Posts Tagged ‘Research’

Research: The Wellbeing of Musicians Across the Lifespan

Thursday, October 5th, 2017

Musicians sometimes spend a lot of time looking at what is wrong, which can give more energy to challenges and create a downward spiral. Positive psychology is influenced by the idea that in spending more time focusing on what’s right, we allow ourselves to consider what it looks like to do well, which can in turn lead to a more positive physical/mental/emotional outworking.

Marie El-Khazen is a researcher inviting musicians aged 60+ to take part in interviews which will help develop knowledge and understanding of musicians’ perception of wellbeing as a performer, throughout a lifelong professional career.

If you’d like to help with this study you need to be aged 60+, having earned the majority of your full time income from employment as a performing musician. Interviews lasting 60 – 90 minutes will be conducted face to face, or via Skype, and will be recorded (on a dictaphone). Participants will remain anonymous. To take part or to find out more, please contact Marie directly by emailing U1620023@uel.ac.uk. You can also find here a detailed participant invitation letter.

This research has been approved by the School of Psychology Research Ethics Committee, and follows the standard of research ethics set by the British Psychological Society.

Research Published into Ballet Dancers’ Experiences of Injury and Osteopathy

Friday, February 24th, 2017

Osteopath, Toby Pollard-Smith, has published his research into Professional ballet dancers’ experience of injury and osteopathic treatment in the UK  in the January 2017 issue of the Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies. BAPAM helped recruit participants for the project, which Toby undertook while training to be an osteopath.

Toby’s previous career as a professional ballet dancer contributed to his interest and expertise in treating dance injuries, and we were recently pleased to welcome him to our Directory of Practitioners. Toby, who is also a keen trumpet player, treats dancers, musicians and other performing artists in Ascot and Marlow. Find Toby Pollard-Smith on the BAPAM Directory.

Research: Vocal Health Awareness in Singing Students and Teachers

Thursday, February 16th, 2017

Dr Anneliese Sayes is a medical doctor and researcher at the Royal College of Music who is investigating the current knowledge levels of vocal anatomy, physiology and pathology in singing students (within the conservatoire and university systems) and singing teachers.

She is inviting participants to fill in a questionnaire (that should take around 10-15 minutes to complete). There is a separate questionnaire for students and teachers. Full information about the study, which has research ethics approval from Conservatoires UK, is also provided. The survey can be accessed online via the following links:

Vocal Awareness questionnaire for student singers

Vocal Awareness questionnaire for singing teachers

Survey: Musical ergonomics in professional UK orchestras

Thursday, February 9th, 2017

Are you a musician working in a professional UK-based orchestra? Could you help us support research into performer healthcare by completing a short anonymous survey on musical ergonomics?

If so, please read the information below before you complete the survey. The survey should take no more than 5 minutes.

Subject: A survey of musicians’ knowledge, access to and use of musical ergonomics in professional UK orchestras.

Hello my name is Teresa Airley, and I would like to invite musicians’ aged 18 years or over, working in professional UK-based orchestras, to participate in a voluntary and anonymous survey on musical ergonomics.  I am undertaking an MSc in performing arts medicine at University College London, and I am interested in learning what motivates musicians to use ergonomic aids.

What are ergonomics? Ergonomics are aids that support musicians within their working environment.  These can be instrument specific adaptations to help reduce playing discomfort, or improve playing posture.  For example chin or thumb rests, or straps to support instrument weight and maintain good posture.  Or, advice on healthy practice such as posture, warm-ups, stretches, and regular breaks.  Environmental ergonomics include appropriate seating, lighting, and hearing protection within performing venues.

Why is this study being done?  Musicians are at risk of developing playing-related injuries.  Education on healthy practice and use of ergonomic aids can help to reduce, or prevent injuries.  My survey explores what motivates musicians to use ergonomic aids, and how knowledge of musical ergonomics is acquired, and what benefits or barriers there are to using ergonomics at work.

Consent: Completing the survey implies consent to participate in this research study, and as participation is anonymous it will not be possible to withdraw your data once you have completed your questionnaire.

How and what data will be collected, and where will it be stored? This survey is anonymous and all information you provide is confidential.   No individuals will be identified in any reports arising from this research.  The survey is available via Opinio and all data gathered is held securely within University College London data centres.  This project has been approved by the UCL Research Ethics Committee.

Contact information: If you would like more information regarding the study please email me direct at teresa.airley.15@ucl.ac.uk Please visit the British Association for Performing Arts Medicine (BAPAM) website at www.bapam.org.uk for further information on specialist health support available to performing artists.  Free specialist medical advice is available from BAPAM.  For enquiries telephone: 020 7404 8444 or email: info@bapam.org.uk

Access the survey here

Thank you for your time.

Solo Pop Singers: How do you feel about your wellbeing in the music industry?

Wednesday, February 1st, 2017

 

Professional singers invited to take part in new research project at the Royal College of Music

Are you a professional solo singer in popular music genres including pop, rock, dance, jazz, blues and folk?

Would you like to help develop our understanding of health and wellbeing experiences in the music industry, and inform future support networks?

Lucinda Heyman, a Performance Science researcher at the Royal College of Music, is looking for professional solo singers, signed to a record label or making a living from singing, to be interviewed for a new project. You don’t need to have experienced a health problem to take part. The research covers positive as well as challenging experiences. You may feel that your work in music has positive effects on your health, for instance.

If you are interested in taking part you can contact Lucinda directly by emailing lucinda.heyman@rcm.ac.uk

She will explain the project and provide you with a detailed participant information sheet.

Any information you provide will remain confidential. The project has Research Ethics Committee approval from Conservatoires UK.

Dancers Study

Wednesday, November 23rd, 2016

A new international study explores the relationship between physical activity, including dancing, other risk factors (such as diet), and health.

The National Institute of Dance Medicine and Science and the Centre for Sport, Exercise and Osteoarthritis are investigating the long-term effect of these factors and their relation to the risk of disease, including osteoarthritis.

The team are asking participants to complete an online questionnaire, which is anonymous. Taking part is entirely voluntary and if you wish to do so, you are free to withdraw at any time. If you agree to continue you will be asked to complete two more questionnaires which will enable the researchers to get an understanding of how much physical activity/dancing you do and the effects on your overall health, including your lower body joints

The deadline for participation is the 31st of March 2017.

An optional prize draw is available for those who wish to enter.

The link to access the survey is: https://nottingham.onlinesurveys.ac.uk/dance

Performing Arts Medicine Graduates at IADMS Conference in Hong Kong

Tuesday, November 8th, 2016

We are delighted that two of our Performing Arts Medicine graduates from the University College London Master’s degree in Performing Arts Medicine presented their research results at the International Association for Dance Medicine and Science (IADMS) 26th annual conference at the Hong Kong Academy of Performing Arts.

Susanna Piculell, a Swedish Physiotherapist working in private practice and with the Swedish Volleyball team, undertook research with the Royal Ballet into pre-seasonal screening and injury rates in classical ballet. Since graduating from UCL she has relocated to Sweden and integrated her gained knowledge and skills at Lunds Dans och Musikalgymnasium (a secondary school for dance and musical theatre students), Malmoe Academy of Music and Artists and Musicians health in Malmoe. Experiences from her MSc (including the many observations at the BAPAM clinic) have contributed not only to Susanna’s clinical work but also to new career opportunities. She is now also lecturing on ergonomics and healthy lifestyles for musicians.

Karolin Krell, Physiotherapist and Osteopath, works in private practice in London and regularly tours with the German National Rowing and Skeleton Team. She explored sleep and rest habits amongst performing artists during her MSc studies and presented her results during the science poster session in Hong Kong. Since completing her MSc she also practices on site at the London Contemporary Dance School and supported various circus and dance companies backstage to keep busy tour schedules rolling. Furthermore, Karolin is very eager and involved in the newly formed UK Osteopathic Performing Arts Care Association (OPACA), an interest group for osteopathic students and osteopaths involved or interested in the health care of performing artists.

Susanna and Karolin both share a passion to support and develop performing arts medicine and enjoyed the conference very much. IADMS strives to enhance the health, well-being, training and performance of dancers by ‘cultivating educational, medical and scientific excellence’. The meeting in Hong Kong proved to be a wonderful opportunity to exchange thoughts and ideas with dance medicine and science experts from all over the world. After four exciting days filled with seminars, poster presentations, movement sessions and social events (and tropical storms!) Susanna and Karolin returned inspired with new ideas for management and treatment approaches within the dance sector. Amongst many things, it was very beneficial to have the opportunity to network and connect with peers. Meeting other delegates from Finland and Sweden allowed Susanna to further develop collaboration between Scandinavian performing arts medicine practitioners. One idea is to arrange a smaller Scandinavian meeting in 2017 as an additional networking opportunity prior to the IADMS 28th meeting, which will be in Helsinki 2018.

Susanna and Karolin are very grateful in particular to the British Association of Performing Arts Medicine (BAPAM) and their supervisors that guided them though their studies at the University College London.

Susanna was winner of the BAPAM prize in 2015 for the UCL PAM MSc Research Project.

Both Susanna and Karolin received BAPAM Shipley-Rudge Research & Education Awards to support attendance at research conferences to present their MSc research during 2016. BAPAM is able to offer these awards thanks an annual donation from Dr Mike Shipley and Philip Rudge.

Music Technology Research

Friday, May 27th, 2016

Researchers at the Royal College of Music’s Centre for Performance Science are working on an international project to find out more about musicians’ use of technology.

The project, called TELMI, investigates new technologies to enhance the learning of musical instruments and develop new tools to increase efficiency, engagement, and healthy practice habits in musicians ranging from professionals to beginners.

All musicians aged 16 and over are invited to complete the following survey:

www.surveymonkey.com/r/TELMI-tech

UCL Research: Eating Disorders in Musicians

Friday, March 11th, 2016

Marianna Kapsetaki is a medical doctor and a classical pianist studying for the Performing Arts Medicine MSc at University College London. She is conducting a research project into eating disorders in musicians.

Any musician (performer, student, academic, etc) 18 years or older is welcome to complete this survey. You will be asked 24 questions which should take approximately 10-15 minutes to complete. You can stop completing the survey at any point as your participation is voluntary. By submitting a completed questionnaire however, you are giving your informed consent to participate in the study.

If you would like to take part, please click here to complete the survey.

This study has been approved by the UCL Research Ethics Committee (Project ID Number: 8069/001). The information you provide will be treated as strictly anonymous, confidential, won’t be passed onto a third party and will be handled in accordance with the provisions of the Data Protection Act 1998.

If you have any further questions about the research, feel free to contact Marianna at:  uclresearch2015pam@gmail.com.

If you would like to receive the final report of this research project please send a request to the email above. You don’t need to write your email address at the end of the survey.

If you would like advice about eating disorders, support organisations include:

National Centre for Eating Disorders
Eating Disorders Support Charity
Eating Disorder Support Service (SEED)
Beating Eating Disorders Trust (BEAT)
Anorexia and Bulimia Care Organization
National Association of Anorexia Nervosa and associated Disorders (ANAD)

June 2015 Newsletter

Wednesday, June 10th, 2015

Our June 2015  Newsletter  is now available to read or download in pdf format:

British Association for Performing Arts Medicine Newsletter June 2015

Contents:

I Can’t Go On! Managing Performance Anxiety
Directory of Practitioners Update
Training Day Summary
Piano Professional Magazine
Research Projects
Associate Medical Director Appointed
We’re Recruiting: Job Opportunity at BAPAM
Dr Kit Wynn Parry
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