Posts Tagged ‘posture’

Musicians’ Union Wellbeing Week

Monday, July 22nd, 2013

The Musicians’ Union, with input from BAPAM and the Musicians Benevolent Fund, hold a Wellbeing Week for their members in August.

Wellbeing sessions take place in London and Birmingham, and for those unable to attend corporeally, there is also the option to join in via Skype transmission.

Sessions will cover healthy practice, posture, stress, life-coaching, yoga, and more.

This is a fantastic opportunity to benefit from the experience and wisdom of a range of professionals who work with musicians enabling them to have healthier and happier lifestyles.

 

Click here for all the information.

 

Health, Injury and Prevention Workshop for Musicians

Monday, June 10th, 2013

Kathy Whitehouse, cellist and cello teacher with a special interest in posture and injury prevention, has organised this interactive workshop for musicians covering common playing related injuries; particularly the hand, shoulder and back; how they may be prevented and treated.

Guest speaker: Mr Ian Winspur

Mr Ian Winspur is a Consultant Plastic and Hand Surgeon, who has focused his interests and specialisation in Hand Surgery and the management of complex hand problems. He has a specialist interest in the musician’s hand and has helped many professional musicians to maintain comfortable performance and continued careers in the face of hand conditions or post-trauma. Mr Winspur is co-author of The Musician’s Hand with BAPAM’s Dr Christopher Wynn Parry.

Dr Simon Shaw: GP, specialist registrar in rehabilitation medicine, dancer and movement practitioner

Dr James Inklebarger: Tutor in Osteopathy and Specialist in Exercise and Sports Medicine

Kathy Whitehouse, LLCM: Cellist, Cello teacher with a special interest in posture and injury prevention

June 22nd 2013, 2 – 5 pm

London College of Osteopathic Medicine
8 / 10 Boston Place
London
NW1 6QH

Cost £35

Musicians, please take your instrument

Booking: 0207 262 1128

Bookings limited to 15 places

Please note this event is not organised by BAPAM

 

BAPAM Enhancing Performance Workshop, University of Leeds

Wednesday, January 23rd, 2013

Katherine Lambeth, BAPAM Student Advocate at the University of Leeds Music School, reports on the Enhancing Performance Workshop which she organised at the Music School on 4th November 2012. Sessions were led by Professor Howard Bird (Rheumatologist and BAPAM Clinician), Virginia Whiteley (Physiotherapist) and Alison Loram (Alexander Technique Teacher).

Event Summary

The workshop was comprised of four sessions; I have provided a short summary about each session below along with number of attendees. In addition to these sessions I made the students aware of the Musicians Benevolent Fund Student Health Scheme and provided flyers about both this and BAPAM.

Introduction to Soft Tissue Massage: presented by Virginia Whiteley with 18 attendees

This session involved students pairing up and being taught how to find pressure points and knots in common areas of discomfort for musicians.  We were also taught how to massage these points once found and what to feel for in order to identify problem zones.

Introduction to Pilates: presented by Virginia Whiteley with 20 attendees

Each student was provided with various pieces of equipment and some of the basics of Pilates were introduced, including an explanation of how it can help musicians to prevent injury.  We were taught the basic standing positions and what to feel for, followed by a few exercises to help specific areas of the body.

Alexander Technique Presentation: presented by Alison Loram with 16 attendees

Alison presented a talk on the Alexander Technique that explained the origins of and theory behind the discipline.  She also discussed her current research into Musicians’ Health problems, particularly in violinists and violists.

RSI Presentation: presented by Howard Bird with 9 attendees

In this presentation Howard discussed what RSI involves, its most common forms and how it may be caused.

Feedback Form ‘Results’

The feedback forms asked students to comment on five areas of interest:

–  Overall impression of the day with general comments

–  Why they attended

–  Improvements on the sessions/organisation of the day

–  Anything new they’d like to see in the future

–  Would they attend another day

Responses to the first and last areas were unanimous with every student answering that they had greatly enjoyed the workshop day and that they would attend another.  The more practical ‘hands-on’ sessions generated a lot of positive responses with a quarter of respondents stating that it was specifically for this that they would attend again.  Over half of the students answered that they attended the workshop as they already had health problems that they want to deal with.  Just under half had a general interest in the activities, with some people attending for specific sessions, hence the changing numbers between sessions.  It was commented on that the variety of topics covered was appealing.

The students were very forthcoming with ideas for future workshops.  The most common responses were that they wanted more activity-based sessions, and fewer run as lectures.  Over 80% of students specified that they now wanted to have an active Alexander Technique session to get an idea of how the discipline works physically.  Multiple attendees commented that they would like to have sessions focussed on either specific parts of the body or specific instruments/instrument groups.  Several also wrote that they would like to learn about good practice and attend a one to one clinic.

In terms of logistical arrangements the day ran relatively smoothly.  Were the event to happen again, which it hopefully will, I would advise the following:

–  Ensure room bookings are made well in advance

–  Find out in advance if the main entrance to the department will be open or not

–  Provide Guest Speakers with maps of the University so they can find Music

–  Check that the projector/ any equipment required works before the day itself

Action on Feedback

In response to the feedback provided after the Workshop Day I have set up, or made enquiries about, several sessions for the new semester.  We have scheduled in the next Health Clinic already, where students can take their instrument to be seen one to one by the practitioner.  I have begun discussions with Alison Loram about running an active Alexander Technique session and have also written to Andrew Roberts (woodwind) and Ian MacDonald (BAPAM Vocal Health Advisor and Voice Coach) about running instrument specific workshops with students.  Dr Jonathan White (BAPAM Clinician) has agreed to present on healthy exam practice before the final performance exams of the year begin and I am working on getting in touch with a specialist in Performance Anxiety.  Although this was not written in the feedback from this day, I know that it affects a great number of students and will be beneficial to them as much as the aforementioned sessions will be.

Musical Athletes

Thursday, July 5th, 2012

This Weekend, 7th/8th July, the Cheltenham Music Festival plays host to Musical Athletes, a series of talks on the musical body – how it works, how it sometimes doesn’t work, and how it can be fixed. Organised jointly by BAPAM and the Cheltenham Festivals Laboratory, the event takes a look at the musculoskeletal demands on musicians’ bodies, voice production, injuries and breathing techniques, as well as complementary therapies including Alexander Technique and Mindfulness.

Aaron Williamon, Professor of Performance Science at the Royal College of Music, will be analysing the physiological effects of performance on concert pianist, Melvyn Tan, by measuring his heart rate, breathing, skin temperature and posture during his solo recital on Sunday morning. You can read more about Professor Williamon’s project in this Guardian piece by Tom Service (4th July, 2012).

Back by Popular Demand – An Introduction to Treating the Performing Artist

Wednesday, June 6th, 2012

Jennie Morton,osteopath and lecturer & module leader for the UCL/BAPAM Performing Arts Medicine MSc, is repeating her one-day course, An Introduction To Treating The Performing Artist, on Sunday July 1st at the British School of Osteopathy in London.

AN INTRODUCTION TO TREATING THE PERFORMING ARTIST
a one-day CPD course for musculoskeletal practitioners

Sunday July 1st 2012

10.00am – 5.00pm

at

THE BRITISH SCHOOL OF OSTEOPATHY – Berthon Room

275, Borough High Street. London. SE1 1JE

Common injuries in Dancers, Instrumental Musicians, Vocalists & Actors

Assessment, treatment & management approaches for performers

The postural, ergonomic & technique issues faced by performing artists

The environmental challenges for performing artists

7 Hours CPD

Course Fee £85 (Students £70)

Course Tutor:

Jennie Morton BSc (Hons) Osteopathy

UCL Honorary Lecturer & Module Leader for the MSc in Performing Arts Medicine, UCL Division of Surgery & Interventional Science

Osteopath & Lecturer for The British Association for Performing Arts Medicine

Speaker for Dance UK: Healthier Dancer Programme

For further info or to request a booking form, please email jennie@jenniemorton.co.uk

An Introduction to Treating The Performing Artist

Wednesday, March 28th, 2012

Jennie Morton, osteopath and lecturer & module leader for the UCL/BAPAM Performing Arts Medicine MSc, presents a one-day CPD course for musculoskeletal practitioners:

AN INTRODUCTION TO TREATING THE PERFORMING ARTIST

Sunday April 15th 2012

10.00am – 5.00pm

at

THE BRITISH SCHOOL OF OSTEOPATHY – Berthon Room

275, Borough High Street. London. SE1 1JE

The day will include:

Common injuries in Dancers, Instrumental Musicians, Vocalists & Actors

Assessment, treatment & management approaches for performers

The postural, ergonomic & technique issues faced by performing artists

The environmental challenges for performing artists

7 Hours CPD

Course Fee £85 (Students £70)

Course Tutor:

Jennie Morton BSc (Hons) Osteopathy

UCL Honorary Lecturer & Module Leader for the MSc in Performing Arts Medicine, UCL Division of Surgery & Interventional Science

Osteopath & Lecturer for The British Association for Performing Arts Medicine

Speaker for Dance UK: Healthier Dancer Programme

For further info or to request a booking form, please email jennie@jenniemorton.co.uk

Guitarists Research

Tuesday, February 21st, 2012

Guitarists, are you interested in taking part in research into guitar support tools and the curvature of your spine while playing?

Postgraduate UCL student, Efthalia Paleokastriti, is looking for classical and acoustic guitarists for her study.

Efthalia believes that guitarists taking part will benefit from the insights gained: “You will have the opportunity to test your guitar playing using different support tools and you may decide which is better for you. Moreover, you may be more informed about the “right” posture of the body while holding the guitar and about ergonomic playing”.

Efthalia explains the project and how you can get involved:

Dear Guitarist,

I am investigating functional scoliosis in guitarists using different guitar support tools.

This involves a temporary change of spinal curvature caused by a provocative factor – in this case, playing the guitar.

I am looking for guitarists to participate in the research project. Specifically, classical or acoustic guitarists (who use a footstool or ergo play guitar support equipment) and who are professionals or experienced guitar players (3 years or more).

The research includes:

  1. answering an anonymous questionnaire (questions about guitar playing habits/pain occurrence/use of guitar support tools).
  2. arrangement of a meeting in which we will take photos of your back while you hold the guitar and use guitar tools.

Participating in this research will be beneficial for you because you will learn more about ergonomic playing and you will try different guitar support equipment.

Participation is voluntary and you can leave the research at any time. If you agree to participate in the study, you will be given a detailed information sheet and a consent form. If you have any queries about our project do not hesitate to contact me.

We are looking forward to hearing from you.

Please read the Information Sheet which includes a detailed description of the project.

And please complete and return the Anonymous Questionnaire – you can answer it even if you decide not to participate in the measurement part of the research.

Contact details: EFTHALIA PALAIOKASTRITI. Email: thaliapaleo@gmail.com

Note: This research project is not being conducted by BAPAM. The project has official ethics approval from UCL (University College of London) and is covered by UCL’s  data protection protocol.