Posts Tagged ‘Performing Arts’

Mental Health and Wellbeing Services for Performing Artists: Guidance for the Performing Arts Sector

Tuesday, July 30th, 2019

Consultation Paper

BAPAM is pleased to have brought together a working group of clinicians and performing arts organisations interested in addressing challenges to the mental health and wellbeing of those who work in the sector. The group has produced guidance to support the development and delivery of services specifically for performing arts professionals and students. The guidance is designed to be used by:

• organisations commissioning or wishing to commission mental health services for performing artists

• organisations and practitioners providing mental health and wellbeing services for performing artists

• education providers offering mental health and wellbeing support to students

• individuals and agencies wishing to support best practice for performing artists

• performers and other performing arts professionals wishing to understand the standard of practice they can expect from services.

This guidance has been developed by BAPAM’s Psychosocial Working Group. We aim to make a real difference to the quality of services available. The purpose of the group is to provide a forum in which approaches to prevention, care and support can be discussed, and clinical leadership can be provided for developing and maintaining an evidence-based service designed to support performing arts professionals and students with vocation-related mental health issues. The group has drawn on the clinical evidence base, including National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE) guidelines, which contain reviews of published evidence for healthcare interventions from clinical and cost-effectiveness perspectives, to produce this guidance for the performing arts sector. There are seven key areas of focus:

1. Preventing Mental Health Problems
2. Early Clinical Assessment
3. Brief Intervention
4. Peer Support
5. Ensure Links with the NHS
6. Multi-disciplinary Team Approach
7. Managing a Crisis

We are publishing this paper for consultation and welcome all comments which will be considered prior to the final launch.

Read or download the paper here:

Mental Health and Wellbeing Services for Performing Artists: Guidance for the Performing Arts Sector – A Consultation Paper

Comments can be posted via the online survey here: https://www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/NKRFVGD

The consultation is open until 15 September 2019.

Psychosocial Practitioner Peer Supervision Group

Wednesday, March 27th, 2019

BAPAM is pleased to support the Peer Supervision Group for psychosocial practitioners who work with performing arts clients.

This group, whose inaugural meetings took place in 2018, opens up the conversation between performing arts and psychological practice. It is developing a growing professional network for counselling, coaching and psychology practitioners who work with performing artists of all kinds. The group meets regularly, roughly every 8 weeks, in central London.

As well as discussing clinical cases and case issues, there is interactive exploration, mutual consultation and support on more general professional practice issues, including ethical issues, boundary and confidentiality areas. Such exchanges of expertise and experience enable members to reflect on and refine best practice in working with performers. The Group offers members the chance to share specialist expertise of particular problem areas and to provide interventions, guidance, information and professional support within a rigorous evidence-based practice and practice-based evidence framework in this developing field. The Group acts as a forum not only for encouraging and developing the highest standards of practice but also for identifying, promoting and supporting new research in the field.

Members of the group use a variety of approaches and come from a range of career backgrounds. Some members bring specialist expertise within the field, for example, working with people in particular arts professions or with certain types of problem. The Group is sensitive to BAME, LGBT+ and other dimensions of difference.

It is hoped that specialised supervision of this type will become available and accessible to many more practitioners on the BAPAM Directory and the Group is keen to encourage this in whatever ways it can. Members are happy to offer advice and suggestions to practitioners wanting to start their own peer supervision group and to find ways of welcoming practitioners new to the Directory to join.

Practitioners interested in finding out more, joining the London group or starting a group of their own are invited to contact Dr Carol Chapman by email at carol@carolchapman.co.uk

New BAPAM Clinics

Tuesday, February 5th, 2019

We now hold free Performing Arts Medicine clinics in London, Glasgow, Birmingham, Cardiff and Leeds. 

If you make a proportion of your living from, or study in the performing arts, and have a health problem related to your work, we can help you.

Our clinicians are experienced at dealing with the problems performing arts workers frequently face, and can help with an accurate diagnosis and advice including identifying efficient care pathways, both in the NHS and from other specialist individuals and services. The BAPAM team can also advise about the availability of financial support for people experiencing health problems affecting their ability to work or study.

To make an appointment, give us a call on 020 7404 8444.

The Music Commission: Opportunities and Barriers to Progressing in Music

Wednesday, May 2nd, 2018

The Music Commission, supported by ABRSM, has launched its first call for public evidence, with a survey containing a series of specific questions around progress in the development of a musical life. Taking part enables all voices to be heard, so if you are involved in music education – as a music leader, teacher, learner, or consumer – The Music Commission would like to hear from you!

Have you found abundant opportunities to develop your musical practice or have there been barriers to participation in musical life? What are your positive and negative experiences of learning and work environments, your peers in the arts community, teachers, employers, media, access to venues and rehearsal space,  housing, earning a living or supporting yourself through university? Perhaps you have you encountered health problems that have been a barrier to progress – there are significant physical and psychological demands placed on music students and professionals, which can be eased or exacerbated by social factors.

Please take the survey here.

The Music Commission is also asking organisations within the music sector to run focus groups, an initiative you can find out about here: Let’s Talk Music. The questions are modeled on the online survey.  How the discussions take place and in what context however, are entirely up to the organisation hosting them. The aim of the group is to discuss questions and then to put together a collaborative statement which draws on the thoughts, feelings and opinions of the group.  This can be submitted in writing, or using recordings, video content or images.

 

BAPAM Director Appointed

Thursday, December 7th, 2017

We are delighted to welcome our new Director, Claire Cordeaux

Having started her career as a youth and community worker over 30 years ago, Claire Cordeaux has worked in the private and voluntary sectors, social care and the NHS, covering early years and children’s services, workforce development, health strategy, research and innovation at international, regional and local levels. In addition to a language degree, Claire holds a Masters in Research and Postgraduate Diplomas in Public Sector Management and Youth and Community work. Prior to her current role, Claire was Healthcare Director of SIMUL8 Corporation, working globally to improve healthcare using computer modelling and simulation. Claire is an active musician in a Celtic folk fusion band, and has supported a number of arts initiatives and festivals from youth music projects to running a boat stage to connect performers in coastal areas.  Now Director of the British Association for Performing Arts Medicine, Claire counts herself as very lucky to have a role which combines her two passions of health improvement and performing arts.

Osteopathic Performing Arts Care Association Study Day

Wednesday, March 29th, 2017

The Osteopathic Performing Arts Care Association (OPACA) are a group of osteopaths who have a special interest in the care of performers. Members include BAPAM registered osteopaths Michael Mehta, Karolin Krell, Nikki Ellis, David Propert, Alison Judah, Toby Pollard-Smith and Lazarus Nono.

Presented by dancer and choreographer, Russel Maliphant, and Osteopath, Andrew ferguson, the first OPACA Symposium and study day, The Dancer’s Body: Integrity and Fluidity, will be held on Saturday May 6th at the General Osteopathic Council in London.

Find out more here.

January 2017 Newsletter

Friday, January 20th, 2017

2017 is off to a flying start here at BAPAM, and we already have some great events to share. Our Training Day on May 20 focuses on Anxiety. YCAT’s next Sounding Board event for performers covers health and wellbeing and features BAPAM Trainer, Jane Oakland. On March 17, Graham Fitch gives a performance of Bach’s Goldberg Variations in support of BAPAM. We also have news of our next Induction Day, which is open to all – an introduction to the field of performing arts medicine and a great way to find out more about our work and how you could get involved.

Read our January 2017 Newsletter here.

If you’d like to subscribe to our Newsletter please add your name and email address here. We don’t share your information with anyone else.

 

2015 Annual Review

Thursday, July 21st, 2016

How do we help artists & creators?

Our 2015 Annual Review is now published. Read it here.

Like athletes, performing artists need to be as healthy as possible, yet are constantly at risk of injury and illness. In some ways performers are more vulnerable – risking muscle damage, hearing difficulties, voice loss, severe stress and anxiety. Yet unlike sportspeople, their health problems are largely unrecognised, so that if they get sick, they struggle to find health practitioners who really understand their needs.

BAPAM has been helping performers since 1984. We have in-depth understanding of their work-related health problems. We also appreciate the financial and other career pressures they are under. Our services are unique, essential and irreplaceable – they save careers and enable Britain to maintain its top class performing arts scene.

It is excellent to receive such an expert service, especially as I am a musician of limited financial ability. I have been strongly reassured and leave here very happy that I can keep playing

I have used your services before and always had a good experience. I was remembered by the staff and felt so welcomed back. I have only great things to say about BAPAM. It’s such a valuable service to professionals

The clinician was very warm and knowledgeable about how my condition relates to the wideranging demands of my work as a community musician. Lots of time and consideration given to ensure I understand the nature of my difficulties and the steps I should take to resolve them

Event Report: BVA Rock & Pop Day, September 2015

Wednesday, September 30th, 2015

BAPAM Clinician, Dr Shareen Chua, reports from the British Voice Association (BVA) Interactive Rock & Pop Day, London, 13th September 2015. 

A quiet Sunday morning on Chiswick High Street – one man on his morning run, a dog with a tennis ball in its mouth and a woman driving an empty double decker bus. Through the entrance of a pub, empty tables, a smiling bartender, but beyond its courtyard, a large chattering crowd was audible. Vocal coaches, singers, songwriters, voice specialist Speech and Language Therapists, instrumentalists, voice rehabilitation specialists, voice researchers, performance coaches and consultant laryngologists, amongst all present at this event organised by the BVA. Also in attendance from BAPAM were Dr Frances Carter, Dr Miranda Godfrey & I.

At the start of the programme, Canadian singer songwriter, Selena Evangeline  took to stage to demonstrate the range and variety of vocal effects available to a solo live performer, in her case using vocal audio equipment by TC-Helicon.

Kim Chandler (vocal coach & lecturer) got our vocal cords going by getting us to attempt various vocal onsets, characterising them and offering suggestions on alternative ways of achieving particular sounds and reducing glottal stops.

Hearing loss associated with onstage noise was thereafter explored by John Rubin (Consultant ENT Surgeon, Royal National Throat, Nose and Ear Hospital). He spoke about various sound levels encountered within the music industry, covering a variety of sound monitors and hearing protection.

Two singers were subsequently brought on stage. In a live setting, Dane Chalfin, current President of the BVA, used song interpretation and emotion to offer them solutions that improved their technique and performance.

Tom Harris (Consultant Otolaryngologist) & Sara Harris (Speech and Language Therapist), no strangers to the realms of vocal health, engaged the audience in their talk about vocal nodules, with Sara Harris sharing several strategies and exercises that might be helpful in such an instance.

Applying the Primal Sound Model to an instantly familiar Pharrell Williams number, Craig Lees got everyone on our feet creating various vocal sounds, forming a Pop Choral group thus concluding the day’s programme – on a high note!

Although the BVA holds their Interactive Rock & Pop Day every two years, their Voice Clinics Forum will take place on Friday, 23 October 2015 at St Thomas’ Hospital, London SE1. The October event will cover topics such as the role of Voice Clinics in the NHS, training in laryngology for ENT surgeons, training for singing teachers involved with Voice Clinics and a discussion of ongoing research & audit papers on the aspect of voice or voice care in the UK.

BAPAM and the BVA are actively exploring opportunities to collaborate on future projects. Suggestions are welcome!

August 2015 Newsletter

Thursday, August 6th, 2015

Our August 2015 Newsletter focuses on our education and training work.

Did you know our Trainer Network delivers workshops in health, injury prevention and performance enhancement throughout the performing arts community?

Are you a healthcare practitioner or doctor interested in training and professional development with a focus on helping performing arts professionals overcome health problems affecting their ability to work and perform?

Find out more in our current Newsletter:

British Association for Performing Arts Medicine Newsletter August 2015

To receive our Newsletters by email please sign up to our mailing list by entering your email address here and clicking send: