Event for Music Teachers – Promoting Health and Well-Being in Music Lessons

Wednesday, December 11th, 2013

10.00 – 17.00, Sunday 19th January 2014
Royal Northern College of Music

 

Naomi Norton, BAPAM Student Advocate Scheme Manager and PhD student at the Royal Northern College of Music, would like to invite you to attend a training event to be held at the RNCM on Sunday 19th January 2014.

This event is open to all musicians and other interested parties, although sessions will focus on the music lesson environment and therefore are likely to be most relevant to instrumental and vocal teachers (all ages, instruments and genres).

Attendance at the event costs only £28, with a further £3 discount available to any individuals who have participated in Naomi’s previous research study (available here).

Registration for the event will open at 9.30am and sessions will run from 10.00 – 16.00 on Sunday 19th January 2014; optional focus group discussions will take place following the event from 16.15 – 17.00

To book your place please contact Naomi Norton by email naomi.norton@student.rncm.ac.uk

More information is available via the RNCM Box Office.

The day aims to provide practical information regarding how to avoid or manage performance-related problems and how to pass this information on to instrumental/vocal pupils.

Sessions:

Performance-related problems Drusilla Redman
Health support Deborah Charnock
String Specialist Christine Harrison
Performance Anxiety Carol Chapman
Psycho-Physical Re-Education Alison Loram
Vocal Specialist Ian MacDonald
Wind and Brass Specialist Andrew Roberts
Performance Coaching Karen O’Connor
Focus group sessions Volunteer delegates and speakers

See RNCM Box Office page for speaker biographies

Event Sponsors: The British Association for Performing Arts Medicine, Ton Kooiman, Mundo Music Gear, The Pegmate

PLEASE NOTE: This event has been organised by Naomi as part of her research therefore all sessions will be recorded and attendees will be treated as research participants and required to sign a consent form at registration on the day; all data collected at the event will be kept confidential and published anonymously. The research elements of the day have received approval from the RNCM Research Ethics Committee.

Event Report: Performers in their Environment Training Day

Thursday, November 28th, 2013

Our November 2013 event brought together actors and musicians with professionals working in performing arts healthcare, education and support and welfare, for a stimulating investigation into the work, lifestyle and health realities of the industry.

Professor of Performance Science, Aaron Williamon, discussed musicians’ hearing and the tricky issue of noise regulations for workers for whom noise is their product.

Philip Turner, Senior Stage Manager of the English National Opera, shared valuable expertise and insights into the considerations of caring for performers, crew, and audience, and in supervising the work environment, both at the ENO in London, and on touring productions. Osteopath, Jennie Morton, presented on workplace hazards, drawing from her work as a performer (dance/theatre/singing).

Former professional oboist turned pioneering Performance Coach, Karen O’Connor, was joined by a singer and a double bassist to discuss novel applications of sport psychology for managing performance anxiety and developing mental toughness.

We also heard from professional performers about the ups and downs of their careers. Jungle Drummer, Chris Polglase, talked us through his career, from leaving music school in frustration at course requirements that he learn endless indie rock parts, to turning a hobby into a sustained professional career playing 180bpm drum & bass beats, alongside turntablists and musicians from a diverse spectrum of styles. Chris talked about the pressures of extensive touring, playing 5am gigs at clubs and festivals, studio sessions, and gradually learning self confidence and how to care for yourself.

Bringing a fascinating day to a close, David Sulkin, Chief Executive of the Musicians Benevolent Fund, interviewed two actors at very different stages of their careers – covering the stresses (physical, emotional and financial) and rewards of the profession.

We’d like to thank all the speakers, performers and attendees.  All agreed that first hand discussion with performing arts professionals proved especially valuable in providing perspective for those who seek to help care for their health and welfare. Thanks also to the Musicians’ Union for so generously providing the venue.

More information about our Training Days can be found here: BAPAM Training Days.

Research: How Musicians Experience Forms of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT)

Tuesday, October 22nd, 2013

Call for Participants: 

 

Ellis Pecen is a Masters student in Performance Science at the Royal College of Music, interested in exploring how musicians experience forms of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT). To do this, a short anonymous online survey has been developed that should take about 15-20 minutes to complete. In this survey you will be asked anonymous questions about your musical background and your experiences with CBT. The research has received ethical approval from the Conservatoires UK Research Ethics Committee.

Who can take part?

The recruitment criteria for taking part are:

1. That you are a musician (or former musician) with experiences with CBT. You can be a student, professional or a musician who plays as part of a hobby, regardless of age or experience.

2. That you are undergoing or have undergone CBT treatment. There are many approaches to CBT and many forms of delivery (e.g. private/group counselling, computerized CBT, CBT via self-help methods etc.). All forms are valid for the purposes of this research, yet in order to ensure a consistent definition of CBT we are interested in interventions that adhere to the following characteristics:

i. CBT is based on the theory that our thoughts determine our feelings and behaviour and that, therefore, changing the way we think allows us to change the way we feel and behave.

ii. CBT is problem-focused and goal-oriented. The emphasis is on the ‘now’ and the future rather than the past.

iii. CBT requires active participation from clients in the form of homework assignments designed to apply the acquired skills from the sessions to real-life situations.

iv. Clients are educated about their symptoms and are made aware of strategies to enable positive change

How do I take part?

If you feel that you meet the above criteria and would like to complete the anonymous survey, please follow this link: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/GHVPSZX

If you have any further questions about the research, feel free to contact Ellis at ellis.pecen@rcm.ac.uk

Thank you for taking the time to read through this information and considering participating in the research. You help is most appreciated!

 

Research into Musicians’ Approaches to Musical Practice

Wednesday, June 19th, 2013

Emese Hruska, a PhD researcher at the University of Roehampton, is recruiting London based musicians to help her look at musicians’ attitudes and experiences towards their musical practice.

This current project is part of her PhD research, and it involves interviewing  musicians regarding their experiences and views about their musicianship , their musical and individual identity. Interviews will take about 1 hour, and can be arranged at a suitable location chosen by the participating musician to express his/her thoughts and feelings freely. Participants must be based in London.

Emese’s long term goal is that the findings will contribute to developments in preventing and/or managing problems related to music performance anxiety and perfectionism in musicians. On completion of the project, Emese intends to equip musicians with adaptable empowerment strategies for strength, persistence, positivity, autonomy etc.

If you are interested in taking part, please contact Emese directly by email: hruskae@roehampton.ac.uk

This project has been approved by the Research Ethics Committee at the University of Roehampton.

The results of the project will be shared with BAPAM, and we’ll report back at a future date.

 

Autogenic Training Course with Giovanna Reitano

Monday, December 17th, 2012

This course is provided independently by Giovanna Reitano, an AT practitioner with a background in the performing arts (music, drama and storytelling), and a member of the British Autogenic Society and the BAPAM Directory of Performing Arts Medicine Practitioners.

To find out more and for bookings, please contact Giovanna directly at autogenic-training@musarteandmore.com.

Enhancing Performance with Autogenic Training

Autogenic Training (AT) is a simple relaxation technique and alternative therapy which helps to reduce stress and stress-related conditions, enhance performance, and general well-being.

The seven weeks AT sessions/course helps to:

Bring the body and mind into a state of awake relaxation at will, for example also before or after a performance.

Reduce stress symptoms such as anxiety, stage fright, panic attacks, muscular and emotional tension, headaches and migraines, tiredness, sleeplessness.

Improve focus, concentration and creativity.

Enhance performance and self-esteem.

Develop a calmer attitude to stressful situations.

Venue: The British Association for Performing Arts Medicine (BAPAM), Totara Park House, 4th Floor, 34–36 Gray’s Inn Road, London WC1X 8HR.

Cost: A course of 7 weekly sessions costs £185.

Musical Athletes

Thursday, July 5th, 2012

This Weekend, 7th/8th July, the Cheltenham Music Festival plays host to Musical Athletes, a series of talks on the musical body – how it works, how it sometimes doesn’t work, and how it can be fixed. Organised jointly by BAPAM and the Cheltenham Festivals Laboratory, the event takes a look at the musculoskeletal demands on musicians’ bodies, voice production, injuries and breathing techniques, as well as complementary therapies including Alexander Technique and Mindfulness.

Aaron Williamon, Professor of Performance Science at the Royal College of Music, will be analysing the physiological effects of performance on concert pianist, Melvyn Tan, by measuring his heart rate, breathing, skin temperature and posture during his solo recital on Sunday morning. You can read more about Professor Williamon’s project in this Guardian piece by Tom Service (4th July, 2012).

BAPAM Newsletter April 2012

Thursday, April 12th, 2012

Our April 2012 Newsletter is now available to download in pdf format here:

BAPAM Newsletter April 2012

 

BAPAM Training Day May 19 – Key Psychological Issues

Thursday, April 5th, 2012

BAPAM training events provide an in-depth look at some of the key areas of Performing Arts Medicine and unique insights into aspects of performers’ health and wellbeing. Our May 2012 event focuses on the psychological issues encountered by performing artists.

Performing artists work in a highly competitive industry and are driven to achieve perfect results. Stress and anxiety are often in the background when performers present with physical symptoms. In addition, the psychological impact of an injury affecting performance can be tough to deal with. All health care practitioners working with actors, dancers, musicians, singers and other artists will find something here to apply in their practice.

BAPAM training events may be used as part of your CPD portfolio.

The programme for the day covers:

  • Diagnosis
  • Depression/bipolar
  • Anxiety
  • Career choices and development
  • Performance coaching
  • Autogenic Training
  • Role play as a therapeutic tool
  • Screening tools for psychological problems

Click here for the detailed programme

The cost of the day is £65 (Students £35).

Venue: University College London, Gower Street, London, WC1E 6BT – Closest tube: Warren Street. We will update with the exact room numbers/campus directions as soon as we have confirmation from UCL.

To book your place or for more information please email Office and Clinics Manager, Clare Hicks, via clare@bapam.org.uk

Hypnosis Unit UK CPD Introductory Course

Tuesday, March 6th, 2012

Performing Arts Medicine practitioners, are you interested in the possible applications of hypnosis in your own profession?

Hypnosis Unit UK provide an Introductory Course in Applied Hypnosis. The next course takes place on Saturday 28th April 2012, at UCL Division of Psychology and Language Sciences.

Further information (pdf)

Stage Fright, Well-being and Recovery Survey Results

Wednesday, November 16th, 2011

We had a fantastic response to our request for help with Danica Giles’ Stage Fright and Well-being Survey. Huge thanks to all the performers who took part – 260 in all, of whom 167 were BAPAM patients!

This summary of the results of the study contains some demographic information on the participants, followed by brief explanations of the assumptions tested and the results.

The last part contains the interpretation of the results. Danica has tried to turn the rather theoretical findings into as many practical tips as possible and has also referred to previous research.

If you are not interested in all the details, just skip to the very last page with a summary of all
recovery tips!

Download the results here.