Posts Tagged ‘Performance Science’

Activity and Feedback – January to June 2014

Thursday, October 9th, 2014

BAPAM is committed to excellence in providing care for performing arts professionals and students. Effective monitoring and feedback is vital to the delivery of our services. Our clinical activity also enables our development as a research hub in performing arts health and practice. Service data for the first 6 months of 2014 is now published.

The full report is available to read and download here.

The information has been compiled from 2 main sources:

1. BAPAM patient registration database demographic and appointments data.

2. Anonymous patient feedback (using Survey Monkey web surveys) collected from new patients attending their first free assessment at a BAPAM clinic.

Additional anonymous feedback information collected from our follow-up survey is also summarised.

BAPAM Training Day ‘Performance Matters: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Performers’ Practice, Health and Wellbeing’

Thursday, October 9th, 2014

SUNDAY 16th November, London

What is music performance?

The Royal College of Music will be our hosts for a day of discussion and exploratory sessions investigating many different aspects of performance.

Book your ticket here: https://bapamtraining.eventbrite.co.uk

Performance is commonly explored within a specific domain, such as music, dance, theatre or sport. Although increasingly researched and theorised by academics as an overarching phenomenon, the findings of such research are not always embraced by the experts whose domains are studied. In this BAPAM training day, we examine what performance means across apparently unrelated contexts in order to consider how insights from one domain illuminate practice in another. We draw on personal experience of the fields of surgery (Roger Kneebone) and music (Aaron Williamon), selected from numerous possible examples, in order to highlight similarities and differences between areas of practice which at first sight seem remote. On closer inspection, each can be seen as an embodied practice where much that is important lies beyond the reach of words and must be directly experienced to be apprehended. We then explore the implications of embodied practice for the health and wellbeing of performers. Here, we focus specifically on musical performance, discussing both the possibilities that embodied practice affords but also the range of challenges it presents in educational and professional contexts. Throughout, we highlight recent advances in simulation science as ways of understanding embodied practice better and facilitating more effective approaches to developing performance skills.

This event is part of a regular series of training days provided by the British Association for Performing Arts Medicine (BAPAM) for health professionals, researchers and practitioners interested in performer healthcare.

The day will be led by Aaron Williamon, Professor of Performance Science at the Royal College of Music (RCM) and  Roger Kneebone, Professor of Surgical Education at Imperial College London, and includes a demonstration of the Performance Simulator at the RCM Centre for Performance Science.

Click here to download the full schedule for the day.

Lunch is included in the ticket price.

Cancellations prior to 16 October will be refunded.

Book your ticket here: https://bapamtraining.eventbrite.co.uk

Newsletter August 2014

Wednesday, August 13th, 2014

The current BAPAM Newsletter (August 2014)  is now available to read or download in pdf format: BAPAM Newsletter August 2014

Contents:

BAPAM Journal

Pegasus Chamber Choir Fundraising Concert for BAPAM –  For the Fallen

BAPAM Training Day – What is Music Performance 

Clinics News

Musicians’ Dystonia Reseach at UCL Institute of Neurology

BAPAM Scotland Update

PRS for Music Members Benevolent Fund Support

New Patrons

New Staff

Fundraisers

Friends Scheme

BAPAM Journal Issue 2

Wednesday, July 23rd, 2014

Issue 2 of the BAPAM Journal, our free online resource and channel of communication for all those engaged with performing arts health, education and welfare, is now available to download here: BAPAM Journal Issue 2 – July 2014. Many thanks to all our contributors and those who have made a voluntary effort to assist with its production. Please consider supporting our work by becoming a Friend of BAPAM or making a one-off donation.

Contents include:

Interview with Professor Rodney Grahame on performing arts medicine and hypermobility

Work, Identity and Involuntary Musical Career Transition Jane Oakland

Playing-related Musculoskeletal Disorders in Flautists: A Pilot Study Investigating Risk Factors and Interventions that may Affect Outcomes
Dr Patricia Halliwell

The Impact of Hypermobility in the Finger Joints of Flautists Isobel Artigues-Cano

Biotensegrity and Cello-playing Felicity Vincent

The BAPAM Student Advocate Scheme: Reflections on a Health Promotion Initiative at the University of Leeds Naomi Norton

BAPAM Clinics: Learning from our Patients Deborah Charnock, Dan Hayhurst and Clare Hicks

Reflections on Contributing to the NICE Consultation Process on Developing the Guidelines for Social Anxiety Disorder Dr Carol Chapman

European Union Exchange Programme – An initiative to Encourage International Collaborations in Health Promotion Asmund Prytz

Book Review: The Alexander Technique for Musicians by Judith Kleinman and Peter Buckoke Alison Loram

Performing Arts Medicine MSc Student Hub

Student Advocate Scheme Update Naomi Norton

Previous Issues: 

BAPAM Journal Issue 1 June 2013

 

What is Performing Arts Medicine and Why is it Essential?

Tuesday, July 1st, 2014

Jennie Morton speaks with the BMJ about the challenges of treating performing artists and musicians, her work with the British Association of Performing Arts Medicine, and the crossover project with the american college of sports medicine (athletesandthearts.com).

Jennie Morton is a UCL Honorary Lecturer on the MSc in Performing Arts Medicine, and lectures for The British Association for Performing Arts Medicine, Dance UK and many performing arts schools and teaching organisations. She also co-runs a dance school in Tring, Hertfordshire, and is a faculty member of The Wells Summer School with Dancers of the Royal Ballet. She still performs as a professional singer with the Manhattan Music.

New BAPAM Performing Arts Medicine Clinic in Cambridge

Tuesday, June 3rd, 2014

Are you (or do you know) a performing arts professional or student with a work-related health problem?

Held monthly at West Road Concert Hall, one of the city’s premiere music venues, our new clinic in Cambridge is now taking bookings.

We’re delighted to be working with Dr Trish Halliwell, NHS GP and a graduate of the BAPAM/University College London MSc in Performing Arts Medicine.

BAPAM is a unique non-profit healthcare organisation supporting individual performing arts professionals and providing broader education and training. Our clinicians give free, confidential health advice focused on the unique challenges faced throughout a career in the performing arts, including during education and training. We help our patients manage their health and performance practice, including accessing appropriate care in their local NHS and referral to specialist practitioners.

Performing arts professionals work in a competitive, highly skilled and often poorly paid industry. Behind the scenes, the physical and psychological pressure can be tough, and many people experience health problems or injuries affecting their ability to work. Access to expert health advice and support can be crucial for long term wellbeing throughout such a demanding career.

Read more about our clinics here.

To register with BAPAM and book a free appointment please call our Helpline on 020 7404 8444.

Recovering Voices: The Transition from ‘injured’ to ‘well’

Wednesday, May 28th, 2014

British Voice Association AGM Study Day July 6th 2014

This study day will address what is meant by vocal injury, and how this affects professional voice users physically, professionally and emotionally. Leading representatives from the fields of Laryngology, Speech and Language Therapy, Singing Teaching/Voice Coaching and Performance Psychology will talk about their different roles in the rehabilitation process, how they determine and measure ‘injury’ and ‘recovery’ and how they communicate and work with clients to achieve a successful outcome.

Recovering Voices is suitable for Speech Therapists, Spoken Voice Teachers, Singing Teachers, Laryngologists and any others who work with developing or rehabilitating voices. It is also suitable for those who wish to have a deeper understanding of issues relating to voice recovery.

Speakers include:
Tori Burnay, (Voice Specialist Speech and Language Therapist, London)
Declan Costello, (Consultant Otolaryngologist, Birmingham)
Phoebe Eley, (Student and Performer, Birmingham)
Gillyanne Kayes, (Singing Teacher, Author and Researcher, Presteigne and London)
Karen O’Connor, (Performance Coach, Birmingham)

This day will also include the British Voice Association Annual General Meeting and the presentation of research papers from the selected finalists competing for the Van Lawrence Prize. The Prize will be awarded at the end of the day.

Adobe Acrobat - icon Download a Flyer

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Application forms can be completed & sent back to us at administrator@britishvoiceassociation.org.uk

Adobe Acrobat - icon Download a provisional Programme

Arrow Right View Programme as a web page

Please note: this event is not organised by BAPAM and we receive no income from it.

Creativity, Music and the Brain

Tuesday, March 11th, 2014

What is the role of music in UK society? What happens to our brains when we listen to music? Can music help to heal the brain in physical and mental disorders? What does the musician’s brain teach us about neuroplasticity? What can we learn from a composer such as Chopin and from modern composers and musicians? 

Creativity, music and the brain: The power of music over the mind is the Royal Society of Medicine’s AGM and annual dinner, held on Tuesday 13 May 2014

Early bird tickets are now on sale here, where you can also find all the details of this fascinating event.

Research: Binaural Beats and Traditional Warm-up in Singers

Wednesday, February 26th, 2014

Comparison of the effect of binaural beats and traditional warm-up upon the acoustic measures in singers of the eastern and western traditions.

University College London

Performing Arts Medicine

Singing Research

As part of the innovative MSc Performing Arts Medicine programme at University College London, Soniya Sharangpani is examining the effect of binaural beats upon the quality of voicing. She is looking for female classical singers from both eastern and western traditions to participate in the project.

Participants will be asked to sing a sustained note and a phrase, tuning their voice to a decided pitch, before and after listening to binaural beats for about 10-15 minutes. The jitter and shimmer will be recorded using EGG machine (electroglottography).

After a week participants will be called again. This time, instead of listening to the binaural beats, the singers will perform warm ups for 10-15 minutes.

If you are interested in taking part please contact Soniya directly by email: soniya.sharangpani@gmail.com for details and information sheet. All reasonable costs will be covered. The research will take place in London.

This study is approved by the UCL Research Ethics Committee. Participation is voluntary and you can leave the research at any time.

Music Mark: Playing Related Injuries in Elite Young Instrumental Musicians

Wednesday, February 26th, 2014

Sarah Upjohn, specialist physiotherapist, Doctorate student (the only chartered physiotherapist ever to be offered a place to do a Doctorate at Cambridge, to our knowledge!), and BAPAM Directory member, has written a fascinating article for the UK Association for Music Education, Music Mark.

Sarah’s unique perspective on playing related injuries in elite young instrumental musicians, garnered through her experience working with students at the Purcell School and research she is conducting for her Cambridge University Doctorate enable her to discuss the types of injuries encountered and how they relate to instruments played, clearly identify risk factors for playing related injury and implications for instrumental teachers, and suggest targeted injury prevention strategies.

We see many young musicians in our clinics who have never been given adequate injury prevention advice. In particular, this can lead to serious problems for students entering higher education, with the required increase in playing time, lifestyle changes and other pressures. It’s an issue that Sarah is doing great work to address.

We are very grateful to Sarah and to Music Mark for granting us permission to share the article. It is available here in pdf format: Playing Related Injuries in Elite Young Musicians – a Physiotherapist’s Perspective

This article was originally published in Music Mark’s termly magazine, available to all their members. Music Mark represent and support 99% of all Music Services and over 12,000 instrumental and classroom music teachers, music tutors, assistants plus consultants, advisers, inspectors and lecturers in Initial Teacher Education. See more at: http://www.musicmark.org.uk/who-we-are.

We hope to feature updates on Sarah’s work in future issues of the BAPAM Journal.