Posts Tagged ‘piano’

Hand Surgeon and Professor of Piano joint BAPAM clinic

Wednesday, May 1st, 2019

There are intrinsic relationships between health and performance excellence, and educational and clinical expertise in the performing arts. In overcoming medical problems, specialist diagnostic and medical expertise can be complemented by performance technique and lifestyle and health-related guidance. In a new joint clinic at BAPAM, Mr Mark Phillips, Hand Surgeon, and Penelope Roskell, Professor of Piano at Trinity Laban, are exploring this opportunity for clinicians and educators to provide each other with unique insight and feedback. We asked them to tell us more about this innovative approach.

Could you explain the idea behind the joint clinic and why you decided to do it?

Mark Phillips: In my experience when treating musicians I found quite an overlap between the physician’s knowledge and the specialist physiotherapist/hand therapist’s knowledge, who’s an expert in musicians. But I soon realised there was a huge gap for the third element which is filled by the expert tutor on that instrument. I happen to be a trumpet player so as a musician I have some insight into the patient but that’s not enough when it comes to some of the issues they face. I can relate to some of the psychological performance issues, but the expectation patients have is of someone that can really understand how the technical demands of the instrument interface with the physiological problems they’re having and anatomical problems they may have and the outcome of the clinical assessment.

Penelope Roskell: The knowledge we have between us is enormous. My students have included musicians with injuries for 40 years, and so we fill in the gaps. Seeing musicians together in a joint clinic is very important because you can then see the whole picture and then decide on the best way forward. Sometimes it may be steroid injection and sometimes it may be surgery. But sometimes it may be that a tweak or a change of technique will solve that problem and reduce the need for further intervention. So, seeing them together we can get to the root cause, which we can’t always do if seeing them independently.

How do you decide if a patient would benefit from this dual approach? What can a patient expect at a typical joint session? How do you each approach the patient?

How do you prepare for a joint clinic session?

Mark Philips: Normally I will contact Penelope to say I’ve got a patient or she may say she has a student. We will both select patients for this clinic.

Penelope Roskell: Sometimes Mark will send me over a video of that person playing, so I’ll have a chance to look at it and pick out the obvious problems about what I think may be causing it. I’ll also have a clinic letter which will give some sort of background.

Mr Phillips: We then meet up for a coffee and chat about the patient. So then the patient comes in, and if it’s my patient I present it to Penelope and on one occasion Penelope presented the patient. And then we do the history in the normal way, present findings and run through it all. I then suggest what may be the anatomical or physiological problem and how that relates to this person’s technique. The technique may have worked well for a long time but now there’s a problem which is unique to them. Looking at the technique can help if I’m referring to Penelope. Or similarly if Penelope is referring to me is there a way that some of my interventions such as hand therapy or injections or my approach to examination would throw some light on the matter. It’s that overlap which is invaluable really.

Penelope Roskell: So for instance one of my students came to the last clinic and she had problems for the last year and had come to me for that reason. And Mark gave her quite a different diagnosis to what she had been given in the past, which then informed me. So now we are working slightly differently in the lessons that I have with her privately, having now had this intervention from Mark and he also suggested a steroid injection which we are waiting to see the results to. We can then see the whole picture about the ways forward, because there isn’t always one solution. A patient may need a steroid injection or piano playing adjustments to the technique.

Mark Phillips: It’s multi-faceted, there may be Alexander Technique, hand therapy and it may be someone looking at their posture. I learn so much by looking at Penelope tutoring at the piano in terms of elbow position, shoulder position and what impact that has in terms of the way the fingers lie on the key for example. Each presentation has its own unique cocktail of remedies really.

There are complex multi-faceted problems by the time they come here and it comes down to how we triage these patients essentially. I don’t bring every pianist to this clinic.

Penelope Roskell: It’s inevitably going to be someone with a piano related injury. If they’ve broken their wrist by falling down the stairs then they should go straight Mark. Whereas it’s different when it’s something like accumulated stress from years of playing with a technique which is a tiny bit off balance. They may be very experienced players and their technique has lasted them well, but there’s something that just tips it over.

Mark Phillips: What I see in my patients is that half of them have the same problem as everybody else and that may affect how they use their instrument. And the other half have instrument related problems and it may be a combination of the two. And say if someone broke their wrist a year ago and it may be throwing out their elbow, their shoulder or their posture and it may well be a good way down the line that it’ll come to me that a session with Penelope would be helpful. Because it may be to do with their elbow and shoulder which may be making some notes inaccessible and we can work around. They’re so unique each of these cases an each of them would have their own relative roles for the two of us sitting together and discussing the case. It would be good to extend this to guitar, violin and cello and get tutors to do a similar thing. And it’s pretty unique, I don’t think there’s anyone else out there in the world doing it.

What do you feel are the benefits of having an educator in a clinical setting?

Penelope Roskell: It is a very formal environment which is a positive thing and it focusses everything which is very important.

It is a sort of pilot, it’s the first of its kind and I think it is very valuable and let’s hope that other clinics may take the idea from this and develop that further.

What are the direct benefits for patients of having the educator and clinician in the same room in a clinical setting?

Mark Phillips: We often find that patients are often reticent about coming to these clinics. They really don’t want to look at their own techniques and I suppose they remember back to days when they were being tutored and they feel self-conscious. They have to want to come to this clinic and to be looked at. It isn’t like going for a piano lesson or being taught. We are looking to see whether there’s anything about their technique that may be in anyway connected to the clinical problem they have. So we’re not trying to look at the way they play from any other perspective than that. People play in lots of different ways. Also videos are really useful, anyone with a smartphone can record themselves. When we look at them we can slow them down, go back over a sequence, look at it carefully, look at it together and see how that relates to their clinical problem.

Penelope Roskell: There is something different about the joint clinics, because I’m there involved in the consultation I’m able to ask them questions from my own point of view so that I’m well informed as to how best to help them in the future. Because a piano teacher is not qualified to diagnose and that is absolutely number one and nor am I qualified to answer questions that students sometimes ask me, like should I have that steroid injection or that operation and it’s not for me to advise on that but in this situation between the three of us we can discuss the best way forward viewing it from all the different angles.

Any challenges you are finding with the joint approach?

Mark Phillips: It’s 30 minutes long, which is short. We are just getting into our flow by half an hour.

We haven’t had a chance to find out what patients think, especially how they feel about the added value of seeing us both together.

The four patients we have seen in this format have individually expressed to us they thought it was a good session and it stimulated a lot of discussion and ideas. It would be great in the future to include a hand therapist and do a proper multi-disciplinary clinic. Hand surgeons always work very closely with hand therapists. Because there are so many different joints in the hand and different diagnoses. In the hand you’ve got unique problems to one finger or there will be a combination of problems. So your hand therapy is always bespoke, it’s all tailor made to that patient so you have to discuss each patient individually and with musicians it’s even more so.

Certainly with the three most commonest instruments this is going to be a major area of growth in the next ten years and it’s very exciting.

During the half an hour the patients sense the trust we have with each other (Penelope: we work very well as a team, we both have a lot of respect for each other’s knowledge. So I think they go away feeling they’re whole picture has been seen and assessed and we are seeing them as an individual with a problem that can be resolved.)

All patients have been bought over by the end of the 30 minute sessions. You can see the reticence and slight nervousness at the start of the half an hour turning into trust and outpouring of confidence and sharing of the problem and by half an hour we are in to the nitty gritty aren’t we. The output of that is usually I will see them again or Penelope will see them again.

What they can do is continue seeing Penelope for a while and see me in the clinic two months later and see how things have been going on in the meantime. And because we know each other well we can send secure emails back and forth and stay in touch.

BAPAM Performance Environment Day

Tuesday, November 6th, 2018

What would an ideal performance environment look like? Is such a thing even possible when we work in such widely different spaces? How do our environments affect our health, our creativity, our social relationships? What can healthcare professionals, technicians, artists, support organisations and communities do to both support performing arts wellbeing and facilitate excellence in artistic practice?

Our Performance Environment Day explores these topics, from a healthcare perspective and including the experiences of other professionals including artists, technicians, educators and people working in arts support roles, some with additional needs due to illness, injury, difference or disability

You can now read the full programme.

The event takes place at Resource for London on November 17, 9.30 – 17.00.

Tickets are available here.

 


Presentations and Discussion

The Performance Environment: Challenges in the Performing Arts Industry
Sophie Lane, Specialist Performing Arts and Sport Physiotherapist

Saving Your Ears for the Music!
Gladys Akinseye and Jordon Thompson, Clinical Audiologists and Hearing Therapists

Preparing for Challenging Performance Careers
Arran Peck, Athletic Development and Conditioning Coach, National Centre for Circus Arts

Cognitive Function of Adult Amateur Pianists
Dr Marie McKavanagh, GP, MSc Performing Arts Medicine Shipley Rudge Award Winner

Anxiety and Psychological Support for Theatre Productions and Artists
Dr Anna Colton, Chartered Clinical Psychologist

Panel Discussion/Q&A

Do our performance environments facilitate or obstruct artistic practice? How can the ways in which we design, manage, use and share space be a positive factor in healthy practice? Collective support in creative communities, accessibility and participation.

Kris Halpin, Musician/Producer
Robin Townley, CEO Association of British Theatre Technicians
Lisa Tregale, Head of BSO Participate, Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra
Siân Willett, Co-creator of Wellbeing for the Arts

Dan Hayhurst, BAPAM Information Coordinator (Chair)

International Symposium in Performance Science, Reykjavik

Thursday, September 28th, 2017

The MSc in Performing Arts Medicine and BAPAM were well represented this month at the International Symposium in Performance Science (ISPS) in Reykjavik, Iceland, with research papers by Dr Trish Halliwell, Dr Philippa Whebble, Dr Farrah Jawad, Dr Hara Trouli, osteopath Tommi Sliiden and physiotherapists Kari Arnason, Lindsay Wallace and Krzystoff Dabrowski. Projects on flautists’ injuries, breathing relaxation for singers, vitamin D levels in dancers, health issues of popular musicians, lung function when singing and dancing, muscle injuries in string players, footwear and dancers’ injuries, and palmaris longus in pianists were received with great interest by the conference delegates. It is important to see such a group on the international arena of Performing Arts Medicine and we hope this will encourage more researchers to bring their work to this level. Congratulations to all involved!

Goldberg Variations Concert to raise funds for BAPAM

Thursday, December 15th, 2016

An opportunity to hear the complete Goldberg Variations by J S Bach, performed by pianist Graham Fitch

Long regarded as the most serious and ambitious work for keyboard, the Goldberg Variations display Bach’s exceptional knowledge of the many different styles of music of his day, and his own exquisite performing techniques. Originating from a simple idea – a beautiful aria over a repeating bass – the thirty variations present the history of Baroque music in microcosm: lavish displays of fashionable expressive elements of the high Baroque, with just a hint of Classical idealism, together with magnificent structure and formal beauty.

Acclaimed pianist, teacher and writer Graham Fitch has performed the Goldberg Variations on numerous occasions across four continents to rapturous acclaim.

The performance will be followed by a talk and audience discussion/Q&A with the performer, chaired by classical music blogger Frances Wilson (AKA The Cross-Eyed Pianist), which promises to offer fascinating insights into Bach’s wondrous music and the pleasures and challenges of performing it.

Take advantage of this special ticket offer and enjoying priority booking at a discounted price (£14 instead of £18 – limited offer).

BOOK TICKETS

https://billetto.co.uk/en/events/bachs-goldberg-variations-special-offer

Date: Friday 17th March 2017, 7pm Venue: Rosslyn Hill Chapel, Hampstead, London NW3 (just a short walk from Hampstead tube station).

The performance will last approximately 80 minutes. There will be an interval with refreshments before the Q&A session.

All profits from ticket sales will be donated to BAPAM (British Association for Performing Arts Medicine).

Health and Wellbeing Month – in Association with The Musicians’ Union, Help Musicians UK and BAPAM

Thursday, July 7th, 2016

Through August 2016, we are delighted to be partnering with Help Musicians UK (HMUK) and the Musicians Union (MU) for Health and Wellbeing Month, packed with events where health and performance experts meet music creators to share essential skills for peak performance throughout a healthy and successful career. Health and Wellbeing Month sees each organisation bring their own focus and expertise to benefit the whole UK community of musicians.

Events will be held in Glasgow, Manchester, Birmingham, Cardiff, and London, with more to be confirmed across the UK.

WORKSHOPS

Expert BAPAM trainers will host an array of events sharing practical skills to boost performance and avoid health problems. From Vocal Health, to Ways to Beat Stress and Deal with Perfectionism, right through to Drumming without Pain, the workshops will be available to all musicians or artists, at any stage of their career.

All workshops cost just £5 for MU members, £8 for trade body members, and £10 standard price. Please click on the specific workshop listings below for further information, including how to book. Spaces are limited so please ensure to book in advance.

Tuesday 2 August, 2 – 4.30pm, MU Offices, London
Vocal Health with Jenevora Williams

Wednesday 3 August, 2 – 4.30pm, MU Offices, Birmingham
Vocal Health with Jenevora Williams

Thursday 4 August, 2 – 4.30pm, MU Offices, London
The Healthy Performer with Drusilla Redman

Tuesday 9 August, 2 – 4.30pm, RWCMD, Cardiff
Injury Prevention for musicians – a physiotherapist’s viewpoint with Sarah Upjohn

Wednesday 10 August, 2 – 4.30pm, MU Offices, Birmingham
Realising potential in performance: an introduction to Alexander Technique with Alison Loram

Monday 15 August, 2 – 4.30pm, MU Offices, London
The Healthy Pianist with Penelope Roskell

Tuesday 16 August, 2 – 4.30pm, MU Offices, Birmingham
The Healthy Performer with Drusilla Redman

Wednesday 17 August, 2 – 4.30pm, MU Offices, London
Ways to beat stress and deal with perfectionism with Carol Chapman

Thursday 18 August, 2 – 4.30pm, MU Offices, London
Drumming Without Pain: Injury Prevention Workshop with Martin Ranscombe

Monday 22 August, 2 – 4.30pm, MU Offices, London
Introduction to Feldenkrais for Musicians with Emma Alter

Tuesday 23 August , 2 – 4.30pm, MU Offices, Birmingham
Introduction to Feldenkrais for Musicians with Emma Alter

Tuesday 30 August, 2-4.30pm, Philharmonic Hall, Liverpool
Gain without Pain: Workshop for Woodwind Players with Andrew Roberts

Tuesday 30 August, 2 – 4.30pm, RSNO, Glasgow
Help and Advice for Being a Healthy Performer with Dr Faith Gardner

For any Workshops queries, contact Diane Widdison, National Organiser – Education and Training at MU on diane.widdison@themu.org.

MUSICIANS INSIGHTS

Musicians Insights are an ‘In Conversation’ series of events raising awareness of key health issues for musicians. We’ll hear personal stories from musicians who have dealt with particular issues. The discussions will provide a better understanding of musicians’ individual situations and show about how various charities and services fit into the support network for musicians. Musicians Insights will be an informal yet informative platform to widen perceptions of what it means to be a professional musician, and throw some insight into what can be done to improve situations for the future.

All evenings are free to attend. Please click on the specific Musicians Insights events below for further information, including how to book. Spaces are limited so please ensure to book in advance.

Monday 8 August, 6.30pm – 9pm, Band On The Wall, Manchester

Thursday 11 August, 6.30pm – 9pm, Band On The Wall, Manchester

Monday 15 August, 6.30pm – 9pm, Cardiff

Wednesday 17 August, 6.30pm – 9pm, Glasgow

Thursday 18 August, 6.30pm – 9pm, London

Wednesday 24 August, 6.30pm – 9pm, London

For any Musicians Insights queries, contact Sarah Wainman, Events Officer at HMUK on events@helpmusicians.org.uk, or call 020 7239 9153

Lorraine Womack-Banning Concert will Support BAPAM and Tibbs Dementia Services

Wednesday, October 7th, 2015

We are very grateful to Lorraine Womack-Banning for her kindness in donating all proceeds from her forthcoming Memorial Concert for Raymond Banning to BAPAM and Tibbs Dementia Services.

Book tickets online here 

Wednesday 2 December 2015
1901 Arts Club, Hattori Foundation, London
Doors Open at 7:00PM
Starts at 7:30PM

Remembering the pianist Raymond Banning on the 3rd anniversary of his death.

Raymond Banning was a Concert Pianist and Professor of Piano at Trinity College of Music, London until 2010 when aged just 58 he was diagnosed with a rare and rapidly progressing form of young onset dementia. Sadly Raymond passed away on 2nd Dec 2012 aged 60.

Raymond’s wife Lorraine Womack-Banning presents and performs this recital as a dedication to Raymond and a fundraiser for two of the organisations who offered great support to Raymond and Lorraine.

The concert features a World Premiere of composer S. G Potts The Raymond Variations for Piano (set 1) Variations on the Andantino Themes from the Raymond Overture by Ambroise Thomas

E. GRANADOS Quejas O la Maja y el Ruisenor (The Maiden and the Nightingale), Goyescas

E. GRANADOS El Amor y la Muerte (Ballad of Love and Death), Goyescas

G. BIZET Petit mari, petite femme! Duo, Jeux d’enfants, Op 22

World Premiere:
Variations for Piano (set:1) on the Andantino Themes from the Raymond Overture by Ambroise Thomas, Varations by S. G POTTS (2015)

C. DEBUSSY Pagodes, Estampes

BAPAM Training Day, Sunday May 17, Cambridge

Thursday, March 5th, 2015

Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge
9.30 – 4.30 

Turning an expert eye on the health impact of touring, ENT/reflux and specific issues around piano playing, our programme includes:

Travel health for performers – presentation by Dr Charlie Easmon.

Pianists’ performance issues – presentations by:  Dr Hara Trouli, BAPAM Musculoskeletal physician; Sarah Upjohn, BAPAM and Purcell School physiotherapist. Demonstrations by pianists and keyboard students.

Gastric reflux and the voice – ENT Consultant, Mrs Jan Panesar, and speech therapist speakers to be confirmed.

Lunch is included in the ticket price.

Cancellations prior to 3 May will be fully refunded.

Booking is now open here: http://bapamtraining2015a.eventbrite.co.uk

If you’re not already a Friend of BAPAM, please consider becoming one. Friends have the opportunity to book Early Bird tickets to BAPAM events, with considerable savings on the usual price (Early Bird bookings are now closed for this event). Please note, if you’re already in ‘Price Band A’, you won’t save more by becoming a Friend, but your support will help us deliver our services and keep the performing arts in good health.

This event is part of our regular series of training days for health professionals, researchers, practitioners and others engaged in performing arts healthcare, welfare and education.

We are grateful to Anglia Ruskin University Music Department for providing a free venue for this event and for supporting us as members of the BAPAM Student Advocate Scheme.

Research: Joint Position Sense in Performing Artists

Tuesday, February 25th, 2014

Do you sing and tap dance? Or Do you sing and play the piano? 

Would you like to find out how good your Joint Position Sense is?

If your answer is YES, physiotherapist and Performing Arts Medicine MSc Student, Vivien Koh, would like to invite you to participate in a study on Joint Position Sense in Performing Artists.

The test will be held on a weekend in March at the BAPAM clinic in central London.

To get involved, please send an email with your name and course of study/work to vivien.koh.13@ucl.ac.uk

This study is conducted as part of a MSc Dissertation at University College London, and approved by the UCL Research Ethics Committee. Participation is voluntary and you can leave the research at any time.

BAPAM Scotland Awareness Meeting Report

Monday, October 21st, 2013

Dr Faith Gardner (BAPAM Clinician, Glasgow)
12th October 2013

BAPAM CEO, Deborah Charnock, and Office and Clinics Manager, Clare Hicks came to meet 30 people in Glasgow last Saturday afternoon at a meeting organised by me to introduce BAPAM to the performers and the BAPAM Scottish Directory members to performers and each other. It’s never been done until now!

Deborah and Clare outlined BAPAM’s current and future plans with an overview of the Directory and how to get involved, and Clare explained how BAPAM clinics are administered from the London HQ and what happens when Scottish performers contact them.

In my role as the BAPAM Glasgow clinician I then commented on historical and current activity at BAPAM Glasgow. I talked about why people come, how they are assessed and what might be the outcomes.

Natasha Gerson, BAPAM Trustee and Equity Co Vice-President, Dance Councillor, (for UK), and member of the Scottish Committee highlighted Equity’s relationship with BAPAM and described personal benefits from the BAPAM system.

The BAPAM Directory members present… Dr Sara Watkin (BAPAM Clinician, Edinburgh), Patrice Berque (physiotherapist), Josephine Keys (physiotherapist), Isobel Anderson (piano and Alexander Technique teacher), and Richard Beauchamp, each presented themselves… the who/what/why of their roles within performing arts medicine.

The audience and speakers performed impeccably and asked many questions, suggested many good ideas and had lots of opportunity to network among the students, institutional representatives, performers, BAPAM staff and healthcare professionals present.

I set out with the aim of increasing awareness among performers and healthcare professionals of BAPAM in Scotland. This is an ongoing process but this meeting’s success means we are on our way!!

Where to next? Watch this space!  Please contact me on faith_gardner@msn.com

Jacqueline du Pré Concert – 5 March

Tuesday, February 26th, 2013

A special evening in aid of the Musicians Benevolent Fund at Wigmore Hall

The Jacqueline du Pré concerts are held annually to perpetuate the memory of Jacqueline du Pré, one of the greatest cellists of her generation, who died of multiple sclerosis at the age of 42. Since 1996 these concerts have raised money for different musical and medical charities. This year the concert is held in aid of the Musicians Benevolent Fund.

The funds raised will be dedicated to the Fund’s Jacqueline du Pré Special Fund which supports musicians with a serious disability. The Fund currently helps more than thirty musicians with MS, other degenerative diseases or spinal cord injuries.

Book tickets here