Posts Tagged ‘Performance Science’

Survey: Musical ergonomics in professional UK orchestras

Thursday, February 9th, 2017

Are you a musician working in a professional UK-based orchestra? Could you help us support research into performer healthcare by completing a short anonymous survey on musical ergonomics?

If so, please read the information below before you complete the survey. The survey should take no more than 5 minutes.

Subject: A survey of musicians’ knowledge, access to and use of musical ergonomics in professional UK orchestras.

Hello my name is Teresa Airley, and I would like to invite musicians’ aged 18 years or over, working in professional UK-based orchestras, to participate in a voluntary and anonymous survey on musical ergonomics.  I am undertaking an MSc in performing arts medicine at University College London, and I am interested in learning what motivates musicians to use ergonomic aids.

What are ergonomics? Ergonomics are aids that support musicians within their working environment.  These can be instrument specific adaptations to help reduce playing discomfort, or improve playing posture.  For example chin or thumb rests, or straps to support instrument weight and maintain good posture.  Or, advice on healthy practice such as posture, warm-ups, stretches, and regular breaks.  Environmental ergonomics include appropriate seating, lighting, and hearing protection within performing venues.

Why is this study being done?  Musicians are at risk of developing playing-related injuries.  Education on healthy practice and use of ergonomic aids can help to reduce, or prevent injuries.  My survey explores what motivates musicians to use ergonomic aids, and how knowledge of musical ergonomics is acquired, and what benefits or barriers there are to using ergonomics at work.

Consent: Completing the survey implies consent to participate in this research study, and as participation is anonymous it will not be possible to withdraw your data once you have completed your questionnaire.

How and what data will be collected, and where will it be stored? This survey is anonymous and all information you provide is confidential.   No individuals will be identified in any reports arising from this research.  The survey is available via Opinio and all data gathered is held securely within University College London data centres.  This project has been approved by the UCL Research Ethics Committee.

Contact information: If you would like more information regarding the study please email me direct at teresa.airley.15@ucl.ac.uk Please visit the British Association for Performing Arts Medicine (BAPAM) website at www.bapam.org.uk for further information on specialist health support available to performing artists.  Free specialist medical advice is available from BAPAM.  For enquiries telephone: 020 7404 8444 or email: info@bapam.org.uk

Access the survey here

Thank you for your time.

Solo Pop Singers: How do you feel about your wellbeing in the music industry?

Wednesday, February 1st, 2017

 

Professional singers invited to take part in new research project at the Royal College of Music

Are you a professional solo singer in popular music genres including pop, rock, dance, jazz, blues and folk?

Would you like to help develop our understanding of health and wellbeing experiences in the music industry, and inform future support networks?

Lucinda Heyman, a Performance Science researcher at the Royal College of Music, is looking for professional solo singers, signed to a record label or making a living from singing, to be interviewed for a new project. You don’t need to have experienced a health problem to take part. The research covers positive as well as challenging experiences. You may feel that your work in music has positive effects on your health, for instance.

If you are interested in taking part you can contact Lucinda directly by emailing lucinda.heyman@rcm.ac.uk

She will explain the project and provide you with a detailed participant information sheet.

Any information you provide will remain confidential. The project has Research Ethics Committee approval from Conservatoires UK.

YCAT Sounding Board – Health and Wellbeing for Performers

Wednesday, January 11th, 2017

YCAT Sounding Board is the new initiative from the Young Classical Artists Trust (YCAT) to create a leading professional training ground for a broad and diverse range of music graduates and students. YCAT’s fourth career development seminar tackles the vital issue of maintaining your physical and mental wellbeing as a performer. BAPAM trainer, Jane Oakland, a music psychologist and vocal consultant, will be joining the panel to discuss issues around physical and mental wellbeing for those working in performance, and provide techniques to prevent and overcome these issues should they arise. This is a great opportunity to ask questions and discuss the challenges and benefits to all performers in engaging with this essential element of a balanced musical life.

Panel:

Matthew Jones – violist and performance health expert

Jane Oakland – BAPAM registered music psychologist and vocal consultant

Aaron Williamon – Professor of Performance Science, Royal College of Music

Time and Location: Tuesday 24th January – Royal Overseas League, London
Panel discussion: 1 hour
Q&A: 30 mins
Post-seminar: drinks and networking
Cost: £5

All welcome! Tickets are limited. 

Book your tickets here.

 

Dancers Study

Wednesday, November 23rd, 2016

A new international study explores the relationship between physical activity, including dancing, other risk factors (such as diet), and health.

The National Institute of Dance Medicine and Science and the Centre for Sport, Exercise and Osteoarthritis are investigating the long-term effect of these factors and their relation to the risk of disease, including osteoarthritis.

The team are asking participants to complete an online questionnaire, which is anonymous. Taking part is entirely voluntary and if you wish to do so, you are free to withdraw at any time. If you agree to continue you will be asked to complete two more questionnaires which will enable the researchers to get an understanding of how much physical activity/dancing you do and the effects on your overall health, including your lower body joints

The deadline for participation is the 31st of March 2017.

An optional prize draw is available for those who wish to enter.

The link to access the survey is: https://nottingham.onlinesurveys.ac.uk/dance

Performing Arts Medicine Graduates at IADMS Conference in Hong Kong

Tuesday, November 8th, 2016

We are delighted that two of our Performing Arts Medicine graduates from the University College London Master’s degree in Performing Arts Medicine presented their research results at the International Association for Dance Medicine and Science (IADMS) 26th annual conference at the Hong Kong Academy of Performing Arts.

Susanna Piculell, a Swedish Physiotherapist working in private practice and with the Swedish Volleyball team, undertook research with the Royal Ballet into pre-seasonal screening and injury rates in classical ballet. Since graduating from UCL she has relocated to Sweden and integrated her gained knowledge and skills at Lunds Dans och Musikalgymnasium (a secondary school for dance and musical theatre students), Malmoe Academy of Music and Artists and Musicians health in Malmoe. Experiences from her MSc (including the many observations at the BAPAM clinic) have contributed not only to Susanna’s clinical work but also to new career opportunities. She is now also lecturing on ergonomics and healthy lifestyles for musicians.

Karolin Krell, Physiotherapist and Osteopath, works in private practice in London and regularly tours with the German National Rowing and Skeleton Team. She explored sleep and rest habits amongst performing artists during her MSc studies and presented her results during the science poster session in Hong Kong. Since completing her MSc she also practices on site at the London Contemporary Dance School and supported various circus and dance companies backstage to keep busy tour schedules rolling. Furthermore, Karolin is very eager and involved in the newly formed UK Osteopathic Performing Arts Care Association (OPACA), an interest group for osteopathic students and osteopaths involved or interested in the health care of performing artists.

Susanna and Karolin both share a passion to support and develop performing arts medicine and enjoyed the conference very much. IADMS strives to enhance the health, well-being, training and performance of dancers by ‘cultivating educational, medical and scientific excellence’. The meeting in Hong Kong proved to be a wonderful opportunity to exchange thoughts and ideas with dance medicine and science experts from all over the world. After four exciting days filled with seminars, poster presentations, movement sessions and social events (and tropical storms!) Susanna and Karolin returned inspired with new ideas for management and treatment approaches within the dance sector. Amongst many things, it was very beneficial to have the opportunity to network and connect with peers. Meeting other delegates from Finland and Sweden allowed Susanna to further develop collaboration between Scandinavian performing arts medicine practitioners. One idea is to arrange a smaller Scandinavian meeting in 2017 as an additional networking opportunity prior to the IADMS 28th meeting, which will be in Helsinki 2018.

Susanna and Karolin are very grateful in particular to the British Association of Performing Arts Medicine (BAPAM) and their supervisors that guided them though their studies at the University College London.

Susanna was winner of the BAPAM prize in 2015 for the UCL PAM MSc Research Project.

Both Susanna and Karolin received BAPAM Shipley-Rudge Research & Education Awards to support attendance at research conferences to present their MSc research during 2016. BAPAM is able to offer these awards thanks an annual donation from Dr Mike Shipley and Philip Rudge.

Music Technology Research

Friday, May 27th, 2016

Researchers at the Royal College of Music’s Centre for Performance Science are working on an international project to find out more about musicians’ use of technology.

The project, called TELMI, investigates new technologies to enhance the learning of musical instruments and develop new tools to increase efficiency, engagement, and healthy practice habits in musicians ranging from professionals to beginners.

All musicians aged 16 and over are invited to complete the following survey:

www.surveymonkey.com/r/TELMI-tech

BAPAM Training Day, May 21, Manchester

Wednesday, March 23rd, 2016

Saturday May 21, 09.30 – 16.30

Kraak – 11 Stevenson Square, Manchester M1 1DB

View Map

Click here to book your place now

Our Performing Arts Medicine Training Days are ideal for healthcare professionals and others engaged in performing arts welfare who want to develop their skills in this fascinating specialism.

Chantel McGregor, Guitar

The main theme of the forthcoming BAPAM Training Day is Guitar Playing.

This is a great opportunity to learn from peers, make connections and share unique insights. We’ll be joined by expert clinicians, researchers and professional guitarists to demonstrate playing and technique as well as join our Q&A panel.

The programme for the day is currently being finalised, but will include:

Morning session:

Dr Alan Watson, Reader in Anatomy, Cardiff University. Anatomy of the wrist, hand and fingers particularly in relation to guitar playing.

Virginia Whiteley, Physiotherapist, Leeds. Guitarists’ musculoskeletal problems and their treatment.

Dominique Royle, Physiotherapist, Cornwall. Self help strategies and injury prevention for guitarists.

Chantel McGregor, Rock guitarist. Practical demonstration of guitar playing and technique.

Afternoon session:

Closed session for BAPAM Clinicians (focus on Regional/AMABO doctors).

Parellel session -  Q&A with rock musicians on lifestyle issues.

Research presentations from students completing the MSc in Performing Arts Medicine at UCL.

Tickets cost £120

BAPAM Registered Practitioners: £90
BAPAM colleagues and Assessing Clinicians: £50
UCL Performing Arts Medicine students: Free

Click here to book your place now

If you prefer to book your place offline, please call us on 020 7404 5888.

Researching String Players’ Back Problems

Wednesday, February 24th, 2016

Kári Árnason is a physiotherapist who is currently studying for a Masters in Performing Arts Medicine at University College London. He is conducting a research project investigating the role of a certain muscle (lower trapezius), located between the shoulder blades, that is understood may play a role in neck, shoulder and upper back pain in viola, violin and cello players.

Kári hopes that this study will help to establish stronger rehabilitation methods and prevention measures for neck, shoulder and upper back injuries, which are very common in viola, violin and cello players. He is looking for adult viola, violin and cello players (professional musicians and music students), both with and without a history of neck, shoulder or upper back pain to participate.

If you would like to take part or find out more, please contact Kári directly at kariarna@gmail.com.

Participants will be asked to complete a questionnaire, especially designed to collect information about health-related problems in musicians and to undergo a clinical examination of the neck and shoulder which will utilise non-invasive, risk-free electromyography (EMG) measurements. This will take place in London.

This study has been approved by the UCL Research Ethics Committee

Event Report: BVA Rock & Pop Day, September 2015

Wednesday, September 30th, 2015

BAPAM Clinician, Dr Shareen Chua, reports from the British Voice Association (BVA) Interactive Rock & Pop Day, London, 13th September 2015. 

A quiet Sunday morning on Chiswick High Street – one man on his morning run, a dog with a tennis ball in its mouth and a woman driving an empty double decker bus. Through the entrance of a pub, empty tables, a smiling bartender, but beyond its courtyard, a large chattering crowd was audible. Vocal coaches, singers, songwriters, voice specialist Speech and Language Therapists, instrumentalists, voice rehabilitation specialists, voice researchers, performance coaches and consultant laryngologists, amongst all present at this event organised by the BVA. Also in attendance from BAPAM were Dr Frances Carter, Dr Miranda Godfrey & I.

At the start of the programme, Canadian singer songwriter, Selena Evangeline  took to stage to demonstrate the range and variety of vocal effects available to a solo live performer, in her case using vocal audio equipment by TC-Helicon.

Kim Chandler (vocal coach & lecturer) got our vocal cords going by getting us to attempt various vocal onsets, characterising them and offering suggestions on alternative ways of achieving particular sounds and reducing glottal stops.

Hearing loss associated with onstage noise was thereafter explored by John Rubin (Consultant ENT Surgeon, Royal National Throat, Nose and Ear Hospital). He spoke about various sound levels encountered within the music industry, covering a variety of sound monitors and hearing protection.

Two singers were subsequently brought on stage. In a live setting, Dane Chalfin, current President of the BVA, used song interpretation and emotion to offer them solutions that improved their technique and performance.

Tom Harris (Consultant Otolaryngologist) & Sara Harris (Speech and Language Therapist), no strangers to the realms of vocal health, engaged the audience in their talk about vocal nodules, with Sara Harris sharing several strategies and exercises that might be helpful in such an instance.

Applying the Primal Sound Model to an instantly familiar Pharrell Williams number, Craig Lees got everyone on our feet creating various vocal sounds, forming a Pop Choral group thus concluding the day’s programme – on a high note!

Although the BVA holds their Interactive Rock & Pop Day every two years, their Voice Clinics Forum will take place on Friday, 23 October 2015 at St Thomas’ Hospital, London SE1. The October event will cover topics such as the role of Voice Clinics in the NHS, training in laryngology for ENT surgeons, training for singing teachers involved with Voice Clinics and a discussion of ongoing research & audit papers on the aspect of voice or voice care in the UK.

BAPAM and the BVA are actively exploring opportunities to collaborate on future projects. Suggestions are welcome!

August 2015 Newsletter

Thursday, August 6th, 2015

Our August 2015 Newsletter focuses on our education and training work.

Did you know our Trainer Network delivers workshops in health, injury prevention and performance enhancement throughout the performing arts community?

Are you a healthcare practitioner or doctor interested in training and professional development with a focus on helping performing arts professionals overcome health problems affecting their ability to work and perform?

Find out more in our current Newsletter:

British Association for Performing Arts Medicine Newsletter August 2015

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