Posts Tagged ‘Tinnitus’

BAPAM Training Day – Brass and Hearing

Wednesday, August 17th, 2016

Our next Performing Arts Medicine Training Day focuses on Hearing and Brass instruments.

Saturday 19 November
9.15am – 4.30pm

National Council For Voluntary Organisations
8 All Saints Street
London, N1 9RL

We’re looking forward to learning from uniquely experienced healthcare practitioners and arts professionals. This is a great chance to share expertise with peers, make connections and grow our performing arts medicine network. BAPAM Performing Arts Medicine Training Days are ideal for people working in healthcare, and all those engaged in wellbeing in the creative arts, who want to develop their skills in this fascinating specialism.

Full price tickets are £120 with discounts available for BAPAM Registered Practitioners, BAPAM Clinicians and Performing Arts Medicine MSc students.

If you prefer not to book online, please call us on 020 7404 5888.

The provisional schedule for this event is below. Timings and titles will be confirmed shortly.

9.15 – 9.45  Registration and Coffee

9.45 – 12.45 Morning session (includes coffee break):

The effect of air pressure in brass players: Dr Alan Watson, Anatomist & Neuroscientist, Cardiff University

Demonstration of brass playing and ergonomic adaptations: Dr Jonathan White, GP & BAPAM Clinician, Birmingham; Owen Wallage, Tuba player & member RAF music services

Tinnitus: Nic Wray, Communications Manager, British Tinnitus Association

Lunch 12.45 – 1.30

1.30 – 4.30 Afternoon session (includes tea break):

Age-related hearing loss: Dr Frances Williams, Consultant Rheumatologist, Musicians and Performing Artists Clinic Leader, St Thomas’ Hospital London & Researcher in Age-related hearing loss, King’s College London.

Data protection: what every practitioner should know: Paul Ticher, Data Protection consultant

Research presentations: Naomi Norton (RNCM PhD recipient): The role of music teachers in health promotion

MSc prizewinners – tbc

Lunch is included in the ticket price.

Event Report: British Tinnitus Association Conference September 2014

Tuesday, December 23rd, 2014

Dr Anita Nathan, NHS GP and BAPAM Clinician reports from the BTA conference 2014 

The British Tinnitus Association (BTA) is the leading source of information about tinnitus in the UK. All patients contacting BAPAM with concerns about the condition are advised to contact the BTA and investigate their many excellent publications. BAPAM’s recently updated Factsheet on hearing, Don’t Lose the Music, also highlights the BTA as a vital resource.

I attended their fascinating conference, held in September 2014 at the British Library Conference Centre in London. This short report summarises a few key points of particular interest to BAPAM clinicians and performing arts medicine specialists.

In an overview of the highlights of recent research into tinnitus, we heard about a trial of MDMA assisted psychotherapy for tinnitus, investigations into neural plasticity and multisensory processing, ‘residual inhibition’ (a brief suppression of tinnitus sounds after an offset (i.e. a presentation) of an external sound), and the way that sound therapy depends on the degree of hearing loss associated with tinnitus.

Investigations have been made into the effects of amplification with hearing aids in tinnitus patients with a co-existing mild to moderate hearing loss. One trial found that a hearing aid had an equal effect to a sound generator. Hearing aids can act as both noise generators and amplifiers for tinnitus treatment. Some early trial results suggest positive results from low level input from hearing aids for tinnitus sufferers without any hearing loss.

Some research suggests that stress may be a more significant factor in tinnitus than other causes (such as hearing loss and noise exposure). Cortisol, which is a marker for stress, affects hearing. Trials are ongoing into mindfulness based stress reduction approaches to managing tinnitus.

People with severe tinnitus have chronically higher basal cortisol levels than those with less severe symptoms and people without tinnitus.

A number of systematic reviews have shown the efficacy of CBT (Cognitive Behavioural Therapy).

Both avoidant coping and active coping mechanisms can seem to worsen tinnitus so it is necessary to find a balance. Increasing age is associated with increasing tinnitus annoyance.

GPs and assessing clinicians need to be aware that the first contact with someone suffering from tinnitus is very important. Catastrophic thinking worsens tinnitus so think carefully about giving the advice ‘learn to live with it’. Audiology-led tinnitus services seem to be the way forward, with an ENT opinion sought afterwards if necessary. There are shorter waiting times, less anxiety for the patient, and all initial investigations can be done by the audiology team.

All tinnitus patients should be given a hearing test to find out if they have hearing loss.

The BTA’s own Conference Reports from 2010 – 2013 can be found on their website here: http://tinnitus.org.uk/conference-reports.

BTA brings Tinnitus Information Day to London

Monday, September 2nd, 2013

The British Tinnitus Association host the next in their series of free one-day tinnitus information events at the Royal Society of Medicine, 1 Wimpole Street, London, W1G 0AE on Saturday 9 November.

Full information here: http://www.tinnitus.org.uk/bta-brings-tinnitus-information-day-to-london

British Tinnitus Association Survey

Monday, June 7th, 2010

Do you experience tinnitus? Complete this British Tinnitus Association survey by 16 July and you could win £100

The British Tinnitus Association is the primary source of support and information for people with tinnitus in the UK. They have a really useful web site which you can find here: British Tinnitus Association

British Tinnitus Association