Posts Tagged ‘Stage Fright’

Surge in demand for backstage therapists due to pressures of social media

Thursday, September 13th, 2018

The pressures of performing in today’s social media culture means more and more therapists are working backstage to support performers in need according to an article in the Sunday Telegraph.

BAPAM registered psychotherapist Helen Brice who is featured in the article, says she is getting more requests for her services due to the fear of a blunder going viral within moments.

She says the emergency sessions which she gets called out for involve calming exercises to reduce a performer’s anxiety. According to her other factors affecting performers at the moment includes a demand to tour frequently, falling incomes and the need to stand out in a hugely competitive industry.

Helen has worked for more than twenty years in the music business in the areas of performance, production, publishing, artist management and classical music. She says over the last couple years people have started to become aware that the mistakes they make may be spotted and commented about on online within seconds. This possibility is becoming the source of more anxiety and is adding to the pressure to always say the right thing and avoid any thing that may be deemed inappropriate.

Her work backstage involves supporting clients with breathing exercises, using low energy techniques or more dynamic work depending on what the client needs the most at that time. The kinds of people Helen has helped includes musicians on the orchestral circuit as well as pop and classical artists and more recently, grime artists.

YCAT Sounding Board – Health and Wellbeing for Performers

Wednesday, January 11th, 2017

YCAT Sounding Board is the new initiative from the Young Classical Artists Trust (YCAT) to create a leading professional training ground for a broad and diverse range of music graduates and students. YCAT’s fourth career development seminar tackles the vital issue of maintaining your physical and mental wellbeing as a performer. BAPAM trainer, Jane Oakland, a music psychologist and vocal consultant, will be joining the panel to discuss issues around physical and mental wellbeing for those working in performance, and provide techniques to prevent and overcome these issues should they arise. This is a great opportunity to ask questions and discuss the challenges and benefits to all performers in engaging with this essential element of a balanced musical life.

Panel:

Matthew Jones – violist and performance health expert

Jane Oakland – BAPAM registered music psychologist and vocal consultant

Aaron Williamon – Professor of Performance Science, Royal College of Music

Time and Location: Tuesday 24th January – Royal Overseas League, London
Panel discussion: 1 hour
Q&A: 30 mins
Post-seminar: drinks and networking
Cost: £5

All welcome! Tickets are limited. 

Book your tickets here.

 

I Can’t Go On! Managing Performance Anxiety

Wednesday, May 13th, 2015

Dr Carol Chapman and Karen O’Connor, experts in performance psychology and coaching, have authored our new Factsheet, I Can’t Go Ona resource all about overcoming performance anxiety (stage fright), one of the most common challenges facing any performer. Constantly striving for the very highest standards is essential but when, for whatever reason, a performer experiences less than perfection, they can be excessively hard on themselves and a vicious circle of worry and self-doubt can follow. The good news is, there are tried and tested strategies to deal with this.

All our information resources can be found here: BAPAM Health Resources.

We are grateful to Help Musicians UK, the Musicians’ Union and Equity for financial support in producing these materials.

Havas New Approach – International Summer Academy for Strings in Oxford

Wednesday, April 30th, 2014

Kató Havas is a violinist and violin and viola teacher who developed the “New Approach to violin playing”, a method of releasing physical and mental tension, which could help prevent physical injuries and anxiety related to playing the violin or viola. A frequent presenter at European String Teachers’ Associaton events, Kató’s teachings are now continued by her assistant, concert violinist, Caroline Duffner.

The summer New Approach workshop to string playing is held in the beautiful setting of St Edmund’s Hall of the University of Oxford.

This year’s Summer Academy features a presentation by Candy Connolly, introducing South Indian violin playing with the New Approach.

This workshop is suitable for students and amateurs as well as performers and teachers.

Full details including booking information can be found here: carolineduffner.com/oxford-violin-workshop-2014

Please note that this event is not organised by BAPAM and we receive no revenue from it.

 

Event Report: Performers in their Environment Training Day

Thursday, November 28th, 2013

Our November 2013 event brought together actors and musicians with professionals working in performing arts healthcare, education and support and welfare, for a stimulating investigation into the work, lifestyle and health realities of the industry.

Professor of Performance Science, Aaron Williamon, discussed musicians’ hearing and the tricky issue of noise regulations for workers for whom noise is their product.

Philip Turner, Senior Stage Manager of the English National Opera, shared valuable expertise and insights into the considerations of caring for performers, crew, and audience, and in supervising the work environment, both at the ENO in London, and on touring productions. Osteopath, Jennie Morton, presented on workplace hazards, drawing from her work as a performer (dance/theatre/singing).

Former professional oboist turned pioneering Performance Coach, Karen O’Connor, was joined by a singer and a double bassist to discuss novel applications of sport psychology for managing performance anxiety and developing mental toughness.

We also heard from professional performers about the ups and downs of their careers. Jungle Drummer, Chris Polglase, talked us through his career, from leaving music school in frustration at course requirements that he learn endless indie rock parts, to turning a hobby into a sustained professional career playing 180bpm drum & bass beats, alongside turntablists and musicians from a diverse spectrum of styles. Chris talked about the pressures of extensive touring, playing 5am gigs at clubs and festivals, studio sessions, and gradually learning self confidence and how to care for yourself.

Bringing a fascinating day to a close, David Sulkin, Chief Executive of the Musicians Benevolent Fund, interviewed two actors at very different stages of their careers – covering the stresses (physical, emotional and financial) and rewards of the profession.

We’d like to thank all the speakers, performers and attendees.  All agreed that first hand discussion with performing arts professionals proved especially valuable in providing perspective for those who seek to help care for their health and welfare. Thanks also to the Musicians’ Union for so generously providing the venue.

More information about our Training Days can be found here: BAPAM Training Days.

Research into Musicians’ Approaches to Musical Practice

Wednesday, June 19th, 2013

Emese Hruska, a PhD researcher at the University of Roehampton, is recruiting London based musicians to help her look at musicians’ attitudes and experiences towards their musical practice.

This current project is part of her PhD research, and it involves interviewing  musicians regarding their experiences and views about their musicianship , their musical and individual identity. Interviews will take about 1 hour, and can be arranged at a suitable location chosen by the participating musician to express his/her thoughts and feelings freely. Participants must be based in London.

Emese’s long term goal is that the findings will contribute to developments in preventing and/or managing problems related to music performance anxiety and perfectionism in musicians. On completion of the project, Emese intends to equip musicians with adaptable empowerment strategies for strength, persistence, positivity, autonomy etc.

If you are interested in taking part, please contact Emese directly by email: hruskae@roehampton.ac.uk

This project has been approved by the Research Ethics Committee at the University of Roehampton.

The results of the project will be shared with BAPAM, and we’ll report back at a future date.

 

Autogenic Training Course with Giovanna Reitano

Monday, December 17th, 2012

This course is provided independently by Giovanna Reitano, an AT practitioner with a background in the performing arts (music, drama and storytelling), and a member of the British Autogenic Society and the BAPAM Directory of Performing Arts Medicine Practitioners.

To find out more and for bookings, please contact Giovanna directly at autogenic-training@musarteandmore.com.

Enhancing Performance with Autogenic Training

Autogenic Training (AT) is a simple relaxation technique and alternative therapy which helps to reduce stress and stress-related conditions, enhance performance, and general well-being.

The seven weeks AT sessions/course helps to:

Bring the body and mind into a state of awake relaxation at will, for example also before or after a performance.

Reduce stress symptoms such as anxiety, stage fright, panic attacks, muscular and emotional tension, headaches and migraines, tiredness, sleeplessness.

Improve focus, concentration and creativity.

Enhance performance and self-esteem.

Develop a calmer attitude to stressful situations.

Venue: The British Association for Performing Arts Medicine (BAPAM), Totara Park House, 4th Floor, 34–36 Gray’s Inn Road, London WC1X 8HR.

Cost: A course of 7 weekly sessions costs £185.

BAPAM Newsletter April 2012

Thursday, April 12th, 2012

Our April 2012 Newsletter is now available to download in pdf format here:

BAPAM Newsletter April 2012

 

BAPAM Training Day May 19 – Key Psychological Issues

Thursday, April 5th, 2012

BAPAM training events provide an in-depth look at some of the key areas of Performing Arts Medicine and unique insights into aspects of performers’ health and wellbeing. Our May 2012 event focuses on the psychological issues encountered by performing artists.

Performing artists work in a highly competitive industry and are driven to achieve perfect results. Stress and anxiety are often in the background when performers present with physical symptoms. In addition, the psychological impact of an injury affecting performance can be tough to deal with. All health care practitioners working with actors, dancers, musicians, singers and other artists will find something here to apply in their practice.

BAPAM training events may be used as part of your CPD portfolio.

The programme for the day covers:

  • Diagnosis
  • Depression/bipolar
  • Anxiety
  • Career choices and development
  • Performance coaching
  • Autogenic Training
  • Role play as a therapeutic tool
  • Screening tools for psychological problems

Click here for the detailed programme

The cost of the day is £65 (Students £35).

Venue: University College London, Gower Street, London, WC1E 6BT – Closest tube: Warren Street. We will update with the exact room numbers/campus directions as soon as we have confirmation from UCL.

To book your place or for more information please email Office and Clinics Manager, Clare Hicks, via clare@bapam.org.uk

Hypnosis Unit UK CPD Introductory Course

Tuesday, March 6th, 2012

Performing Arts Medicine practitioners, are you interested in the possible applications of hypnosis in your own profession?

Hypnosis Unit UK provide an Introductory Course in Applied Hypnosis. The next course takes place on Saturday 28th April 2012, at UCL Division of Psychology and Language Sciences.

Further information (pdf)