Posts Tagged ‘Physiotherapy’

BAPAM Physiotherapist Supports Team GB at World Games

Wednesday, July 19th, 2017

The 2017 World Games commence in Wroclaw, Poland on July 20th, and we wish the very best of luck to the Team GB athletes and BAPAM physiotherapist, Louise Curley who returns to her role supporting gymnasts, acrobats and tumblers as the British Gymnastics Delegation Physiotherapist.

Here at BAPAM, Louise gives expert help to musicians, actors, dancers, circus and physical performers, providing free physiotherapy assessments and subsidised, affordable follow up sessions at our London clinic. She also runs her own practice Rejuven8 Physiotherapy in Warwickshire.

Prevalence Study: Musculoskeletal Problems in Professional Orchestra Musicians in Scotland

Thursday, July 7th, 2016

Patrice Berque (a BAPAM-registered physiotherapist based in Glasgow) has contributed a paper relating to the prevalence of PRMPs (Playing-Related Musculoskeletal Problems) among professional orchestra musicians in Scotland to the journal Medical Problems of Performing Artists (MPPA).

This study is the first prevalence study among professional musicians in Scotland, and one of very few in the UK. It shows the prevalence rates of PRMPs among the three orchestras that took part in this study.

A poster summarises the main results of this study. This poster will be presented at IFOMPT 2016, the World Congress of Musculoskeletal Physiotherapy on 8th July in Glasgow at the SECC.

The MPIIQM questionnaire, developed and validated prior to this study, is also available for download from Patrice’s webpage and may be used as a screening tool for injury prevention to measure pain prevalence of PRMPs.

BAPAM Training Day, May 21, Manchester

Wednesday, March 23rd, 2016

Saturday May 21, 09.30 – 16.30

Kraak – 11 Stevenson Square, Manchester M1 1DB

View Map

Click here to book your place now

Our Performing Arts Medicine Training Days are ideal for healthcare professionals and others engaged in performing arts welfare who want to develop their skills in this fascinating specialism.

Chantel McGregor, Guitar

The main theme of the forthcoming BAPAM Training Day is Guitar Playing.

This is a great opportunity to learn from peers, make connections and share unique insights. We’ll be joined by expert clinicians, researchers and professional guitarists to demonstrate playing and technique as well as join our Q&A panel.

The programme for the day is currently being finalised, but will include:

Morning session:

Dr Alan Watson, Reader in Anatomy, Cardiff University. Anatomy of the wrist, hand and fingers particularly in relation to guitar playing.

Virginia Whiteley, Physiotherapist, Leeds. Guitarists’ musculoskeletal problems and their treatment.

Dominique Royle, Physiotherapist, Cornwall. Self help strategies and injury prevention for guitarists.

Chantel McGregor, Rock guitarist. Practical demonstration of guitar playing and technique.

Afternoon session:

Closed session for BAPAM Clinicians (focus on Regional/AMABO doctors).

Parellel session -  Q&A with rock musicians on lifestyle issues.

Research presentations from students completing the MSc in Performing Arts Medicine at UCL.

Tickets cost £120

BAPAM Registered Practitioners: £90
BAPAM colleagues and Assessing Clinicians: £50
UCL Performing Arts Medicine students: Free

Click here to book your place now

If you prefer to book your place offline, please call us on 020 7404 5888.

BIMM/SOMM Joint Winter Symposium

Thursday, October 1st, 2015

The British Institute of Musculoskeletal Medicine (BIMM) and the Society of Musculoskeletal Medicine (SOMM) is proud to announce a Combined Symposium: Challenging Joints: Management of laxity, instability and hypermobility, taking place in Birmingham on Saturday, the 14th of November 2015. A number of experts and highly reputed speakers will cover the medical, surgical, and therapeutic aspect of the condition. There will be a variety of interactive workshops providing an insight into the practical considerations of the condition. The day will also offer a great opportunity to network and exchange ideas and knowledge with other members of the professions.

For further information please take a look at the event page over at the BIMM website: Challenging Joints: Management of Laxity Instability and Hypermobility

Saturday 14th November 2015
Jury’s Inn, Birmingham City Centre

A great resource for anyone interested in musculoskeletal disorders, BIMM’s education programme of  short courses and workshops on various aspects of musculoskeletal medicine is ongoing. Forthcoming events include:

Soft Tissue Examination & Injection Roadshow: 4th November 2015

Chronic Pain Management: 21st – 23rd November 2015

Event Report: PAMA Symposium 2015

Thursday, July 30th, 2015

BAPAM Registered physiotherapist, Patrice Berque, attended and presented at this year’s PAMA (Performing Arts Medicine Association) Symposium in Snowmass, Colorado, for the third time since 2010. BAPAM was pleased to help fund this trip with a Shipley Rudge Research and Education bursary. We are grateful to Patrice for providing this report:  


The conference started with a tribute to Alice Brandfonbrener who passed away last year. Alice was one of the founders of PAMA in the 1980s, along with Richard Lederman and Robert Sataloff. She was also the first editor of the journal devoted to Performing Arts Medicine: Medical Problems of Performing Artists.

For the first time in some years, the keynote lectures of this year’s conference were dealing with voice pathologies and problems of singers. Robert Sataloff, Professor of Otolaryngology, head and neck surgery at Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, and one of the pioneers of PAMA in the 1980s, gave two keynote lectures. The first dealt with common diagnoses and treatments in singers, with emphasis on the physical examination of the voice and larynx, and the issues around laryngitis and its treatment. The second lecture dealt with the aging voice of singers, giving an account of the anatomical and physiological changes affecting the aging vocal apparatus, and the adaptations that need to be considered to maintain performance. This not only involves medical treatment and surgery in some cases, but also intensive retraining (voice therapy) with a multidisciplinary team.

These lectures on the voice were complemented by two wonderful presentations by Matthias Echternach from the Freiburg Institute for Musicians’ Medicine, University of Music, Freiburg, Germany. Working in collaboration with Claudia Spahn from the same Institute, both Matthias and Claudia received the award for the “Richard Lederman Lectures”. Their work was presented by Matthias Echternach. The first lecture dealt with physiological insights for players of wind instruments, and was an observation of the physiology of playing a wind instrument, using endoscopy and real-time functional MRI (fMRI) with images taken at more than 20 frames per second. This technique made it possible to view an “fMRI video” of various wind players (horn, trumpet, clarinet, oboe, flute, recorder) and to observe the physiological processes of the respiratory system with the diaphragm and thoracic cage; and the actions the larynx, vocal folds, tongue, lips and velopharyngeal apparatus to maintain adequate seals and pressure while playing a wind instrument. A DVD of this talk is available on the following website for purchase: http://www.helblingchoral.com.  This DVD could be used as a teaching or retraining tool for wind players, who often have preconceived ideas on how the respiratory system works when playing a wind instrument. The second lecture from Matthias employed the same techniques, but dealt with singers, and showed the physiological mechanisms at play, involving subglottal pressure, the actions of the vocal cords and folds, and the adaptations of the vocal tract to perform different registers while singing. There were marked differences noted between the various registers of singers: baritone, male alto, tenor, soprano.

There were of course many other topics covered during the conference. One afternoon dealt with talks relating to the epidemiology and prevalence of performance-related musculoskeletal disorders (PRMDs) affecting musicians, including: an ongoing systematic review of incidence and prevalence by Christine Guptill, University of Toronto, Canada; my own presentation on the psychometric evaluation of the Musculoskeletal Pain Intensity and Interference Questionnaire for Musicians (MPIIQM), which is now available online as a user guide; the examination of risk factors, i.e. the impact of playing-time on frequency and severity of pain by Judith Robitaille, University of Sherbrooke, Quebec; an account on how to perform good scientific research in terms of the fundamental concepts in research methodology, presented by Ester Chou, University of Athens, Ohio.

Furthermore, research studies on various aspects of biomechanics and neurology were presented: the importance of mental imagery, involving the mirror neuron system (MNS) and the activation of several cortical areas during mental

practice, presented by Serap Bastepe-Gray, Peabody Conservatory, Baltimore; the biomechanics and timing of the left hand during “shifting” in violin performance using motion capture, presented by Peter Visentin, University of Lethbridge, Canada; an EMG study on the influence of different clarinet thumb-rest positions on right thumb loading, presented by Kathryn Young, Louisana State University; an needle EMG and fMRI case study of a pianist, showing that the hyperactivation of the muscles of the left dystonic hand of a piano player correlated with increased cortical activity in the contralateral primary sensorimotor cortex and supplementary motor area, presented by Sang-Hie Lee, University of South Florida.

Several workshops were organised this year, and made it possible for attendees to interact with presenters. These workshops covered techniques and exercises for singing; how to approach and treat performance anxiety; achieving an effortless violin technique; mindfulness to increase focus and concentration; the integration of voice and dance technique for the musical theatre performer; the use of a new technology, i.e. combined wireless EMG and motion capture technology

to record limb positions and movements simultaneously with muscle activity patterns, load and fatigue.

All in all, it was a very good conference, and next year’s conference will be held outside Aspen/Snowmass for the first time.

This may appeal to more Europeans, since the conference will be held in New York from 6-10 July 2016, a short flight away! Submit your abstract before 1st November 2015 if you want to present: http://www.artsmed.org.

Music Mark: Playing Related Injuries in Elite Young Instrumental Musicians

Wednesday, February 26th, 2014

Sarah Upjohn, specialist physiotherapist, Doctorate student (the only chartered physiotherapist ever to be offered a place to do a Doctorate at Cambridge, to our knowledge!), and BAPAM Directory member, has written a fascinating article for the UK Association for Music Education, Music Mark.

Sarah’s unique perspective on playing related injuries in elite young instrumental musicians, garnered through her experience working with students at the Purcell School and research she is conducting for her Cambridge University Doctorate enable her to discuss the types of injuries encountered and how they relate to instruments played, clearly identify risk factors for playing related injury and implications for instrumental teachers, and suggest targeted injury prevention strategies.

We see many young musicians in our clinics who have never been given adequate injury prevention advice. In particular, this can lead to serious problems for students entering higher education, with the required increase in playing time, lifestyle changes and other pressures. It’s an issue that Sarah is doing great work to address.

We are very grateful to Sarah and to Music Mark for granting us permission to share the article. It is available here in pdf format: Playing Related Injuries in Elite Young Musicians – a Physiotherapist’s Perspective

This article was originally published in Music Mark’s termly magazine, available to all their members. Music Mark represent and support 99% of all Music Services and over 12,000 instrumental and classroom music teachers, music tutors, assistants plus consultants, advisers, inspectors and lecturers in Initial Teacher Education. See more at: http://www.musicmark.org.uk/who-we-are.

We hope to feature updates on Sarah’s work in future issues of the BAPAM Journal.

 

New Performing Arts Medicine Directory Practitioners

Monday, April 8th, 2013

We’re pleased to welcome these new members of the BAPAM Directory of Performing Arts Medicine Practitioners:

Rachel Brockhurst, Massage Therapist, London E2

Liz Ebelthite, Physiotherapist, Marple, Stockport

Derek Climpson, Essex based Alexander Technique/Acupuncture practitioner

Dr Anita Nathan, GP, Performing Arts Medicine clinics at BAPAM, London

Isabel Artigues Cano, Physiotherapist, London

Janet Wright, Alexander Technique, Cornwall

The BAPAM Directory lists clinical specialists and practitioners in many branches of healthcare who are experienced working with performing artists. We check that everyone listed is qualified, insured and has relevant experience. We are grateful for any feedback you may have about practitioners you have seen. Please email admin@bapam.org.uk if you wish to contact us.

BVA Study Day – How the Breath Inspires

Wednesday, August 15th, 2012

Experts including Alan Watson (The Biology of Musical Performance), Jeannette Nelson (Head of Voice, National Theatre) and Ed Blake (specialist physiotherapist) investigate the physiology of breathing. How does the mechanism of breathing relate to speech and singing?

How the Breath Inspires – the next British Voice Association Study Day, on Sunday 23rd September 2012, covers anatomy, physiology and function, and practical applications for voice, both spoken and sung. Workshop sessions explore links between breathing and voice.

Full programme and booking form here.

Patrice Berque wins Movement Research Award

Wednesday, January 4th, 2012

Physiotherapist and former professional horn player, Patrice Berque, has been awarded the Susanne Klein-Vogelbach Special Award 2011 for his paper, A combination of constraint-induced therapy and motor control retraining and motor control retraining in the treatment of focal hand dystonia in musicians (Medical Problems of Performing Artists, vol.25:149-161).

The prize is awarded to researchers in neuroscience, orthopaedics, and anatomy whose work is oriented to a better understanding of the underlying principles of human movement and its rehabilitation, with the Special Award being granted to excellent papers from the field of physiotherapy. Movement in this context is not restricted to locomotion, rather it covers all kinds of muscular-induced human movement including mime and music. This is only the third time the Special Award has been given (it was previously won in 2004 and 2010).

Medical practitioners involved in research may be interested in applying for the award in future years. There are 2 prizes: the Main Award, endowed with (Swiss Francs) CHF 10,000 and the Special Award, endowed with CHF 2,000. The submission deadline for this year’s prize is 30 September 2012. Click here for more detailed information (Word doc).