Posts Tagged ‘Psychology’

BAPAM Training Day ‘Performance Matters: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Performers’ Practice, Health and Wellbeing’

Thursday, October 9th, 2014

SUNDAY 16th November, London

What is music performance?

The Royal College of Music will be our hosts for a day of discussion and exploratory sessions investigating many different aspects of performance.

Book your ticket here: https://bapamtraining.eventbrite.co.uk

Performance is commonly explored within a specific domain, such as music, dance, theatre or sport. Although increasingly researched and theorised by academics as an overarching phenomenon, the findings of such research are not always embraced by the experts whose domains are studied. In this BAPAM training day, we examine what performance means across apparently unrelated contexts in order to consider how insights from one domain illuminate practice in another. We draw on personal experience of the fields of surgery (Roger Kneebone) and music (Aaron Williamon), selected from numerous possible examples, in order to highlight similarities and differences between areas of practice which at first sight seem remote. On closer inspection, each can be seen as an embodied practice where much that is important lies beyond the reach of words and must be directly experienced to be apprehended. We then explore the implications of embodied practice for the health and wellbeing of performers. Here, we focus specifically on musical performance, discussing both the possibilities that embodied practice affords but also the range of challenges it presents in educational and professional contexts. Throughout, we highlight recent advances in simulation science as ways of understanding embodied practice better and facilitating more effective approaches to developing performance skills.

This event is part of a regular series of training days provided by the British Association for Performing Arts Medicine (BAPAM) for health professionals, researchers and practitioners interested in performer healthcare.

The day will be led by Aaron Williamon, Professor of Performance Science at the Royal College of Music (RCM) and  Roger Kneebone, Professor of Surgical Education at Imperial College London, and includes a demonstration of the Performance Simulator at the RCM Centre for Performance Science.

Click here to download the full schedule for the day.

Lunch is included in the ticket price.

Cancellations prior to 16 October will be refunded.

Book your ticket here: https://bapamtraining.eventbrite.co.uk

Newsletter August 2014

Wednesday, August 13th, 2014

The current BAPAM Newsletter (August 2014)  is now available to read or download in pdf format: BAPAM Newsletter August 2014

Contents:

BAPAM Journal

Pegasus Chamber Choir Fundraising Concert for BAPAM –  For the Fallen

BAPAM Training Day – What is Music Performance 

Clinics News

Musicians’ Dystonia Reseach at UCL Institute of Neurology

BAPAM Scotland Update

PRS for Music Members Benevolent Fund Support

New Patrons

New Staff

Fundraisers

Friends Scheme

BAPAM Journal Issue 2

Wednesday, July 23rd, 2014

Issue 2 of the BAPAM Journal, our free online resource and channel of communication for all those engaged with performing arts health, education and welfare, is now available to download here: BAPAM Journal Issue 2 – July 2014. Many thanks to all our contributors and those who have made a voluntary effort to assist with its production. Please consider supporting our work by becoming a Friend of BAPAM or making a one-off donation.

Contents include:

Interview with Professor Rodney Grahame on performing arts medicine and hypermobility

Work, Identity and Involuntary Musical Career Transition Jane Oakland

Playing-related Musculoskeletal Disorders in Flautists: A Pilot Study Investigating Risk Factors and Interventions that may Affect Outcomes
Dr Patricia Halliwell

The Impact of Hypermobility in the Finger Joints of Flautists Isobel Artigues-Cano

Biotensegrity and Cello-playing Felicity Vincent

The BAPAM Student Advocate Scheme: Reflections on a Health Promotion Initiative at the University of Leeds Naomi Norton

BAPAM Clinics: Learning from our Patients Deborah Charnock, Dan Hayhurst and Clare Hicks

Reflections on Contributing to the NICE Consultation Process on Developing the Guidelines for Social Anxiety Disorder Dr Carol Chapman

European Union Exchange Programme – An initiative to Encourage International Collaborations in Health Promotion Asmund Prytz

Book Review: The Alexander Technique for Musicians by Judith Kleinman and Peter Buckoke Alison Loram

Performing Arts Medicine MSc Student Hub

Student Advocate Scheme Update Naomi Norton

Previous Issues: 

BAPAM Journal Issue 1 June 2013

 

The Hypermobile Learner

Wednesday, May 28th, 2014

STOP PRESS! Last minute places have become available on the course. Contact Lesley McPherson for more details at info@classicalpilatesuk.com

Lesley McPherson, Director of Classical Pilates UK, and BAPAM’s Glasgow clinician, Dr Faith Gardener, are running a workshop for teachers and coaches involved in teaching movement and sport, looking at the hypermobile learner.

This event takes place on June 21st 2014 in Troon, Ayrshire

Please note: this event is not organised by BAPAM and we receive no income from it. 

Anyone from adults, young dancers and athletes can be hypermobile and this presents unique challenges to the teacher and the student. This workshop will address not only the science and how to recognise hypermobility but will touch on the psychology of hypermobility and the application of exercise to strengthen the hypermobile student.

Attendance costs £140 including lunch. If you are interested in booking a place please email Lesley McPherson - info@classicalpilatesuk.com

The organisers have informed us that they are nearly full for this session and are therefore building up a waiting list. Enough interest will generate further dates so please let them know as soon as possible if you’d like to attend.

Psychological Self-care

Wednesday, May 14th, 2014

This week is Mental Health Awareness Week.

1 in 5 of us suffer from mental health problems at some point in our lives so it’s important to know how to stay happy and healthy.

Help Musicians UK asked BAPAM’s assessing psychologist, Dr Carol Chapman, to share her expertise with them. Carol works with BAPAM to advise performing arts professionals and students about mental health issues related to their work in the industry. You can read her article here:

Tips for musicians to keep mentally healthy and enhance well-being

Great advice for musicians and non-musicians alike!

Creativity, Music and the Brain

Tuesday, March 11th, 2014

What is the role of music in UK society? What happens to our brains when we listen to music? Can music help to heal the brain in physical and mental disorders? What does the musician’s brain teach us about neuroplasticity? What can we learn from a composer such as Chopin and from modern composers and musicians? 

Creativity, music and the brain: The power of music over the mind is the Royal Society of Medicine’s AGM and annual dinner, held on Tuesday 13 May 2014

Early bird tickets are now on sale here, where you can also find all the details of this fascinating event.

Jane Oakland, Music Psychologist

Wednesday, January 15th, 2014

Welcome to the BAPAM Directory, Dr Jane Oakland, a psychologist specialising in musicians and performance. Jane has also been a professional opera singer for 35 years. Through her own experience of debilitating performance anxiety Jane became interested in the impact of stress on the careers of professional musicians.

 

Jane’s excellent website, www.stresspoints.co.uk, provides a wealth of useful information on the psychology of performance,  as well as articles she has contributed to Classical Music Magazine, the Incorporated Society of Musicians, and Help Musicians UK (formerly the Musicians Benevolent Fund).

Event Report: Performers in their Environment Training Day

Thursday, November 28th, 2013

Our November 2013 event brought together actors and musicians with professionals working in performing arts healthcare, education and support and welfare, for a stimulating investigation into the work, lifestyle and health realities of the industry.

Professor of Performance Science, Aaron Williamon, discussed musicians’ hearing and the tricky issue of noise regulations for workers for whom noise is their product.

Philip Turner, Senior Stage Manager of the English National Opera, shared valuable expertise and insights into the considerations of caring for performers, crew, and audience, and in supervising the work environment, both at the ENO in London, and on touring productions. Osteopath, Jennie Morton, presented on workplace hazards, drawing from her work as a performer (dance/theatre/singing).

Former professional oboist turned pioneering Performance Coach, Karen O’Connor, was joined by a singer and a double bassist to discuss novel applications of sport psychology for managing performance anxiety and developing mental toughness.

We also heard from professional performers about the ups and downs of their careers. Jungle Drummer, Chris Polglase, talked us through his career, from leaving music school in frustration at course requirements that he learn endless indie rock parts, to turning a hobby into a sustained professional career playing 180bpm drum & bass beats, alongside turntablists and musicians from a diverse spectrum of styles. Chris talked about the pressures of extensive touring, playing 5am gigs at clubs and festivals, studio sessions, and gradually learning self confidence and how to care for yourself.

Bringing a fascinating day to a close, David Sulkin, Chief Executive of the Musicians Benevolent Fund, interviewed two actors at very different stages of their careers – covering the stresses (physical, emotional and financial) and rewards of the profession.

We’d like to thank all the speakers, performers and attendees.  All agreed that first hand discussion with performing arts professionals proved especially valuable in providing perspective for those who seek to help care for their health and welfare. Thanks also to the Musicians’ Union for so generously providing the venue.

More information about our Training Days can be found here: BAPAM Training Days.

Dance Psychology Conference

Wednesday, November 13th, 2013

Beyond the body: Psychological tools for performance enhancement and wellbeing in dance

This event has been organised by Dance UK and the Royal Society of Medicine in response to calls from leading dance professionals for more support and information about performers’ psychological health. It will examine the psychological issues facing dancers and the dance sector, as well as the psychological skills needed to thrive.

Learn how and why mental training improves performance. Understand how perfectionism and injury can affect performance and well-being. Explore the psychology of career transition. Discover how to apply theory in practice in both dance environments and health contexts. Network with fellow dancers, teachers, managers and support staff.

Take a look here for more info: Dance UK Psychology Conference Flyer

DATE: Friday 29 November 2013

TIME: 9:30am – 9pm

VENUE: Birmingham Hippodrome, Hurst Street, Birmingham B5 4TB

TICKETS: £30 – £200

Book at www.rsm.ac.uk/academ/ree03.php or call 020 7713 0730 for further information.

Research: How Musicians Experience Forms of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT)

Tuesday, October 22nd, 2013

Call for Participants: 

 

Ellis Pecen is a Masters student in Performance Science at the Royal College of Music, interested in exploring how musicians experience forms of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT). To do this, a short anonymous online survey has been developed that should take about 15-20 minutes to complete. In this survey you will be asked anonymous questions about your musical background and your experiences with CBT. The research has received ethical approval from the Conservatoires UK Research Ethics Committee.

Who can take part?

The recruitment criteria for taking part are:

1. That you are a musician (or former musician) with experiences with CBT. You can be a student, professional or a musician who plays as part of a hobby, regardless of age or experience.

2. That you are undergoing or have undergone CBT treatment. There are many approaches to CBT and many forms of delivery (e.g. private/group counselling, computerized CBT, CBT via self-help methods etc.). All forms are valid for the purposes of this research, yet in order to ensure a consistent definition of CBT we are interested in interventions that adhere to the following characteristics:

i. CBT is based on the theory that our thoughts determine our feelings and behaviour and that, therefore, changing the way we think allows us to change the way we feel and behave.

ii. CBT is problem-focused and goal-oriented. The emphasis is on the ‘now’ and the future rather than the past.

iii. CBT requires active participation from clients in the form of homework assignments designed to apply the acquired skills from the sessions to real-life situations.

iv. Clients are educated about their symptoms and are made aware of strategies to enable positive change

How do I take part?

If you feel that you meet the above criteria and would like to complete the anonymous survey, please follow this link: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/GHVPSZX

If you have any further questions about the research, feel free to contact Ellis at ellis.pecen@rcm.ac.uk

Thank you for taking the time to read through this information and considering participating in the research. You help is most appreciated!