Posts Tagged ‘Performance Science’

Music Technology Research

Friday, May 27th, 2016

Researchers at the Royal College of Music’s Centre for Performance Science are working on an international project to find out more about musicians’ use of technology.

The project, called TELMI, investigates new technologies to enhance the learning of musical instruments and develop new tools to increase efficiency, engagement, and healthy practice habits in musicians ranging from professionals to beginners.

All musicians aged 16 and over are invited to complete the following survey:

www.surveymonkey.com/r/TELMI-tech

BAPAM Training Day, May 21, Manchester

Wednesday, March 23rd, 2016

Saturday May 21, 09.30 – 16.30

Kraak – 11 Stevenson Square, Manchester M1 1DB

View Map

Click here to book your place now

Our Performing Arts Medicine Training Days are ideal for healthcare professionals and others engaged in performing arts welfare who want to develop their skills in this fascinating specialism.

Chantel McGregor, Guitar

The main theme of the forthcoming BAPAM Training Day is Guitar Playing.

This is a great opportunity to learn from peers, make connections and share unique insights. We’ll be joined by expert clinicians, researchers and professional guitarists to demonstrate playing and technique as well as join our Q&A panel.

The programme for the day is currently being finalised, but will include:

Morning session:

Dr Alan Watson, Reader in Anatomy, Cardiff University. Anatomy of the wrist, hand and fingers particularly in relation to guitar playing.

Virginia Whiteley, Physiotherapist, Leeds. Guitarists’ musculoskeletal problems and their treatment.

Dominique Royle, Physiotherapist, Cornwall. Self help strategies and injury prevention for guitarists.

Chantel McGregor, Rock guitarist. Practical demonstration of guitar playing and technique.

Afternoon session:

Closed session for BAPAM Clinicians (focus on Regional/AMABO doctors).

Parellel session –  Q&A with rock musicians on lifestyle issues.

Research presentations from students completing the MSc in Performing Arts Medicine at UCL.

Tickets cost £120

BAPAM Registered Practitioners: £90
BAPAM colleagues and Assessing Clinicians: £50
UCL Performing Arts Medicine students: Free

Click here to book your place now

If you prefer to book your place offline, please call us on 020 7404 5888.

Researching String Players’ Back Problems

Wednesday, February 24th, 2016

Kári Árnason is a physiotherapist who is currently studying for a Masters in Performing Arts Medicine at University College London. He is conducting a research project investigating the role of a certain muscle (lower trapezius), located between the shoulder blades, that is understood may play a role in neck, shoulder and upper back pain in viola, violin and cello players.

Kári hopes that this study will help to establish stronger rehabilitation methods and prevention measures for neck, shoulder and upper back injuries, which are very common in viola, violin and cello players. He is looking for adult viola, violin and cello players (professional musicians and music students), both with and without a history of neck, shoulder or upper back pain to participate.

If you would like to take part or find out more, please contact Kári directly at kariarna@gmail.com.

Participants will be asked to complete a questionnaire, especially designed to collect information about health-related problems in musicians and to undergo a clinical examination of the neck and shoulder which will utilise non-invasive, risk-free electromyography (EMG) measurements. This will take place in London.

This study has been approved by the UCL Research Ethics Committee

Event Report: BVA Rock & Pop Day, September 2015

Wednesday, September 30th, 2015

BAPAM Clinician, Dr Shareen Chua, reports from the British Voice Association (BVA) Interactive Rock & Pop Day, London, 13th September 2015. 

A quiet Sunday morning on Chiswick High Street – one man on his morning run, a dog with a tennis ball in its mouth and a woman driving an empty double decker bus. Through the entrance of a pub, empty tables, a smiling bartender, but beyond its courtyard, a large chattering crowd was audible. Vocal coaches, singers, songwriters, voice specialist Speech and Language Therapists, instrumentalists, voice rehabilitation specialists, voice researchers, performance coaches and consultant laryngologists, amongst all present at this event organised by the BVA. Also in attendance from BAPAM were Dr Frances Carter, Dr Miranda Godfrey & I.

At the start of the programme, Canadian singer songwriter, Selena Evangeline  took to stage to demonstrate the range and variety of vocal effects available to a solo live performer, in her case using vocal audio equipment by TC-Helicon.

Kim Chandler (vocal coach & lecturer) got our vocal cords going by getting us to attempt various vocal onsets, characterising them and offering suggestions on alternative ways of achieving particular sounds and reducing glottal stops.

Hearing loss associated with onstage noise was thereafter explored by John Rubin (Consultant ENT Surgeon, Royal National Throat, Nose and Ear Hospital). He spoke about various sound levels encountered within the music industry, covering a variety of sound monitors and hearing protection.

Two singers were subsequently brought on stage. In a live setting, Dane Chalfin, current President of the BVA, used song interpretation and emotion to offer them solutions that improved their technique and performance.

Tom Harris (Consultant Otolaryngologist) & Sara Harris (Speech and Language Therapist), no strangers to the realms of vocal health, engaged the audience in their talk about vocal nodules, with Sara Harris sharing several strategies and exercises that might be helpful in such an instance.

Applying the Primal Sound Model to an instantly familiar Pharrell Williams number, Craig Lees got everyone on our feet creating various vocal sounds, forming a Pop Choral group thus concluding the day’s programme – on a high note!

Although the BVA holds their Interactive Rock & Pop Day every two years, their Voice Clinics Forum will take place on Friday, 23 October 2015 at St Thomas’ Hospital, London SE1. The October event will cover topics such as the role of Voice Clinics in the NHS, training in laryngology for ENT surgeons, training for singing teachers involved with Voice Clinics and a discussion of ongoing research & audit papers on the aspect of voice or voice care in the UK.

BAPAM and the BVA are actively exploring opportunities to collaborate on future projects. Suggestions are welcome!

August 2015 Newsletter

Thursday, August 6th, 2015

Our August 2015 Newsletter focuses on our education and training work.

Did you know our Trainer Network delivers workshops in health, injury prevention and performance enhancement throughout the performing arts community?

Are you a healthcare practitioner or doctor interested in training and professional development with a focus on helping performing arts professionals overcome health problems affecting their ability to work and perform?

Find out more in our current Newsletter:

British Association for Performing Arts Medicine Newsletter August 2015

To receive our Newsletters by email please sign up to our mailing list by entering your email address here and clicking send:

Event Report: PAMA Symposium 2015

Thursday, July 30th, 2015

BAPAM Registered physiotherapist, Patrice Berque, attended and presented at this year’s PAMA (Performing Arts Medicine Association) Symposium in Snowmass, Colorado, for the third time since 2010. BAPAM was pleased to help fund this trip with a Shipley Rudge Research and Education bursary. We are grateful to Patrice for providing this report:  


The conference started with a tribute to Alice Brandfonbrener who passed away last year. Alice was one of the founders of PAMA in the 1980s, along with Richard Lederman and Robert Sataloff. She was also the first editor of the journal devoted to Performing Arts Medicine: Medical Problems of Performing Artists.

For the first time in some years, the keynote lectures of this year’s conference were dealing with voice pathologies and problems of singers. Robert Sataloff, Professor of Otolaryngology, head and neck surgery at Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, and one of the pioneers of PAMA in the 1980s, gave two keynote lectures. The first dealt with common diagnoses and treatments in singers, with emphasis on the physical examination of the voice and larynx, and the issues around laryngitis and its treatment. The second lecture dealt with the aging voice of singers, giving an account of the anatomical and physiological changes affecting the aging vocal apparatus, and the adaptations that need to be considered to maintain performance. This not only involves medical treatment and surgery in some cases, but also intensive retraining (voice therapy) with a multidisciplinary team.

These lectures on the voice were complemented by two wonderful presentations by Matthias Echternach from the Freiburg Institute for Musicians’ Medicine, University of Music, Freiburg, Germany. Working in collaboration with Claudia Spahn from the same Institute, both Matthias and Claudia received the award for the “Richard Lederman Lectures”. Their work was presented by Matthias Echternach. The first lecture dealt with physiological insights for players of wind instruments, and was an observation of the physiology of playing a wind instrument, using endoscopy and real-time functional MRI (fMRI) with images taken at more than 20 frames per second. This technique made it possible to view an “fMRI video” of various wind players (horn, trumpet, clarinet, oboe, flute, recorder) and to observe the physiological processes of the respiratory system with the diaphragm and thoracic cage; and the actions the larynx, vocal folds, tongue, lips and velopharyngeal apparatus to maintain adequate seals and pressure while playing a wind instrument. A DVD of this talk is available on the following website for purchase: http://www.helblingchoral.com.  This DVD could be used as a teaching or retraining tool for wind players, who often have preconceived ideas on how the respiratory system works when playing a wind instrument. The second lecture from Matthias employed the same techniques, but dealt with singers, and showed the physiological mechanisms at play, involving subglottal pressure, the actions of the vocal cords and folds, and the adaptations of the vocal tract to perform different registers while singing. There were marked differences noted between the various registers of singers: baritone, male alto, tenor, soprano.

There were of course many other topics covered during the conference. One afternoon dealt with talks relating to the epidemiology and prevalence of performance-related musculoskeletal disorders (PRMDs) affecting musicians, including: an ongoing systematic review of incidence and prevalence by Christine Guptill, University of Toronto, Canada; my own presentation on the psychometric evaluation of the Musculoskeletal Pain Intensity and Interference Questionnaire for Musicians (MPIIQM), which is now available online as a user guide; the examination of risk factors, i.e. the impact of playing-time on frequency and severity of pain by Judith Robitaille, University of Sherbrooke, Quebec; an account on how to perform good scientific research in terms of the fundamental concepts in research methodology, presented by Ester Chou, University of Athens, Ohio.

Furthermore, research studies on various aspects of biomechanics and neurology were presented: the importance of mental imagery, involving the mirror neuron system (MNS) and the activation of several cortical areas during mental

practice, presented by Serap Bastepe-Gray, Peabody Conservatory, Baltimore; the biomechanics and timing of the left hand during “shifting” in violin performance using motion capture, presented by Peter Visentin, University of Lethbridge, Canada; an EMG study on the influence of different clarinet thumb-rest positions on right thumb loading, presented by Kathryn Young, Louisana State University; an needle EMG and fMRI case study of a pianist, showing that the hyperactivation of the muscles of the left dystonic hand of a piano player correlated with increased cortical activity in the contralateral primary sensorimotor cortex and supplementary motor area, presented by Sang-Hie Lee, University of South Florida.

Several workshops were organised this year, and made it possible for attendees to interact with presenters. These workshops covered techniques and exercises for singing; how to approach and treat performance anxiety; achieving an effortless violin technique; mindfulness to increase focus and concentration; the integration of voice and dance technique for the musical theatre performer; the use of a new technology, i.e. combined wireless EMG and motion capture technology

to record limb positions and movements simultaneously with muscle activity patterns, load and fatigue.

All in all, it was a very good conference, and next year’s conference will be held outside Aspen/Snowmass for the first time.

This may appeal to more Europeans, since the conference will be held in New York from 6-10 July 2016, a short flight away! Submit your abstract before 1st November 2015 if you want to present: http://www.artsmed.org.

June 2015 Newsletter

Wednesday, June 10th, 2015

Our June 2015  Newsletter  is now available to read or download in pdf format:

British Association for Performing Arts Medicine Newsletter June 2015

Contents:

I Can’t Go On! Managing Performance Anxiety
Directory of Practitioners Update
Training Day Summary
Piano Professional Magazine
Research Projects
Associate Medical Director Appointed
We’re Recruiting: Job Opportunity at BAPAM
Dr Kit Wynn Parry
Help Support Us

Research Investigates Dance Shoes

Tuesday, June 2nd, 2015

Lindsay Wallace, a dancer, physiotherapist and Performing Arts Medicine MSc researcher at University College London, is looking for female dancers (minimum 4 hours dance activity per week) to take part in her project investigating dance footwear. The project aims to help reduce dance injuries and protect dancers.

Female dancers, please fill in this survey.

Wednesday, April 22nd, 2015

Service data for 2014 is now available:

Activity & Feedback Report 2014

Providing one-to-one health advice through clinical consultations is BAPAM’s core activity.

The data in this report relates to our clinical activity for 2014 i.e. all Helpline registrations and appointments offered in BAPAM clinics throughout the UK. The information has been compiled from 2 main sources and reported as follows:

Section 1. BAPAM patient registration database (Microsoft Dynamics CRM): demographic and appointments data – primarily for new patients. These data are collected via telephone.

Section 2. Anonymous patient feedback (Survey Monkey web surveys): collected from new patients attending their first free assessment with each clinician they see during their contact with BAPAM. Additional anonymous followup information is also collected, and details are summarised at the end of the report.

Research into Sleep Disturbances amongst Performing Artists

Wednesday, April 1st, 2015

Karolin Krell, an osteopath and University College London MSc Student in Performing Arts Medicine, is inviting performing artists to take part in her research study into sleep disturbances in our industry.

Karolin’s research explores the relationship between performance practise and lifestyle issues, particularly sleep and rest habits in the performing arts community.

Information gathered from this research will be used to inform the development of performers’ education and training curriculums. Data could potentially be used to develop advice on rest and recovery times for various performer groups with the aim of helping them to reach their performance potential.

If you wish to take part, please complete the following anonymous survey which collects information regarding your performance, lifestyle and sleep habits. All data requested from you is included on the questionnaire; after completion you have no further obligations to this project. Please read the Participant Information Sheet for further details.

Click here to complete the Sleep Disturbances amongst Performing Artists Survey

The survey link will be closed at the end of May 2015. You can complete and submit the questionnaire at any time before the end of May but please do it as soon as possible.

We’ll share an update about the results of the study in future here and through our Newsletter which you can sign up to by entering your email address here and clicking send:

If you would like to receive medical advice on any of the issues raised in the questionnaire you should contact your GP or call the BAPAM Helpline (020 7404 8444) for further information.

This project has Research Ethics Committee approval from University College London.