Posts Tagged ‘Wellbeing’

Mental Health and Wellbeing Services for Performing Artists: Guidance for the Performing Arts Sector

Tuesday, July 30th, 2019

Consultation Paper

BAPAM is pleased to have brought together a working group of clinicians and performing arts organisations interested in addressing challenges to the mental health and wellbeing of those who work in the sector. The group has produced guidance to support the development and delivery of services specifically for performing arts professionals and students. The guidance is designed to be used by:

• organisations commissioning or wishing to commission mental health services for performing artists

• organisations and practitioners providing mental health and wellbeing services for performing artists

• education providers offering mental health and wellbeing support to students

• individuals and agencies wishing to support best practice for performing artists

• performers and other performing arts professionals wishing to understand the standard of practice they can expect from services.

This guidance has been developed by BAPAM’s Psychosocial Working Group. We aim to make a real difference to the quality of services available. The purpose of the group is to provide a forum in which approaches to prevention, care and support can be discussed, and clinical leadership can be provided for developing and maintaining an evidence-based service designed to support performing arts professionals and students with vocation-related mental health issues. The group has drawn on the clinical evidence base, including National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE) guidelines, which contain reviews of published evidence for healthcare interventions from clinical and cost-effectiveness perspectives, to produce this guidance for the performing arts sector. There are seven key areas of focus:

1. Preventing Mental Health Problems
2. Early Clinical Assessment
3. Brief Intervention
4. Peer Support
5. Ensure Links with the NHS
6. Multi-disciplinary Team Approach
7. Managing a Crisis

We are publishing this paper for consultation and welcome all comments which will be considered prior to the final launch.

Read or download the paper here:

Mental Health and Wellbeing Services for Performing Artists: Guidance for the Performing Arts Sector – A Consultation Paper

Comments can be posted via the online survey here: https://www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/NKRFVGD

The consultation is open until 15 September 2019.

Healthy Touring Checklist and Rider

Monday, July 22nd, 2019

Artists, crew, and management teams can use a Healthy Touring Checklist as part of planning for a tour and prepare a Health Rider to help people involved with the tour support artist and crew wellbeing.

Our Healthy Touring Checklist has been developed as a result of a review of the evidence, consultation with experts, and our evaluation of a series of Healthy Touring Workshops with artists awarded funding for touring by Help Musicians UK’s Do it Differently Fund.

We are working with Help Musicians UK to finalise this guidance for publication. We have made a working document available which you can download here: Healthy Touring Checklist and Rider

If you’d like to give us any feedback on this, suggestions for additional items for the checklist, or resources that can help, please email claire.cordeaux@bapam.org.uk. We’d love to hear from you.

Thanks to our original Healthy Touring Panel, our BAPAM trainers – Lucy Heyman, Dr Helen Brice and Dr Pippa Wheble – and Help Musicians UK.

Touring is a fundamental part of performance professions and, as much as it is exhilarating, it can also be intense and tiring. During this period health problems which are unmanaged can be exacerbated, and new health problems can arise. Evidence from research tells us that around 75% of performers have health problems. Like many athletes who use their bodies intensively, physical problems and pain are common and, as freelancers, performing arts professionals often have no choice other than to attempt to maintain their careers, continuing to work while suffering from and managing physical symptoms. These problems are exacerbated by, and contribute to, psychosocial issues. The touring environment (with pressures relating to travel, working late, lack of sleep and a poor diet) and the high demands artists and crew make on themselves can all lead, potentially, to deteriorating mental health. Schedules often mean that healthcare is not available when most needed.

All of these factors can impact on the success of performances, the longer-term sustainability of a career and the individuals themselves.

Being able to discuss our touring practices with someone was very valuable, it’s not often that you’re able to sit down and think about how you could improve these practices. It can feel very isolating at times so it was really good and constructive

We were able to reflect and see that the things which we found stressful and difficult about touring were actually an amalgamation of small things, most of which we could do something practical about improving.

Effective ways to warm up my vocals & easily incorporate the warm-ups to my usual pre-performance routine

Helpful strategies for coping with performance stress, work-life balance and general wellbeing

BAPAM Psychosocial Working Group

Tuesday, May 7th, 2019

BAPAM has convened a Psychosocial Working Group to bring together clinicians including doctors, clinical psychologists, psychotherapists and counsellors, charities working with performing arts professionals to support mental health, and academics conducting key research.

The group provides a forum in which approaches to care and support can be discussed, and clinical leadership can be provided for developing and instantiating a service designed to support performing arts workers with issues related to vocation-related physical and mental health issues. We are using the NHS-approved evidence base produced by the National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE), who review the published evidence for healthcare interventions from a clinical and a cost-effectiveness perspective, to map the services available to performing artists against the clinical evidence for best practice and identify gaps in those services.

The prevalence of mental health problems is considerably higher in the performing arts community than in the general population, and suicide rates are well above the national average. There is an acute awareness of the problems within the performing arts industry and many artists have been sharing their mental health experience in the context of their work.

The group has mapped many of the initiatives developed to support performers including Help Musicians UK’s Music Minds Matter helpline, Theatre Helpline, Music Support, which has a particular focus on addictions, Equity supported Wellbeing Drop-in sessions at the Actors Centre,  Music & You, Music for Mental Wealth and BAPAM’s own free service, which provides clinical assessments for performers across the UK. In addition, there is a growing number of practitioners who have trained to work in this area, building on insights gained from previous careers in the arts industries, for example, the Music Industry Therapist Collective.

We are grateful to have had so many valuable insights from practitioners and agencies involved in this important work and together we’ve begun identifying what is available, what is missing and how we should work together to support a comprehensive approach to mental health services for performers.

Mental illness is not a straightforward condition. Some people will experience just one episode of mental ill-health in their lives. Of those who receive a brief intervention, half will recover and never have another one. Others, however, experience recurrent episodes and will continue to do so through their lives even though they may be well for significant periods of time. It is essential that performing arts professionals experiencing challenges to their mental health receive accurate diagnoses as quickly as possible to ensure they access the right care. Where brief interventions are indicated, these should be delivered by practitioners who have a track record of working with performing arts clients. Healthcare practitioners, however they are employed, need to be able to access professional support from mental health specialists to ensure they are making the right diagnoses and to refer on if necessary.

Discussions to date have identified many areas for action, but the immediate areas to take forward have been identified as follows:

  1. Development of guidance for the performing arts industry covering points of best practice for performers, care providers and all organisations commissioning care for performers
  2. Rapid access to clinical assessment to determine the best care pathway
  3. Provision of brief interventions tailored to the needs of performing artists,  focusing on performance anxiety
  4. Access to mental health specialists (e.g. psychiatrists and clinical psychologists) for advice on the management of patients’ complex needs, for practitioners working outside the NHS
  5. An annual CPD event for psychosocial practitioners working in, and developing their career in performing arts health care
  6. A collective effort to support fundraising which aims to meet identified gaps for all practitioners

New Clinics in Liverpool and Belfast

Wednesday, April 17th, 2019

As part of our commitment to reach and support performers throughout the UK, we are pleased and excited to announce new regional clinics, this time in Liverpool and Belfast starting in May 2019. 

BAPAM are delighted to be working with the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra, who will host the clinic at the Philharmonic Hall, and Dr Marie McKavanagh, a Performing Arts Medicine specialist GP (and musician).

Liverpool Philharmonic have pioneered an exemplary approach to developing and supporting performance excellence through providing specialist health and wellbeing services to orchestra musicians. The positive effects of this investment are proving that performer wellbeing and artistic excellence are interlinked. Taking care of both also makes good business sense. Performers are healthier, happier, take less time off sick and are better prepared for elite performance. Through their key support for the new BAPAM clinic, Liverpool Philharmonic are now helping to bring this approach to the whole performing arts community.

The first clinic will be held on Wednesday 1st May. 

Belfast

BAPAM are also delighted to be working with the Oh Yeah Centre, Belfast’s music hub, who will host the clinic, providing vital support for a healthy and vibrant performing arts community.

The clinic is led by Dr Christine Hunter, a BAPAM and  NHS GP and Medical Adviser to the Ulster Orchestra.

BAPAM’s Belfast Clinic will be held monthly from May 22

Who is the clinic for?

If you make a proportion of your living from, or study in the performing arts, and have a physical or psychological health problem related to your work, BAPAM can help you. BAPAM clinicians can provide an accurate diagnosis and information to help you overcome problems. The BAPAM team can identify the best sources of ongoing care, both in the NHS and from other specialists, and advise you about sources of financial support for people experiencing health problems affecting their ability to work or study.

Other regional clinics:

Glasgow: Friday 10th May, 7th June

Leeds: Thursday 2nd May

How to book a FREE confidential appointment?

Call 020 7404 8444 to register | Or email info@bapam.org.uk

Free Health and Wellbeing Webinar Series with ISM

Tuesday, February 5th, 2019

Tuesday 5th February to Tuesday 26th February

We have teamed up with the Incorporated Society of Musicians to present a series of free webinars looking at musicians’ health. Our performance health experts will lead the sessions, exploring solutions to problems frequently encountered in music careers. For more information on each session and how to book a free place click here.

Looking after yourself on tour: Tuesday 5th February
Health in the gig economy: Wednesday 13th February
Resilience and bullying in the workplace: Tuesday 19th February
Preventing playing related injury: Tuesday 26th February

 

BAPAM Performance Environment Day

Tuesday, November 6th, 2018

What would an ideal performance environment look like? Is such a thing even possible when we work in such widely different spaces? How do our environments affect our health, our creativity, our social relationships? What can healthcare professionals, technicians, artists, support organisations and communities do to both support performing arts wellbeing and facilitate excellence in artistic practice?

Our Performance Environment Day explores these topics, from a healthcare perspective and including the experiences of other professionals including artists, technicians, educators and people working in arts support roles, some with additional needs due to illness, injury, difference or disability

You can now read the full programme.

The event takes place at Resource for London on November 17, 9.30 – 17.00.

Tickets are available here.

 


Presentations and Discussion

The Performance Environment: Challenges in the Performing Arts Industry
Sophie Lane, Specialist Performing Arts and Sport Physiotherapist

Saving Your Ears for the Music!
Gladys Akinseye and Jordon Thompson, Clinical Audiologists and Hearing Therapists

Preparing for Challenging Performance Careers
Arran Peck, Athletic Development and Conditioning Coach, National Centre for Circus Arts

Cognitive Function of Adult Amateur Pianists
Dr Marie McKavanagh, GP, MSc Performing Arts Medicine Shipley Rudge Award Winner

Anxiety and Psychological Support for Theatre Productions and Artists
Dr Anna Colton, Chartered Clinical Psychologist

Panel Discussion/Q&A

Do our performance environments facilitate or obstruct artistic practice? How can the ways in which we design, manage, use and share space be a positive factor in healthy practice? Collective support in creative communities, accessibility and participation.

Kris Halpin, Musician/Producer
Robin Townley, CEO Association of British Theatre Technicians
Lisa Tregale, Head of BSO Participate, Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra
Siân Willett, Co-creator of Wellbeing for the Arts

Dan Hayhurst, BAPAM Information Coordinator (Chair)

Vocal Health Workshop in Glasgow

Friday, September 7th, 2018

Top vocal and performance coach Lucy Heyman will be conducting an afternoon workshop for vocalists in Glasgow.

The BAPAM training session organised by the Musicians Union will take place at the Scottish Trades Union Centre in Glasgow on 13th September. It will cover essential skills for enhancing vocal performance with the aim of giving tools and skills needed to succeed and thrive in music careers.

As a manager Lucy Heyman has worked with a range of artists including some of the UK’s biggest names, so has a real understanding of the trials and tribulations a performer goes through.

The topics she will cover include vocal techniques and warm-ups, preparation for performance and psychological skills for optimal performance.

BAPAM’s healthy performance training sessions are designed to avoid health problems which are often encountered in the course of an arts career and are led by the experts in the field. To enquire about booking a BAPAM training session email info@bapam.org.uk

We also run free medical assessing clinics for performing artists in Glasgow every month. (Next one is 5th October) To register as a patient and book an appointment call our helpline on 0207 404 8444/5888

The Music Commission: Opportunities and Barriers to Progressing in Music

Wednesday, May 2nd, 2018

The Music Commission, supported by ABRSM, has launched its first call for public evidence, with a survey containing a series of specific questions around progress in the development of a musical life. Taking part enables all voices to be heard, so if you are involved in music education – as a music leader, teacher, learner, or consumer – The Music Commission would like to hear from you!

Have you found abundant opportunities to develop your musical practice or have there been barriers to participation in musical life? What are your positive and negative experiences of learning and work environments, your peers in the arts community, teachers, employers, media, access to venues and rehearsal space,  housing, earning a living or supporting yourself through university? Perhaps you have you encountered health problems that have been a barrier to progress – there are significant physical and psychological demands placed on music students and professionals, which can be eased or exacerbated by social factors.

Please take the survey here.

The Music Commission is also asking organisations within the music sector to run focus groups, an initiative you can find out about here: Let’s Talk Music. The questions are modeled on the online survey.  How the discussions take place and in what context however, are entirely up to the organisation hosting them. The aim of the group is to discuss questions and then to put together a collaborative statement which draws on the thoughts, feelings and opinions of the group.  This can be submitted in writing, or using recordings, video content or images.

 

Healthy Performance Workshops at The Actors Centre

Thursday, September 28th, 2017

We’re pleased to announce a new series of healthy performance workshops in partnership with The Actors Centre, with funding support from Equity.

Members of The Actors Centre can book their place for the first two sessions now.

Look out for more workshops as the series continues through 2018.

Friday 10th November: Finding a Work-Life Balance in Changing Times 

Dr Carol Chapman
Counselling Psychologist and Performance Coach

This 3 hour interactive workshop looks at ways of establishing a viable work-life balance and managing time effectively in the context of irregular jobs and irregular working patterns. These can affect health and well-being and impact on family and social life. The workshop illustrates ways of managing the stress reactions these unpredictable patterns can bring, and shows how to facilitate resilience. Participants will be able to raise appropriate issues that affect them personally and options for coping will be described and discussed. Suggestions for taking ideas further will be made. Book here

Friday 8th December: Healthy Voice

Dr Jenevora Williams
Singing Teacher and Vocal Health Expert

All voice users suffer from ill health at some time. Find out how to minimise the vocal fatigue suffered as a result of overuse or misuse. You can also learn

about the effects of medications, environmental factors, hormones, ageing, and of course – stress.

Dr Jenevora Williams will begin with a brief summary of how the voice works, followed by a practical guide to understanding and managing your own voice use. Book here

Injury Prevention at The Purcell School for Young Musicians

Thursday, June 8th, 2017

The Purcell School’s Specialist Physiotherapist, Sarah Upjohn, has had her pioneering work incorporated in the school’s new Playing-Related Musculoskeletal Injury Prevention Policy. While working at the school (and helping performers here at BAPAM), Sarah’s Doctoral work at the University of Cambridge has focused on preventing playing-related injuries in young musicians. Most of these problems, which musicians starting university and entering the profession frequently already suffer from, are preventable. The Purcell School’s strategy to identify risk factors and improve injury prevention awareness among pupils, staff, parents and all involved with the school, is exemplary in preparing young musicians for healthy and succesful careers.

Find out more and read the policy here.