Posts Tagged ‘Performing Arts Medicine’

International Conference on Performing Arts Medicine (ICPAM) 2018

Wednesday, July 26th, 2017

BAPAM is pleased to be taking part in the forthcoming ICPAM Conference, which will be held 29 – 31 March 2018 in the Hague. Initiated by the Hague Medical Centre and Dutch Performing Arts Medicine Association, the conference brings an international perspective to both music and dance medicine. Collaborators include ASPAH, BAPAM, CeiMArs, CND,  DGfMM, DHF, IADMS, Médecine des Arts, ÖGfMM, PAMA, NIDMS, SMM, tamed and UNISA.

Intending to share state of the art medical scientific knowledge on the topics of dance, music, voice, hearing and mind, the organisers now welcome abstracts for oral presentations as well as poster presentations.

Abstract deadline: November 1st, 2017 23:59 CET

You can find out more and submit an abstract for ICPAM 2018 here.

Registration for the conference will open soon.

Free Performing Arts Medicine Learning Day London June 17

Friday, May 26th, 2017

Organised by the UCL Performing Arts Medicine MSc team, this free event takes place on Saturday 17 June at the Institute of Sports Medicine and Health in London. If you would like to attend please register by emailing dsis.performingarts@ucl.ac.uk.

1st PAM Day UK
17 June 2017
10am – 4pm

Full programme now published

Actor Bob Cryer Walks 100 Miles for BAPAM (and Werner Herzog)

Thursday, May 18th, 2017

Thanks very much to actor and writer Bob Cryer, who is about to walk 100 miles and donate funds raised to BAPAM.

You can read more about just why Bob is walking 100 miles (at the behest of film director Werner Herzog no less), and help us help performers beat work-related health problems here: Bob’s Herzog 100 Mile Walk

“I walk for several reasons, but chief among them has become the positive effect it’s had on my mental health. Life as an actor and writer can be incredibly rewarding and I consider myself very lucky to be able to spend my days pursuing a career in the arts, but it’s vagaries can often render you confused, stressed and isolated. Walking can help clear the mind and gain some perspective. On the whole, I feel like I’ve been spared some of the darker spirals that can take hold during a bout of black dog, but many others are not so fortunate.

A career in the arts, which is so reliant on self evaluation, self expression and self examination, can place a more targeted kind of burden on a person’s mental health. And when you consider that one in four people in the UK will experience mental health issues at some point their life, then consider what the effects are on those in the performing arts.

Yes, the highs are incredible but the lows are indelible”

The Foundations of Good Mental Health

Wednesday, May 10th, 2017

To coincide with Mental Health Awareness Week 2017,  BAPAM Registered psychologist and performance coach Dr Carol Chapman, writes for Spotlight with essential tips for actors (and all performers) on building good mental health and resilience.

Read the article here

Alison Loram Muscle Function Research Published

Friday, March 24th, 2017

Alison Loram is a BAPAM-registered Alexander Technique teacher with expertise in the technique’s application to performance and practice, and ergonomics of instrumental playing/singing. She is a graduate of UCL’s Performing Arts Medicine MSc, violinist and research scientist. Her current research work investigates muscle function and motor control, and strategies of changing habits associated with chronic pain, injury and performance limitation.

The first of the papers directly associated with this research has recently been published, and is open-access. You can read the paper here:

Proactive selective inhibition targeted at the neck muscles: this proximal constraint facilitates learning and regulates global control.

Other articles explaining and verifying the techniques used in the experiments and analysis have also been published. For example, the use of ultrasound imaging to determine the change in neck muscle activity was completely novel and so the method had to be set out, explained and the analyses processes, not just of the data but of the images themselves, had to be documented, peer-reviewed and published.

The technical paper Real-Time Ultrasound Segmentation, Analysis and Visualisation of Deep Cervical Muscle Structure is also open access.

Research Published into Ballet Dancers’ Experiences of Injury and Osteopathy

Friday, February 24th, 2017

Osteopath, Toby Pollard-Smith, has published his research into Professional ballet dancers’ experience of injury and osteopathic treatment in the UK  in the January 2017 issue of the Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies. BAPAM helped recruit participants for the project, which Toby undertook while training to be an osteopath.

Toby’s previous career as a professional ballet dancer contributed to his interest and expertise in treating dance injuries, and we were recently pleased to welcome him to our Directory of Practitioners. Toby, who is also a keen trumpet player, treats dancers, musicians and other performing artists in Ascot and Marlow. Find Toby Pollard-Smith on the BAPAM Directory.

YCAT Sounding Board – Health and Wellbeing for Performers

Wednesday, January 11th, 2017

YCAT Sounding Board is the new initiative from the Young Classical Artists Trust (YCAT) to create a leading professional training ground for a broad and diverse range of music graduates and students. YCAT’s fourth career development seminar tackles the vital issue of maintaining your physical and mental wellbeing as a performer. BAPAM trainer, Jane Oakland, a music psychologist and vocal consultant, will be joining the panel to discuss issues around physical and mental wellbeing for those working in performance, and provide techniques to prevent and overcome these issues should they arise. This is a great opportunity to ask questions and discuss the challenges and benefits to all performers in engaging with this essential element of a balanced musical life.

Panel:

Matthew Jones – violist and performance health expert

Jane Oakland – BAPAM registered music psychologist and vocal consultant

Aaron Williamon – Professor of Performance Science, Royal College of Music

Time and Location: Tuesday 24th January – Royal Overseas League, London
Panel discussion: 1 hour
Q&A: 30 mins
Post-seminar: drinks and networking
Cost: £5

All welcome! Tickets are limited. 

Book your tickets here.

 

Dancers Study

Wednesday, November 23rd, 2016

A new international study explores the relationship between physical activity, including dancing, other risk factors (such as diet), and health.

The National Institute of Dance Medicine and Science and the Centre for Sport, Exercise and Osteoarthritis are investigating the long-term effect of these factors and their relation to the risk of disease, including osteoarthritis.

The team are asking participants to complete an online questionnaire, which is anonymous. Taking part is entirely voluntary and if you wish to do so, you are free to withdraw at any time. If you agree to continue you will be asked to complete two more questionnaires which will enable the researchers to get an understanding of how much physical activity/dancing you do and the effects on your overall health, including your lower body joints

The deadline for participation is the 31st of March 2017.

An optional prize draw is available for those who wish to enter.

The link to access the survey is: https://nottingham.onlinesurveys.ac.uk/dance

Performing Arts Medicine Graduates at IADMS Conference in Hong Kong

Tuesday, November 8th, 2016

We are delighted that two of our Performing Arts Medicine graduates from the University College London Master’s degree in Performing Arts Medicine presented their research results at the International Association for Dance Medicine and Science (IADMS) 26th annual conference at the Hong Kong Academy of Performing Arts.

Susanna Piculell, a Swedish Physiotherapist working in private practice and with the Swedish Volleyball team, undertook research with the Royal Ballet into pre-seasonal screening and injury rates in classical ballet. Since graduating from UCL she has relocated to Sweden and integrated her gained knowledge and skills at Lunds Dans och Musikalgymnasium (a secondary school for dance and musical theatre students), Malmoe Academy of Music and Artists and Musicians health in Malmoe. Experiences from her MSc (including the many observations at the BAPAM clinic) have contributed not only to Susanna’s clinical work but also to new career opportunities. She is now also lecturing on ergonomics and healthy lifestyles for musicians.

Karolin Krell, Physiotherapist and Osteopath, works in private practice in London and regularly tours with the German National Rowing and Skeleton Team. She explored sleep and rest habits amongst performing artists during her MSc studies and presented her results during the science poster session in Hong Kong. Since completing her MSc she also practices on site at the London Contemporary Dance School and supported various circus and dance companies backstage to keep busy tour schedules rolling. Furthermore, Karolin is very eager and involved in the newly formed UK Osteopathic Performing Arts Care Association (OPACA), an interest group for osteopathic students and osteopaths involved or interested in the health care of performing artists.

Susanna and Karolin both share a passion to support and develop performing arts medicine and enjoyed the conference very much. IADMS strives to enhance the health, well-being, training and performance of dancers by ‘cultivating educational, medical and scientific excellence’. The meeting in Hong Kong proved to be a wonderful opportunity to exchange thoughts and ideas with dance medicine and science experts from all over the world. After four exciting days filled with seminars, poster presentations, movement sessions and social events (and tropical storms!) Susanna and Karolin returned inspired with new ideas for management and treatment approaches within the dance sector. Amongst many things, it was very beneficial to have the opportunity to network and connect with peers. Meeting other delegates from Finland and Sweden allowed Susanna to further develop collaboration between Scandinavian performing arts medicine practitioners. One idea is to arrange a smaller Scandinavian meeting in 2017 as an additional networking opportunity prior to the IADMS 28th meeting, which will be in Helsinki 2018.

Susanna and Karolin are very grateful in particular to the British Association of Performing Arts Medicine (BAPAM) and their supervisors that guided them though their studies at the University College London.

Susanna was winner of the BAPAM prize in 2015 for the UCL PAM MSc Research Project.

Both Susanna and Karolin received BAPAM Shipley-Rudge Research & Education Awards to support attendance at research conferences to present their MSc research during 2016. BAPAM is able to offer these awards thanks an annual donation from Dr Mike Shipley and Philip Rudge.

Musician’s Focal Dystonia Factsheet

Wednesday, November 2nd, 2016

Download our new Musician’s Focal Dystonia Factsheet here.

Dystonia is a neurological condition that causes involuntary muscle spasm leading to abnormal movements. While they are unlikely to encounter this condition, musicians may develop a rare form of task-specific dystonia known as ‘Musician’s Focal Dystonia (MFD)’. Most cases of MFD affect the upper limb (hands, fingers, wrist or forearm) in guitarists, pianists and string players. However, brass or wind players may also experience MFD in the hands and in areas relating to embouchure (mouth, lips, cheeks, jaw or tongue). Percussionists may develop dystonia in the foot.

To meet the need for guidance about Musician’s Focal Dystonia, we have developed our new Factsheet in partnership with the Association for British Orchestras (ABO) and the Musicians’ Union (MU). The Factsheet provides a brief overview of symptoms and possible risk factors, and suggestions for prevention and management plus advice for employers, including orchestra managers, and sources of further advice and support.

This publication was produced in consultation with our Dystonia Advisory Group: Dr Rebecca Whiticar (Chair), Dr Deborah Charnock, Dr David Fielding, Dr Mike Shipley, Dan Hayhurst (BAPAM); Dawn Day (ABO); Diane Widdison (MU); Katherine Butler (Clinical Specialist in Hand Therapy); Dr Mark Edwards (Consultant Neurologist); Mr John White (Upper limb orthopaedic surgeon).

We are extremely pleased to have collaborated with the ABO and BAPAM on producing this guidance which we hope will be useful to both musicians and the engagers of musicians. Although FD is relatively rare we know that being able to access the correct information for diagnosis and pathways to treatments is invaluable to the musicians that are affected. We hope that the guidance, that has had input from the top medical specialists in the field, helps contribute to the increased awareness of FD in musicians - Diane Widdison, Musicians’ Union National Organiser – Education and Training

Download our Musician’s Focal Dystonia Factsheet here.