Posts Tagged ‘Psychology’

BAPAM Psychosocial Working Group

Tuesday, May 7th, 2019

BAPAM has convened a Psychosocial Working Group to bring together clinicians including doctors, clinical psychologists, psychotherapists and counsellors, charities working with performing arts professionals to support mental health, and academics conducting key research.

The group provides a forum in which approaches to care and support can be discussed, and clinical leadership can be provided for developing and instantiating a service designed to support performing arts workers with issues related to vocation-related physical and mental health issues. We are using the NHS-approved evidence base produced by the National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE), who review the published evidence for healthcare interventions from a clinical and a cost-effectiveness perspective, to map the services available to performing artists against the clinical evidence for best practice and identify gaps in those services.

The prevalence of mental health problems is considerably higher in the performing arts community than in the general population, and suicide rates are well above the national average. There is an acute awareness of the problems within the performing arts industry and many artists have been sharing their mental health experience in the context of their work.

The group has mapped many of the initiatives developed to support performers including Help Musicians UK’s Music Minds Matter helpline, Theatre Helpline, Music Support, which has a particular focus on addictions, Equity supported Wellbeing Drop-in sessions at the Actors Centre,  Music & You, Music for Mental Wealth and BAPAM’s own free service, which provides clinical assessments for performers across the UK. In addition, there is a growing number of practitioners who have trained to work in this area, building on insights gained from previous careers in the arts industries, for example, the Music Industry Therapist Collective.

We are grateful to have had so many valuable insights from practitioners and agencies involved in this important work and together we’ve begun identifying what is available, what is missing and how we should work together to support a comprehensive approach to mental health services for performers.

Mental illness is not a straightforward condition. Some people will experience just one episode of mental ill-health in their lives. Of those who receive a brief intervention, half will recover and never have another one. Others, however, experience recurrent episodes and will continue to do so through their lives even though they may be well for significant periods of time. It is essential that performing arts professionals experiencing challenges to their mental health receive accurate diagnoses as quickly as possible to ensure they access the right care. Where brief interventions are indicated, these should be delivered by practitioners who have a track record of working with performing arts clients. Healthcare practitioners, however they are employed, need to be able to access professional support from mental health specialists to ensure they are making the right diagnoses and to refer on if necessary.

Discussions to date have identified many areas for action, but the immediate areas to take forward have been identified as follows:

  1. Development of guidance for the performing arts industry covering points of best practice for performers, care providers and all organisations commissioning care for performers
  2. Rapid access to clinical assessment to determine the best care pathway
  3. Provision of brief interventions tailored to the needs of performing artists,  focusing on performance anxiety
  4. Access to mental health specialists (e.g. psychiatrists and clinical psychologists) for advice on the management of patients’ complex needs, for practitioners working outside the NHS
  5. An annual CPD event for psychosocial practitioners working in, and developing their career in performing arts health care
  6. A collective effort to support fundraising which aims to meet identified gaps for all practitioners

The Relationship Between Occupational Demands and Well-Being of Performing Artists: A Systematic Review

Friday, March 29th, 2019

Simone Willis,  a Performance Science researcher at Cardiff Metropolitan University, has shared with us this recently published paper on the relationship between occupational stress and well-being in performing artists. The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate and synthesise data arising from 20 previous studies. The article is open access and can be read here in Frontiers of Psychology.

The review highlights the need for more high quality research on the relationship between occupational stress and well-being.

 

Psychosocial Practitioner Peer Supervision Group

Wednesday, March 27th, 2019

BAPAM is pleased to support the Peer Supervision Group for psychosocial practitioners who work with performing arts clients.

This group, whose inaugural meetings took place in 2018, opens up the conversation between performing arts and psychological practice. It is developing a growing professional network for counselling, coaching and psychology practitioners who work with performing artists of all kinds. The group meets regularly, roughly every 8 weeks, in central London.

As well as discussing clinical cases and case issues, there is interactive exploration, mutual consultation and support on more general professional practice issues, including ethical issues, boundary and confidentiality areas. Such exchanges of expertise and experience enable members to reflect on and refine best practice in working with performers. The Group offers members the chance to share specialist expertise of particular problem areas and to provide interventions, guidance, information and professional support within a rigorous evidence-based practice and practice-based evidence framework in this developing field. The Group acts as a forum not only for encouraging and developing the highest standards of practice but also for identifying, promoting and supporting new research in the field.

Members of the group use a variety of approaches and come from a range of career backgrounds. Some members bring specialist expertise within the field, for example, working with people in particular arts professions or with certain types of problem. The Group is sensitive to BAME, LGBT+ and other dimensions of difference.

It is hoped that specialised supervision of this type will become available and accessible to many more practitioners on the BAPAM Directory and the Group is keen to encourage this in whatever ways it can. Members are happy to offer advice and suggestions to practitioners wanting to start their own peer supervision group and to find ways of welcoming practitioners new to the Directory to join.

Practitioners interested in finding out more, joining the London group or starting a group of their own are invited to contact Dr Carol Chapman by email at carol@carolchapman.co.uk

Listen to the experts on World Mental Health Day 2018

Wednesday, October 10th, 2018

At BAPAM we work with mental health specialists who have the knowledge and experience to help performing arts clients.

On 17th November, Clinical Psychologist Dr Anna Colton will be speaking at our training day about the Performance Environment, covering anxiety, how it affects performance, and how she works with adults and children in West End shows. You can listen to Anna discussing the challenges that arise for workers in this industry, her background and her wider work as a psychologist in our interview below, and you can book tickets for our Performance Environment Training Day here.

 

August 2018 Newsletter

Thursday, August 23rd, 2018

Read our August 2018 Newsletter here

Scotland clinics

Arts Specialist Psychologists and Psychotherapists

PPL CEO Peter Leathem Appointed BAPAM Chairman

BAPAM Training Day: The Performance Environment

Forthcoming Events

Psychosocial Practitioners Peer Supervision Group

Tuesday, December 5th, 2017

BAPAM is pleased to support the establishment of a new Peer Supervision Group for psychosocial practitioners who work with performing arts clients.

The group, whose inaugural meetings took place earlier this year, hope to open up the conversation between performing arts and psychological practice. The aim is to foster a network for counselling, coaching and psychology practitioners working frontline with performance artists for interactive exploration, mutual consultation and support on professional practice issues, and for reflection on what constitutes best practice in working with performers, as well as to share specialist expertise, guidance and information according to a professional framework of rigorous evidence-based practice and practice-based evidence in the field.

The next meeting is scheduled to take place on December 9th, and thereafter every two months on Saturdays from 12 to 1:30 pm at the London Natural Health Centre, 46 Theobalds Road, NW1 8NW.

Practitioners interested in finding out more or joining the group are invited to contact Dr Jane Oakland by email: jane.oakland@btinternet.com

Research: The Wellbeing of Musicians Across the Lifespan

Thursday, October 5th, 2017

Musicians sometimes spend a lot of time looking at what is wrong, which can give more energy to challenges and create a downward spiral. Positive psychology is influenced by the idea that in spending more time focusing on what’s right, we allow ourselves to consider what it looks like to do well, which can in turn lead to a more positive physical/mental/emotional outworking.

Marie El-Khazen is a researcher inviting musicians aged 60+ to take part in interviews which will help develop knowledge and understanding of musicians’ perception of wellbeing as a performer, throughout a lifelong professional career.

If you’d like to help with this study you need to be aged 60+, having earned the majority of your full time income from employment as a performing musician. Interviews lasting 60 – 90 minutes will be conducted face to face, or via Skype, and will be recorded (on a dictaphone). Participants will remain anonymous. To take part or to find out more, please contact Marie directly by emailing U1620023@uel.ac.uk. You can also find here a detailed participant invitation letter.

This research has been approved by the School of Psychology Research Ethics Committee, and follows the standard of research ethics set by the British Psychological Society.

BAPAM Training Day: The Professional Voice User in Trouble

Monday, September 4th, 2017

Our November 2017 Training Day brings a multidisciplinary focus to bear on vocal health issues affecting professional voice users. Presented in collaboration with voice care experts at the forefront of the field, this event is ideal for medical professionals and students, voice coaches, professional voice users, teachers, healthcare practitioners, and all those engaged in wellbeing in the creative arts, who want to develop specialist knowledge and skills. BAPAM Training Days are also a great opportunity for discussion, sharing insights with peers, making new connections and growing our performing arts medicine network.

Book your place here

Our timetable for the day will be confirmed shortly. Presentations include:

Mr Nick Gibbins, Laryngologist
The Surgeon’s Perspective

Nick Gibbins will take us through the types of vocal injuries and disorders that face professional performers including musculoskeletal issues, inflammatory problems, and organic lesions of the vocal folds. The laryngologist’s role in the multidisciplinary voice clinic will be explored including diagnosis and surgical intervention.

Tori Burnay, Voice Specialist Speech and Language Therapist
The Therapist’s Perspective

Tori Burnay will show us the therapist’s side of endoscopic examination including the muscular behaviour of the larynx and vocal tract in healthy and disordered speech. Muscle tension issues, vocal hygiene, workload management and potential therapy plans will be discussed.

Dr Carol Chapman, Counselling Psychologist and Performance Coach

Dr Jane Oakland, Music Psychologist and Singer
Psychological Perspectives

Examining the difference in presentation, conceptualisation and treatment between professional voice users who have a medical diagnosis and those for whom no diagnosis has emerged and whose problems appear to have a purely psychogenic origin. Discussing the psychological and social/career impact of having voice problems in these circumstances and at different stages during a performing career. Using illustrations from client work, suggesting what clinicians should look out for. Illustrating techniques for rehabilitation and coping.

Prof. Dane Chalfin, Vocal Rehabilitation Coach
The Singing Perspective

Dane Chalfin will guide us through the Vocal Rehabilitation Coach’s role in the interpretation of the laryngopharyngeal gestures in healthy and disordered singing in various styles. Muscle tension issues in the singing voice and rehabilitative pedagogy will be discussed. This will also include a live scoping session where Mr Nick Gibbins will perform nasendoscopy on Professor Chalfin live in front of the audience. We will be inviting attendees to submit requests for singing gestures they would like to see in situ.

Ed Blake, Physiotherapist
The Physiotherapist’s Perspective

Ed Blake presents on physiotherapy treatment for professional voice users suffering voice related symptoms.

YCAT Sounding Board – Health and Wellbeing for Performers

Wednesday, January 11th, 2017

YCAT Sounding Board is the new initiative from the Young Classical Artists Trust (YCAT) to create a leading professional training ground for a broad and diverse range of music graduates and students. YCAT’s fourth career development seminar tackles the vital issue of maintaining your physical and mental wellbeing as a performer. BAPAM trainer, Jane Oakland, a music psychologist and vocal consultant, will be joining the panel to discuss issues around physical and mental wellbeing for those working in performance, and provide techniques to prevent and overcome these issues should they arise. This is a great opportunity to ask questions and discuss the challenges and benefits to all performers in engaging with this essential element of a balanced musical life.

Panel:

Matthew Jones – violist and performance health expert

Jane Oakland – BAPAM registered music psychologist and vocal consultant

Aaron Williamon – Professor of Performance Science, Royal College of Music

Time and Location: Tuesday 24th January – Royal Overseas League, London
Panel discussion: 1 hour
Q&A: 30 mins
Post-seminar: drinks and networking
Cost: £5

All welcome! Tickets are limited. 

Book your tickets here.

 

Musicians’ Health and Wellbeing – an Interdisciplinary Approach

Tuesday, May 3rd, 2016

A one day research seminar funded by the British Psychological Society (Division of Health Psychology)

12th May 2016 | 9.30 am – 5 pm
Royal College of Music, London

The physical and psychological demands of the training and practice that musicians must achieve to perform to a high standard on their instruments can produce deleterious effects on health and wellbeing, arising mostly from musculoskeletal and anxiety-related causes. In an attempt to bridge the gap between musicians’ health, health psychology and sports psychology, this event brings together experts who will approach topics such as musculoskeletal issues, performance anxiety, stress management, health promotion, implementation research and behaviour change.

The event is free but advance booking is essential.

Find out more.