Posts Tagged ‘Stress’

June 2015 Newsletter

Wednesday, June 10th, 2015

Our June 2015  Newsletter  is now available to read or download in pdf format:

British Association for Performing Arts Medicine Newsletter June 2015

Contents:

I Can’t Go On! Managing Performance Anxiety
Directory of Practitioners Update
Training Day Summary
Piano Professional Magazine
Research Projects
Associate Medical Director Appointed
We’re Recruiting: Job Opportunity at BAPAM
Dr Kit Wynn Parry
Help Support Us

I Can’t Go On! Managing Performance Anxiety

Wednesday, May 13th, 2015

Dr Carol Chapman and Karen O’Connor, experts in performance psychology and coaching, have authored our new Factsheet, I Can’t Go Ona resource all about overcoming performance anxiety (stage fright), one of the most common challenges facing any performer. Constantly striving for the very highest standards is essential but when, for whatever reason, a performer experiences less than perfection, they can be excessively hard on themselves and a vicious circle of worry and self-doubt can follow. The good news is, there are tried and tested strategies to deal with this.

All our information resources can be found here: BAPAM Health Resources.

We are grateful to Help Musicians UK, the Musicians’ Union and Equity for financial support in producing these materials.

New and Updated Health Information Factsheets

Wednesday, January 21st, 2015

We know that a career in the performing arts can be physically and psychologically tough. Whether you’re on stage or behind the scenes, it takes a lot to keep the show on the road. BAPAM helps many people overcome health challenges that arise while they are working or studying in our industry.

Our free online Factsheets are designed to help you look after yourself and perform at your peak. They include advice about preparing for performance, from physical warm-ups to psychological self-care, coping with anxiety and challenging working conditions, caring for your voice, hearing, taking care of nutrition and alcohol consumption.

Click here for all of our Factsheets.

These materials are a developing resource, as we bring the expertise gained through our clinical practice and Trainer Network to focus on making key information available to all performing arts professionals and students. Look out for new BAPAM health resources throughout 2015 and please get in touch with Information Officer, Dan Hayhurst (dan@bapam.org.uk), with any comments and suggestions.

BAPAM Warm Ups Leaflet

Our Warm-up Exercises for Musicians pocket-sized leaflet is just one of our updated health resources

Event Report: British Tinnitus Association Conference September 2014

Tuesday, December 23rd, 2014

Dr Anita Nathan, NHS GP and BAPAM Clinician reports from the BTA conference 2014 

The British Tinnitus Association (BTA) is the leading source of information about tinnitus in the UK. All patients contacting BAPAM with concerns about the condition are advised to contact the BTA and investigate their many excellent publications. BAPAM’s recently updated Factsheet on hearing, Don’t Lose the Music, also highlights the BTA as a vital resource.

I attended their fascinating conference, held in September 2014 at the British Library Conference Centre in London. This short report summarises a few key points of particular interest to BAPAM clinicians and performing arts medicine specialists.

In an overview of the highlights of recent research into tinnitus, we heard about a trial of MDMA assisted psychotherapy for tinnitus, investigations into neural plasticity and multisensory processing, ‘residual inhibition’ (a brief suppression of tinnitus sounds after an offset (i.e. a presentation) of an external sound), and the way that sound therapy depends on the degree of hearing loss associated with tinnitus.

Investigations have been made into the effects of amplification with hearing aids in tinnitus patients with a co-existing mild to moderate hearing loss. One trial found that a hearing aid had an equal effect to a sound generator. Hearing aids can act as both noise generators and amplifiers for tinnitus treatment. Some early trial results suggest positive results from low level input from hearing aids for tinnitus sufferers without any hearing loss.

Some research suggests that stress may be a more significant factor in tinnitus than other causes (such as hearing loss and noise exposure). Cortisol, which is a marker for stress, affects hearing. Trials are ongoing into mindfulness based stress reduction approaches to managing tinnitus.

People with severe tinnitus have chronically higher basal cortisol levels than those with less severe symptoms and people without tinnitus.

A number of systematic reviews have shown the efficacy of CBT (Cognitive Behavioural Therapy).

Both avoidant coping and active coping mechanisms can seem to worsen tinnitus so it is necessary to find a balance. Increasing age is associated with increasing tinnitus annoyance.

GPs and assessing clinicians need to be aware that the first contact with someone suffering from tinnitus is very important. Catastrophic thinking worsens tinnitus so think carefully about giving the advice ‘learn to live with it’. Audiology-led tinnitus services seem to be the way forward, with an ENT opinion sought afterwards if necessary. There are shorter waiting times, less anxiety for the patient, and all initial investigations can be done by the audiology team.

All tinnitus patients should be given a hearing test to find out if they have hearing loss.

The BTA’s own Conference Reports from 2010 – 2013 can be found on their website here: http://tinnitus.org.uk/conference-reports.

BAPAM Journal Issue 2

Wednesday, July 23rd, 2014

Issue 2 of the BAPAM Journal, our free online resource and channel of communication for all those engaged with performing arts health, education and welfare, is now available to download here: BAPAM Journal Issue 2 – July 2014. Many thanks to all our contributors and those who have made a voluntary effort to assist with its production. Please consider supporting our work by becoming a Friend of BAPAM or making a one-off donation.

Contents include:

Interview with Professor Rodney Grahame on performing arts medicine and hypermobility

Work, Identity and Involuntary Musical Career Transition Jane Oakland

Playing-related Musculoskeletal Disorders in Flautists: A Pilot Study Investigating Risk Factors and Interventions that may Affect Outcomes
Dr Patricia Halliwell

The Impact of Hypermobility in the Finger Joints of Flautists Isobel Artigues-Cano

Biotensegrity and Cello-playing Felicity Vincent

The BAPAM Student Advocate Scheme: Reflections on a Health Promotion Initiative at the University of Leeds Naomi Norton

BAPAM Clinics: Learning from our Patients Deborah Charnock, Dan Hayhurst and Clare Hicks

Reflections on Contributing to the NICE Consultation Process on Developing the Guidelines for Social Anxiety Disorder Dr Carol Chapman

European Union Exchange Programme – An initiative to Encourage International Collaborations in Health Promotion Asmund Prytz

Book Review: The Alexander Technique for Musicians by Judith Kleinman and Peter Buckoke Alison Loram

Performing Arts Medicine MSc Student Hub

Student Advocate Scheme Update Naomi Norton

Previous Issues: 

BAPAM Journal Issue 1 June 2013

 

Jane Oakland, Music Psychologist

Wednesday, January 15th, 2014

Welcome to the BAPAM Directory, Dr Jane Oakland, a psychologist specialising in musicians and performance. Jane has also been a professional opera singer for 35 years. Through her own experience of debilitating performance anxiety Jane became interested in the impact of stress on the careers of professional musicians.

 

Jane’s excellent website, www.stresspoints.co.uk, provides a wealth of useful information on the psychology of performance,  as well as articles she has contributed to Classical Music Magazine, the Incorporated Society of Musicians, and Help Musicians UK (formerly the Musicians Benevolent Fund).

Event Report: Performers in their Environment Training Day

Thursday, November 28th, 2013

Our November 2013 event brought together actors and musicians with professionals working in performing arts healthcare, education and support and welfare, for a stimulating investigation into the work, lifestyle and health realities of the industry.

Professor of Performance Science, Aaron Williamon, discussed musicians’ hearing and the tricky issue of noise regulations for workers for whom noise is their product.

Philip Turner, Senior Stage Manager of the English National Opera, shared valuable expertise and insights into the considerations of caring for performers, crew, and audience, and in supervising the work environment, both at the ENO in London, and on touring productions. Osteopath, Jennie Morton, presented on workplace hazards, drawing from her work as a performer (dance/theatre/singing).

Former professional oboist turned pioneering Performance Coach, Karen O’Connor, was joined by a singer and a double bassist to discuss novel applications of sport psychology for managing performance anxiety and developing mental toughness.

We also heard from professional performers about the ups and downs of their careers. Jungle Drummer, Chris Polglase, talked us through his career, from leaving music school in frustration at course requirements that he learn endless indie rock parts, to turning a hobby into a sustained professional career playing 180bpm drum & bass beats, alongside turntablists and musicians from a diverse spectrum of styles. Chris talked about the pressures of extensive touring, playing 5am gigs at clubs and festivals, studio sessions, and gradually learning self confidence and how to care for yourself.

Bringing a fascinating day to a close, David Sulkin, Chief Executive of the Musicians Benevolent Fund, interviewed two actors at very different stages of their careers – covering the stresses (physical, emotional and financial) and rewards of the profession.

We’d like to thank all the speakers, performers and attendees.  All agreed that first hand discussion with performing arts professionals proved especially valuable in providing perspective for those who seek to help care for their health and welfare. Thanks also to the Musicians’ Union for so generously providing the venue.

More information about our Training Days can be found here: BAPAM Training Days.

Musicians’ Union Wellbeing Week

Monday, July 22nd, 2013

The Musicians’ Union, with input from BAPAM and the Musicians Benevolent Fund, hold a Wellbeing Week for their members in August.

Wellbeing sessions take place in London and Birmingham, and for those unable to attend corporeally, there is also the option to join in via Skype transmission.

Sessions will cover healthy practice, posture, stress, life-coaching, yoga, and more.

This is a fantastic opportunity to benefit from the experience and wisdom of a range of professionals who work with musicians enabling them to have healthier and happier lifestyles.

 

Click here for all the information.

 

BAPAM Newsletter April 2013

Wednesday, April 17th, 2013

Our current newsletter is now available in pdf format here: 

BAPAM Newsletter April 2013

  1. May 18th Training Day, Cardiff University
  2. Research and Education Bursary Fund
  3. Directory of Performing Arts Medicine Specialists and Practitioners
  4. Student Advocate Scheme
  5. Event Reports
  6. Justin Howse
  7. Fran Nevrkla OBE
  8. Staff News
  9. 2013 Review and Improvement Plan
  10. Service Monitoring – How Are We Doing?
  11. Fundraising, Mountain Climbing

 

Event Report – When The Artist’s Body Says No: Stress and the Mind-Body Unity in Health and Disease

Tuesday, March 26th, 2013

Jennie Morton reports from the recent PAMA event held in Toronto, 16th/17th February 2013.

Jennie’s attendance at the event was supported by BAPAM through our Research and Education Bursury Fund.

WHEN THE ARTIST’S BODY SAYS NO: Stress and the Mind-Body Unity in Health and Disease

by

Jennie Morton BSc (Hons) Osteopathy
UCL Honorary Lecturer, MSc Performing Arts Medicine

I recently attended the PAMA regional meeting at the beautiful Royal Conservatory of Music in Toronto, Canada, hosted by PAMA President, Dr John Chong. This was a two-day event packed with a variety of speakers presenting on a wide range of health-related topics from the world of dance and music. The first presenter was Gary Galbraith from Case Western Reserve University who took us through his “Dancer/ Musician Wellness Project”, a wonderfully comprehensive software package providing health screening for both student and professional performers. This software enables teachers and health professionals to make targeted pre-training or pre-season recommendations for individual performers and to monitor training/ performing exposure and track injury rates. They are offering the package free to training establishments and dance companies worldwide.

Another highlight was Laurel Trainor, PhD a Professor of Psychology, whose research has shown that infants as young as 4 months old can tell the difference between dissonance and consonance and will already show a preference for consonance at this age – fascinating! She has also shown that the brains of music students mature differently to those not studying music suggesting that music has a profound effect on brain wiring. This has far-reaching implications for the study of neurological development.

The keynote speech was delivered by the wonderful Dr Gabor Maté, author of the book “When The Body Says No” for which the conference was named. He spoke about the mento-emotional aspects of disease making particular reference to the high-stress environments encountered by performers and the role this can play in their health. He read a particularly moving excerpt from his book concerning the life of the great cellist Jacqueline Du Pré and her battle and subsequent death aged 28 from the effects of multiple sclerosis. While still a teenager, she had apparently confided to her sister that she knew that being a professional cellist would kill her because of the pressures of high expectations of others – a poignant premonition and one to be borne in mind by those involved in the care and training of young prodigies.

We were also very fortunate to hear from some industry icons who shared their experiences of injury in an extremely candid and moving panel discussion. They included the acclaimed contemporary dancer Peggy Baker, Grammy-nominated saxophonist Jane Bunnett and Stephen Sitarski, renowned violinist and Concert Master of the Hamilton Philharmonic. Their frank and highly emotional accounts of their journeys with injury and depression tugged at the heart-strings of the entire audience and really served to highlight the often-hidden agonies behind the mask of performance.

I was also fortunate enough to have been invited to present a workshop on the musician/ instrument interface and was joined by a 16 year-old violin student, who is something of a child prodigy, to act as my model. We were treated to her extraordinarily talented playing whilst I made recommendations for postural adjustments – a fun, interactive hour! On the final day, I was also a member of a panel discussion on wellness strategies for student dancers and musicians, the panel being comprised of three health professionals and three teachers. We discussed the need for a multi-disciplinary approach in supporting the health of students and ensuring open lines of communication between health practitioners and teachers.

This two-day event as packed with excellent ideas and strategies to ensure the continuing good work in performing arts medicine is reaching the people who need it and served as an excellent networking forum for performers, teachers and health practitioners alike. I’m delighted to have been invited back to speak at this event again next year and look forward to keeping up this very important dialogue.